Mine is bigger than yours: Shop A/C notes

On Fri, 10 Aug 2007 00:07:54 +0100, Mark Rand


Wound rotor? Watt-hour meters I've seen have rotating discs with no windings on them.
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On Thu, 09 Aug 2007 18:39:19 -0500, Don Foreman

Wound rotor in the sense that the current in the disk, that the voltage coil field interacts with, is produced by transformer coupling from the current coils. It's a wound rotor with a one-turn winding and a transformer rather than sliprings.
Trying to get across the concept that force=field x current x length and that the current in the disk is generated by one set of coils and the field is generated by the other set.
Or wound rotor as opposed to squirrel cage motor, where the rotor current is due to the rotor moving relative to the magnetising field.
Regards Mark Rand RTFM
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On Fri, 10 Aug 2007 17:09:53 +0100, Mark Rand

OK, I see your point. Rotor eddy currents are not produced by the field that produces the torque (voltage coil field) but by a separate excitation means (current coils), while rotor currents in a squirrelcage rotor (hence torque) are due to slip speed. I guess the key difference is that generated torque is proportional only to the vector product of the field strengths, and not to rotor speed. Speed is then determined by where this generated torque is balanced by speed-proportional drag torque from a permanent magnet.
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On Fri, 10 Aug 2007 15:55:16 -0500, Don Foreman

That's what I was trying to get at.
If I'd have been any good at explaining things in writing, I'd have been an author. If I'd have been any good at getting people to understand what I meant, I'd have been a manager.
I'm Neither <G>
regards Mark Rand RTFM
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On Fri, 10 Aug 2007 23:27:13 +0100, Mark Rand

But (unlike most authors and managers), you do know how a kwh meter works. <G>
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On Thu, 9 Aug 2007 08:23:41 -0400, "Proctologically Violated"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electricity_meter
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wrote:

Easy,
They put seven engineers (like Cliff) on a committee, they argued for twenty years, six of them died, number six died on April 15, 1931.
Tom
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Tom:
    Well there ya go. You can always be counted on to drill down to the bedrock of a matter. At 20C, of course. <g>
--
BottleBob
http://home.earthlink.net/~bottlbob
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

LOL LMAO ROTFLMAO
and that's a LOT of rollin' and laughin' <G>
--
John R. Carroll

www.machiningsolution.com
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On Tue, 7 Aug 2007 15:15:12 -0700, "J Carroll"

See you have dealt with a few of "those" types in your time....lol,
Tom
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On Aug 7, 2:39 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Wonderful! Except Cliff isn't French...
The commonly given reason is that, in addition to being a comfortable working temperature in a toolroom, 20.0000 C and 68.0000 F are the same temperature no matter how many zeroes you tack on. The French and the English both get a round number.
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Put the aluminum into a freezer for 24 hours before you machine it.
John
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Woops I missed something, run it dry no coolant.
John
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Guminess is due static cohesion, so you might need electricity to cause that. What happens here, that aluminum gums up is something similar to induction between two molecules, the valence exchanges one electron with to its neighbor, however, aluminum always has one floating around that's why it attracts another from its neighbor so it doesn't know the difference between neighbor and itself, so what you get is a strong non-conductive static bind which can cause gum build-up.
John
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But it sounded good!! I was even going to quote it to sound knowledgeable. :)
Actually, tho, it does make some chemical sense. Crystal structures do change without effectively altering the base atom (ergo heat treating, diamonds, etc), and they do so with subtle shifts in orbital structure, more like orbital angle changes, rather than true quantum leaps'n'shit. This orbital bending sort of "precedes" the orbital changes you see in true covalent bonding.... uh, Bottle....
--
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Mr. P.V.'d (formerly Droll Troll), Yonkers, NY
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On Aug 6, 12:54 pm, "Proctologically Violated"

I don't know what kind of lighting you have, but flourescent lights are a lot more efficient. Even if you have flourescent lights, it might be worthwhile to switch to T8 lamps.
At this time of the year, you might also be able to find some sales on high efficiency air conditioners. A relatively small one that would run nearly continuously ought to let you just run the air conditioner without running the dehumidifier. Neither of these things will help your short term cash flow, but will help in the longer run.
Dan
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wrote:

I don't know what kind of lighting you have, but flourescent lights are a lot more efficient. Even if you have flourescent lights, it might be worthwhile to switch to T8 lamps.
======================================I have both T12 and T8, the T8's accumulating as HD has the 4-footers for $7. But they charge over $6 for the g-d bulbs--2 pak. Can get'em for about $1-$1.50 each at Sam's, iirc, in 10 paks. Soft/warm whites are much more, tho.
These fixtures as a whole are rated at 2x40 (T12), or 2x32(T8), but I'm betting the whole thing is closer to 100 W. Hopefully the lumen output is much greater than the same wattage incandescant--would be inneresting to know the actual comparison. ======================At this time of the year, you might also be able to find some sales on high efficiency air conditioners. A relatively small one that would run nearly continuously ought to let you just run the air conditioner without running the dehumidifier. Neither of these things will help your short term cash flow, but will help in the longer run. ========================That's actually an excellent idea. Clearly without heating up the place, nor cooling it down too much. However, I am sort of condemned to an Amana portable, which I think only puts out about 7K, and that's probably optimistic. I think the smallest window unit, which I couldn't use anyway, would be about 6K. I believe the Sam's club dehumidifiers, about 600 W, are equiv to about a 4-5K A/C. But your point, in a bigger shop, seems to be on the money. AND, you get boucou "free" and perty pure water.
As it is turning out, the shop is cool-er to begin with, and even with the dehumidifier going, I don't think the A/C kicks in.
I was going to go with a mini-split (esp now that I've got a punched hole through the 2-foot foundation wall for the amana hose--wow....), but if the crappy portable is doing the job to excess, imagine what a mini-split would do! In fact, I installed the Amana as a sort of trial run, and was very surprised.
How crappy is the Amana? So much so, the PC Richards guy was discouraging me from buying it! No power, he said. But, so far it hasn't broken (second year, heavy use up until now), and the chinese quality on these things at least does not have me gnashing my teeth. And it did the job! Also, it can spit out the condensate with the hot air, if you choose. Really pretty neat, AND I think this increases efficiency, somewhat.
--
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Mr. P.V.'d (formerly Droll Troll), Yonkers, NY
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On Aug 6, 6:44 pm, "Proctologically Violated"

A 100 watt incandescent is about 1700 lumens. Unless you get a long life or rough service bulb. Then 100 watts is only 1200 lumens. A 32 watt T8 bulb is 2600 to 2800 lumens.
Dan
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In the shop I like the daylight tubes.
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message

<snip>
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychrometrics
--


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