Oddball old torch

I have in my possession this strange old torch. This is a bench mount model, not hand held. It has a small cast iron tripod base, each leg about 3 inches
long ending in a small 3/4 inch diameter cylinderical foot. Two of the feet are tapped and contain spare nozzles with different size openings. There is a single set screw that locks and clamps a knurled upright that contains a clamping ball joint. The torch propper is an 1 1/2 inch diameter ball with three gas inlets on one side, a large needle valve on top, and a 3 1/2 inch long nozzle on the side opposite the gas inlets. The gas inlets are hose barb fittings with simple ball valves. The labels on the three vlaves read "GAS", "AIR", and "O". The long nozzle has a sheetmetal sleeve that tapers at the business end of the torch. This sleeve can slide in and out over the nozzle propper. Under the sleeve, there is a central tube that has another small nozzle (like the ones stored on the base). Surounding that there is a brass fitting with several holes in it that fits over the central tube and nestles down into the inside of the long nozzle.
Now where does all the gas go?
From the "GAS" inlet, the flow is down the main nozzle, through the perforated brass plate and out. The large needle valve on top does not affect this.
From the "AIR" inlet, the flow is down the inner tube and out the small removeable nozzle. It also flows down the main nozzle, through the perforated brass plate and out, just like the "GAS" does. The large needle valve controls only this flow.
From the "O" inlet, the flow and control is the same as for the "AIR" inlet.
Now, I have reason to believe that this is a glass blowing torch. I assume that this was designed for connection to typical lab bench type air and gas supplies. If this is true, then this is a low pressure methane/air torch?
Were the AIR and O used together, or was this simply a very flexible torch that could run on "gas" and either air or oxygen?
How would this be adjusted? I have three main supply valves, one large needle valve, three tips to choose from, and a sliding sleeve. Lots of stuff to tinker with.
I have reason to believe that this is a laboratory glass blowing torch (which is good as I intend to work glass and the bernz-o-matic leave much to be desired).
Any help?
-- Joe
-- Joseph M. Krzeszewski         Mechanical Engineering and stuff snipped-for-privacy@wpi.edu              Jack of All Trades, Master of None... Yet
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Does anyone have any idea how to adjust one of these? All the models I see out there now are all oxy-propane and only have two knobs to play with.
-- Joe
-- Joseph M. Krzeszewski         Mechanical Engineering and stuff snipped-for-privacy@wpi.edu              Jack of All Trades, Master of None... Yet
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