Need recommendations for pneumatic construction stapler

what he wants - within reason and the law . I also rebuilt his deck , and did a lot of other small jobs for him . Had several customers in that circle of friends , and they all lived in that same general neighborhood . A handyman that has multiple skills can pretty much write his own ticket in some places . North Midtown Memphis is one of them . Word gets out and a guy can make a decent living doing home repairs .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
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Just what kind of nails were you expecting ? These are full round head
paper . The ones for my P-C finish nailers are a straight strip held together with some kind of glue . What are you calling collated nails , coils held with wire ?
Reply to
Terry Coombs
Yeah! but steel posts rarely have to be replaced. Not so with wood posts "down here". If the pickets are about toast, the posts will not generally last much longer. It is a bad idea to replace only pickets and rails even if the posts seem sound. The posts poop out 3~5 years later. ;~(
IIRC I have to buy from a trades store.
Reply to
Leon
Pretty much, I use a 5/4 treated deck board. If it rots it is much easier and less expensive to replace than 16+ pickets.
I place the rot board on the ground, level, and attach to the front face of the post. Then the bottom 2x4 rail directly behind between the posts and 2.5" above the rot board. The rail's bottom is 1" below the top of the rot board. I put a nail or two through the face of the rot board into the bottom 2x4 rail to keep them from separating should one want to bow. Then a mid 2x4 rail between the posts and a top 2x4 rail on top of the posts. Pickets stand on the top edge of the rot board.
Reply to
Leon
the weight of the HF gun , but in many cases that added weight is an asset . I've used a lot of guns over the years , and find that the reduced felt recoil is a benefit - to me . Spend a day in a commercial cabinet shop shooting boxes together with 16ga 1/2" crown staples . You'll soon find yourself reaching for the heavier gun ...
Reply to
Terry Coombs
I have no doubt about that. It's certainly not unique to TN. It's probably pretty universal, at least in places where there is an active economy.
Reply to
krw
OK, I was thinking that the "rot board" was just for spacing and didn't remain part of the fence. I've never seen a fence constructed as you describe. Makes sense, though. End grain doesn't touch anything wet. I generally just left the pickets a couple of inches above the ground (so I could get a weed whacker under them).
Reply to
krw
Down here humidity is high. It is normal to walk into the yard first thing in the morning and your feet get wet. Even during a dry month. The bottoms of the pockets are always against the wet grass every morning. That is the problem. The added benefit of this style is that the fence is about 10% taller for more privacy. Now the pickets naturally will get wet with a sprinkler or rain but the bottoms are high enough off the ground that they will quickly dry and they will not be exposed to wet grass every morning.
See the link of a proposal for a customer. I tapered the top of the end of the fence to match the height of an existing shorter fence that it met up with.
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Reply to
Leon
Which is why I keep the pickets high enough off the ground to get a trimmer underneath them - keep the grass away from the wood.
Yeah, that's what I'd pictured from you description. I've never seen fence construction like that.
Reply to
krw
Yeah, I missed commenting on that. And there is nothing wrong with doing that. Most people down here want their fences touching the ground to keep small pets contained. If they can see under the fence the have a reason to dig under the fence. ;~) And another consideration, here, we have St. Augustine/carpet grass. It is typically pretty thick and best kept tall, cut at 3.5+" during the dry months. To keep the picket off of the wet morning grass so that you could weed eat under the picket, the picket would have to be pretty high above the actual ground.
AND just a side note about the rot board. The rot board holds up very well to a weed eater compared to a cedar picket.
Reply to
Leon
We had Zoysia when we were in Alabama. That stuff is like bamboo. The fence wasn't to keep critters in (the cats would just go over, anyway ;-).
I don't even put PT next to the ground, if there's any way around it.
But it looks like PT, against the cedar, right?
Reply to
krw
Yes sorry, PT everything except the pickets. I hate PT pickets, they are hard to find dry and bow like crazy. The cedar pickets tend to hold up much better, and look better.
Reply to
Leon

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