RANT/follow up re Query - fly cutter tool grinding geometry

snipped-for-privacy@krl.org wrote:


Use a singlepoint diamond to reshape the stone. The star wheel dressers work best for cleaning the surface of cut and otherwise non-cutting grit particles (the cause of hot work, due to more friction than cutting).
Cheers Trevor Jones
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Andrew VK3BFA wrote:

Stop shaving, stop using soap, and get used to the itch, then.
:-)
You already are a consumer.
Why do you not just draw out the fly cutter and it's bit to get a handle on it's geometry?
A grade school drawing set has all the tools you need to do an "accurate" drawing, but a napkin and a crayon would serve well enough.
Cheers Trevor Jones
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Yep. But not of fly cutters - and why do any of us try to make things that can be store bought? -
Why do you not just draw out the fly cutter and it's bit to get a

Run out of crayons......besides, drawing is a 2nd year subject....

Andrew VK3BFA.
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On Mon, 16 Jul 2007 21:05:18 -0700, Andrew VK3BFA

=================Commercially available face mills and carbide insert fly cutters [like the B-58] are reasonably enough optimized for commercial high volume use in rigid high power machines, where the cost of tooling is included in the job bid price, and stocking a variety of inserts in the tool crib is accepted practice. Many of these tools are designed with negative/negative rake.
In many [but not all] home/hobby shops, the mills are low power and lightly built. From a power point, positive rake tools are desirable, as are smaller size tools with 5/8 or 1/2-inch shanks [e.g. 1/2 inch is the max size #2 MT collet available, 5/8 inch is the max ER25 collet]
The "standard" fly cutter is designed for a single tool bit set with 0/0 radial/axial rake. Of course you can grind in rake/hook, but as you sharpen the tool you are also cutting it in two.
In general, home/hobby shop equipment does not have the power/speed and more importantly the rigidity to effectively use carbide tooling.
Creation of a fly cutter with built in axial/radial rake [possibly 2, one for aluminum (c. +15 degrees) and one for steel (c +7 degrees)] using inexpensive M2 late tool bits that most any home/hobby shop machinist can easily shape/sharpen on a belt/disk sander or inexpensive grinder makes perfect sense.
Fabrication of such a fly cutter is well within the capabilities of all but the newest machinists, and requires only a minimum of tooling, and inexpensive materials [1/2 or 5/8 inch stripper bolt for the shank and a 2 X 2 X 1_1/2 block of steel], while providing very useful practice in precision layout, shop math, set up and milling. If 4 tool bits are used it is easy to set the cutter up so that you have rougher and finisher tools, and can employ different grinds/geometries. Try to buy one of those!!! Negative radial [chips to outside] positive axial fly cutters are also easily created.
FWIW - the commercial insert face mills use negative radial [chips to the outside] positive axial rake because the volume of chips produced and the number of inserts tends to trap the chips "inside" the face mill. With only 2 or 4 tool bits and much lower chip generation because of limited power, a multi tool fly cutter on home shop equipment does not have this problem.
How many people would like plans for such a fly cutter?
Unka' George [George McDuffee] ===========Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their gains.
Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, 17 March 1814.
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On Thu, 12 Jul 2007 06:11:43 -0700, Andrew VK3BFA

You refer perhaps to the M1A1 olive-drab manually-actuated individual recoilless dirt-launcher?
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On Tue, 17 Jul 2007 10:44:18 -0500, Don Foreman

Recoilless? I think that depends on the target material.
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wrote:

And the size of the foot.
Gunner
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I was thinking of over handed application in the 90 degree 'pick' orientation. The foot doesn't get involved unless your aim is very bad.
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