Question about watchmakers lathe uses

Saw this on eBay, it already sold:
Rare Boley F1 8mm WW Instrument and Watchmakers Lathe
Made in Germany Boley's most precise 5 day Auction!! Item number:
5056628181
My question is this: What can you do on this that you cannot do on a
new condition quality lathe. I have a like-new Colchester 13" and am
wondering what this watchmakers lathe can do that I can't...
I consistently work in 0.001 specs with no problem, If I have a full
set of collets and a collet drawbar, what would keep me from working as
precisely with my lathe as I could with the watchmakers lathe mentioned
above?
Thanks all.....
John
Reply to
CAMCOMPCO
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Find a 21-jewel lady's watch (preferably a dead one that has no value to speak of). Take it apart. Try to duplicate the smallest those parts on your lathe. I think after you've tried it you'll understand what the Boley will do that your lathe won't.
Reply to
J. Clarke
I sold a fully tooled Boley lathe with chucks and collets to a man in Minneapolis a few years back. Nice little system. I have pix around here somewhere of it. Beautiful work by the the people at Boley NIce little pedestal lathe with all the trimmings. Tiny motor. Pristine box of collets and cutters and other parts. Quite a treasure. perhaps he is making making time out of metal and saphire with it to this day And aren'twe all making time out of rubys and meta as we share this glorious time of year here on the blue marble somewhere out there a man is crafting clocks just because he thinks its the right thing to do... with a tiny lathe
Reply to
daniel peterman
I don't think I could duplicate it (ladies watch) with the Boley, not that good of a machinist yet, but, is it just the size of the cutter that makes the level of detail finer with a smaller lathe. Couldn't I fabricate a tool post holder that would hold the same cutters that the Boley would hold? Or, it it that 1 turn of a dial on the Boley is 0.00001 where my smallest "click" is 0.001?
John
Reply to
CAMCOMPCO
Indeed. And working to .001 is like doing heart surgery with an ax, when it comes to watches of this nature.
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Look closely at it and you will see that there _is_ no dial. With a Boley you work freehand or with purpose-made jigs.
The price on that particular Boley is a collector price, probably because it was one of the last models made by the company. If you want to have some fun you can find Webster-Whitcomb type lathes (the Boley is based on the Webster-Whitcomb design) online for under $200. You might want to get one of those and a book on their use and play with it when you have time. I think you'll find it highly educational. In a way it's a return to a different era.
One thing that those pictures don't really convey is the scale of it--this is really a tiny piece of machinery.
Reply to
J. Clarke
LOL. I've just found that when doing real fine work, a binocular microscope makes the difference between making it right, and busting drills and tools. You can *really* see what's going on there.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
Those are nice - I see the dentists using those sorts of things a lot now.
Still, the optics in a good microscope are probably a bit better, and they zoom as well. Granted it's somewhat confining to have to work in one spot at my bench, which glasses like that would fix.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
I have these ones:
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Very light and you can clip on different leses with different magnification (up to 10?). Not a huge magnification, mut very good for minute work. Also, they don't come in your way that much for "normal looking" (reachin for a tool etc.).
Really can reccomend them. And not expensive.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Müller
I use these
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, with a pair of grocery store bought half frame glasses underneath them. Can't live without them any linger.
And when I work Platinum I have a pair of protective glasses on top of the grocery pair. Quite a set up. Putting on 3 set of visual aids to get anything done. It's getting rather pathetic. :(
Abrasha
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Reply to
Abrasha
What is the purpose of the thing (faceplate?) that looks like it has 3 little anvils on it? It is near the front of the case in the first picture.
Reply to
xray
Abrasha wrote in news:npadnctNUusDAQ3enZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@comcast.com:
Here's one for sale (in the UK)
Reply to
D Murphy
This tool is used to clamp part like the "main plate" or a "bridge" of a pocket watch or wrist watch, so the various cutouts for spring housings and gears can be bored out. Take a look at the production process of fine watches at Audemars Piguet at
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Under the heading "Finishing", there is a picture that's titled "Circular graining of a bridge", which shows the cutouts very clearly.
Another image is under the heading "Assembly and Timing", "Assembly the 443 parts" You can clearly see the bored cutouts.
Another operation the tool is used for is shown here:
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Abrasha
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Reply to
Abrasha

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