minor gloat CO2 tank

Yesterday my wife was working so I had to take my visiting sister-in-law to the hair dresser. And then went on to the local scrap yard. There I pick
ed up a handful of swarf. Not any old swarf, but some stainless 316 swarf that was lathe turnings about a foot long. Nice looking chips, tightly cur led. I had shown my wife some earlier and she wanted more to use in decora ting a Christmas tree next December. It will be one of the Christmas trees at the Nemours Mansion. Such is married life.
But while surveying what was at the scrap yard, I saw an aluminum 20 lb CO2 tank. Took a little effort to get to it, but I managed.
The stainless sward, the tank and a little hobby vise weighted 29 lbs. And they charged me $30 for the lot. The price for aluminum is $1 / lb. So t hey slightly overcharged me. But considering how often they have not charg ed me anything for stuff, ZI think I am way ahead.
So I took the tank to the same welding supply supply whose name was on the tank label. and paid $29 to exchange it for a full tank. $25 for the gas and $4 hasmat fee. The tank I got was dark blue with some spray painted la rge letters on it. So I painted it a nice green with a rattle can.
If I needed a CO2 tank, it would have been a major gloat. But I already ha d one tank with my mig welder and another in the basement with a regulator and short hose on it. The hose has a tire inflator adapter on it. I have some plastic soda bottle with a tire stem in the cap. So I can make sparkl ing water. So this tank may go to my son and his grand children.
Yes this in not really on topic, except for the part about using swarf for Christmas decorations,
Dan
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Yeah, but the curls have me concerned. Those suckers are SHARP! And you're going to put this on a Christmas tree in a CHILD medical care facility?
Man! Be careful! (not of you, but of how many kids amputate fingers on that stuff!)
LS
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On Wed, 14 Sep 2016 10:24:11 -0500, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

I had the same thought. Reminds me of Dan Aykroyd on SNL with the "Bag O' Glass" skit.
Pete Keillor
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On Wednesday, September 14, 2016 at 11:24:19 AM UTC-4, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Well first it is not in a child care facility. It will be in the Mansion t hat Alfred Du Pont built near the Childrens Hospital. And displayed in a r oom with a guide there to see that people behave and do not touch the ant ique ornaments on the tree ( or steal them ).
Second they curls must have been done on a lathe with a lot of horse power. They are fairly thick. I pulled them out of a 55 gallon drum using my ba re hands and sufered no cuts. My wife and sister-in-law have also handled them with their bare hands and had no cuts. So while I wouldn't want to ju mp in a pile of them while naked, they are not all that sharp.
But it is a reasonable warning. If they wore thinner sharper chips I would not have brought any home.
Dan
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Good to know! I have a child who was benefitted by Nemours, and I know they're 'careful', but you can never be 'too careful' around kids!
Lloyd
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On Wednesday, September 14, 2016 at 3:32:43 PM UTC-4, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

I believe you can not be too careful around kids about thing that can cause serious injury. But you should let them do things that will cause them pain. Like hit their finger when holding a nail to start it.
Dan
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Ayup! My own kids (including the CP'd disabled son) have ALL had the opportunities to 'bang their fingers'.
Lloyd
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On Wed, 14 Sep 2016 10:24:11 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

Ditto the concern, plus his wife might be liable for the medical fees associated with the sliced up kids. Tinsel is a lot cheaper all the way around.
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wrote:

HUH? We're talking about the man's wife putting it on a public Christmas tree which many kids will be around. He bought the swarf at a scrap yard. School and machinery aren't even in the picture.
Think hard about what you just proclaimed.... <bseg>
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Gunner, you're WAY off-base with this. I completely agree that kids aren't taught to work with their hands, and that it's a disaster for our country and society. But THIS isn't about obeying, or learning, or manual skills.
Most of the kids in a Nemours facility are little ones. Kids like to touch things. In fact, that very curiousity is _part_of_ the skill set you claim they don't have. The tendency of little ones to touch, feel, tug, pull, and remove shiny things is the 'natural' beginning of technical competency.
He confirmed that the kids WON'T be in a position to touch this particular tree, so I don't see a lot of problems with using curls (or even det-cord) for decorations, as long as it can't endanger any LITTLE KIDS.
Lloyd
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wrote:

Damn, I wish we'd had det-cord when I went to school!

So, is a metal mesh stent in your future? <eek>
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wrote:

That's good.

So stop killing yourself and file for early Social Security, which you've been paying into for the last 40 odd years. I may not have much money, but I have enough, and getting away from the really hard work has done me lots of good. I got out before it killed me. Please consider doing so yourself, for the same reason, my friend.

Holy Shit, Batman! Will they be doing an R&R job, or do they expect for you to just roll over and die from it? If it doesn't kill you, that might be the "easy" road to disability income. _That_ would suck, wot?

Gunner, smoking is a simple choice. You choose either -to- smoke, or -not- to smoke. Make the decision. Smell like a dirty ashtray to everyone you meet, or don't. The choice is up to you. <g> I'm living proof it can be done. I stink purty!

Dayum, are you a marathon runner, too? Low BP and pulse rates are common to long distance runners.

Jewelcome, buddy.
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On Sat, 17 Sep 2016 20:09:15 -0700, Larry Jaques

Bwahahaha! Where the hell would you get such a stupid idea? Wieber hasn't been paying. It's probably been a couple decades since he last filed a tax return.
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20:09:15 -0700 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    Once you've kicked the nicotine - which is a real bitch to do - then comes the "habits of the hand". The automatic things one does which involve a cigarette. Couple stories, I was in college working on a CS degree. The one compiler was a frustrating kludge, and slow. I hit return and walked out of the lab, smacking my shirt pocket for my smokes - and realized I had quit smoking some twenty five years before. That's a habit.     The other story was of going to church with my then SO, and the preacher needed a cigarette for a prop, and someone way in back admitted they had one. Then having used it as a sermon illustration, he dropped his left hand by his side, and continued preaching. I noticed, and pointed out to herself, "guess who used to smoke a lot" judging from he way he fidgeted with that unlit cig.     OTOH, I knew two people who quit, mid-pack. So it is possible.
    Yeah, it is 'easy' to quit. "I've done it a thousand times" as the cliche has it. Its the "habits of the hand" which are the hardest to overcome. That morning cigarette with your cup of coffee, break time, etc.
    MY advice is to phrase it in terms of 'dispassion' - of adding tobacco to the lists of things one desires to no longer desire, and move on. Let me know how that works. While its only been 44 years since I quit, I still occasionally have a desire for one.
tschus pyotr
p.s. Or you cold switch to a pipe. More fiddling round, more "smoking as a social activity" than with cigarettes. -- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
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On Sun, 18 Sep 2016 07:00:18 -0700, pyotr filipivich

Not if you taper off first, as I know from experience. Drink lots of water to flush the toxins out of your system while you do. It works for all toxins in the blood. Drugs and other poisons.

I played with and sucked on straws (no comments from the peanut gallery, eh?) for a couple weeks afterward, getting over the manual and oral fixations. Habit trying to push through will.

Breaking a habit is a function of will. Most people have it and don't use it.

Another trick was to walk outside and take a few deep breaths when I wanted a cig. It works especially well in bad weather. <g>

I've never wanted another one for more than one second, when the memories of smells returned to remind me why I quit and stayed quit. So, that's maybe 6 seconds over 28 years.

Swap lung cancer for mouth/throat cancer. Wonderful change!
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On 9/18/2016 9:00 AM, pyotr filipivich wrote:

You might try bupropion aka Wellbutrin aka Zyban. I take 450 mg a day for depression. It's also prescribed for stop smoking. For me it prevented me from reaching the point of where I'd kill for a cigarette. I have quit my cigars for several months and it was no big deal. I started again because it really helps my depression. Had a Dr tell me that cigarettes were the worse thing you could smoke. I smoke a pipe sometimes. I have a piece of .250 OD x 8" piece of 304 SS for the pipe stem. No tongue bite at all. Surprised me.
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wrote:

Why didn't you admit to Jaques that you haven't been paying into SS?

Jaques is finally right about something!

A friend's adult son is a smoker and drug addict. Every time he goes to jail, he gets clean. Every time he comes out, he immediately goes back to drugs and smoking, and telling people that it's too hard to quit.

Ah, no, dumbass.
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wrote:

At this rate (strokes, bypasses, etc.) you may not last that long. Retire but stay active, which is easy for you.

That's a given. What, precisely, do they mean by the 5-7yr lifespan of grafts?

I've quit both alcohol and smoking. COFFEE is harder for me to quit because I love it. But I made the decision and quit both alcohol and nicotine, and I've never regretted either decision. If you keep telling yourself it's hard, it will be. The fact remains that it is a simple decision you have to make. Once you truly make that decision, it's simple to quit. Of course, it's much easier if you actively cut way back. I smoked 2+ packs a day and cut back to 1-10 cigs a day before quitting. I got the flu and didn't want a cig for 4 days. When I recovered, I decided that the hard part was over (nicotine flush) and quit. I flushed the cigs themselves (JIC) and threw away the package. It was and is a Good Thing(tm). Just Do It. Everybody who has tried and failed tells you how hard it is, and that's because none of them ever made the desision to actually quit. Most quit for other reasons/other people but still wanted to smoke. (Hard to imagine.)

The metabolic changes probably stuck with you. I wouldn't be a bit surprised if that's one reason for you retaining most of your mind after the stroke. It's either that, or you're an Agent Orange Zombie, and you know what Occam said. ;)

Paul was a Type A, eh? Condolences.

Very cool. More power to 'em!
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wrote:

LOL No. You're the opposite. A patient who self medicates with nicotine and caffeine no matter who tells you how stupid that is, and no matter how much it costs you for the cigarettes and soda, and no matter how much it costs taxpayers to deal with the fallout.

Time to be proactive and organize a new cull pep squad.

No.

No. Your results are, predictably, below average. http://eurheartj.oxfordjournals.org/content/30/4/453

You'll give up, as always. The only question is who you'll blame it on. Probably Clinton.
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CABG's (cardiac arterial bypass grafts) are not categorically "only good for 5-7 years". PLenty of people are walking around 20+ years post CABG.
The problem is that many who have such surgery continue the lifestyles that contributed to their needing it, so the likelihood of blockages recurring for them is somewhere between high and certain.
I had quintuple CABG over 8 years ago. After a recent annual routine checkup my cardiologist told me I can (and should) do anything I want, and let's make the interval between checkups two years rather than one. I feel better now than I did 7 years ago.
My cardiac ejection fraction six months post op was about 25%. Normal is in the neighborhood of 50%. I was told then that was about as good as it would ever get for me. Now, 8 years later, my last checkup showed that my e.f. is about 45%, nearly normal.
Lifestyle changes: nothing major other than I quit smoking the day of my surgery and have not had a puff since. I pay reasonable but not fanatic attention to healthy diet: I fry my fish in butter and I enjoy red meat a couple of times a week. I get off my butt to walk briskly for awhile most days but I'm certainly no hero beyond that.
wrote:

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