Recent thread on solid state disk drives

The prices are starting to drop:
30 GB SATA 2 SS drive: $199
<http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNoI33684&Sku=O261-6228
4 GB 2.5" PATA/IDE SS drive: $49
<http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo%52722&CatIdS01
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On Sun, 06 Jun 2010 03:57:43 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

What is the advantage of these drives over, say, a 32 GB jump drive at $70 (this week at Office Depot)? Speed? If so, how great is that advantage in practice? -- Best -- Terry
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Terry wrote:

><http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNoI33684&Sku=O261-6228
><http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo%52722&CatIdS01
They replace the hard drive in a computer. Someone was asking about small hard drives for machine tools. Spinning storage with an IDE/PATA interface is disappearing from the market. What good is a jump drive on something with no USB port?
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

We have that problem at work. Our newer Mitsubishi LASER CNC control runs on Win95. The only network option is a PCMCIA reader and LAN card in the reader. We installed the hardware and got the control to recognize a laptop running Win2KPro, and vice versa, but so far, we haven't gotten drive access to allow us to transfer files back and forth.
David
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"David R.Birch" wrote:

These are a huge improvement over the old 28 pin 'M-Drive' we used to run embedded NT in one product about 10 years ago. They are a lot larger, too. They were $380 for a 32 MB soft drive.
If your CNC will run with one of the formats that Windows can use, you can format the solid state drive & install the software, then just plug it into the CNC machine. You could even make a duplicate drive to use for troubleshooting or emergency repairs. It's cheap production insurance at those prices.
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

Right now we'd be happy if we could load files from anything other than the failing floppy drive. The control has a db25 serial port, but for some reason, Mitsubishi decided that just being able to transfer files with a COM program shouldn't work.
David
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"David R.Birch" wrote:

There are solid state replacements for 3.5" floppy drives, but they aren't cheap. They allow you to use a USB memory stick to load programs or data in CNC machines and other, old computers & computer based systems.
<http://hxc2001.free.fr/floppy_drive_emulator/index.html is one type.>
What type, brand & model floppy drive are you using? There may be a replacement, or if it is an older, full height 3.5" a good clean & lube of the bearings in the disk elevator may fix your problems. I used to repair 3.5" floppy drives when they cost >$75. Dry bearings and missing springs were common. Drives with bad heads gave me a good supply of donor parts.
If it is an oddball drive, photos would help. I currently have a couple hundred used floppy drives on hand. They are leftovers from a closed computer business, and others were removed from scrapped computer systems.
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

This is a possibility, we're already using flash drives to load programs to our newer Mazak, but I'd rather get everything networked.

It looks like a standard half height 3.5" floppy drive, but it isn't. I've tried substituting new drives, but the control doesn't read them, so Mitsubishi seems to have monkeyed with them so they can charge $700+ for them.
David
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MITS had custom drives that were larder (more bits) in the same format.
That might be what you are fighting. It was designed for IBM and likely used in other divisions and other MITS companies. Yes not all MITS are MITS. Color of the diamonds is a key. Red and Yellow... I had friends on both sides.
Martin [ former MITS DRAM ENG MANAGER N.A.]
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net "Our Republic and the Press will Rise or Fall Together": Joseph Pulitzer TSRA: Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
On 6/6/2010 9:08 PM, David R.Birch wrote:

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David R.Birch wrote:

You have to properly select the I/O devices in the parameters David. Which control is it?
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John R. Carroll wrote:

5x10' LZP with LC20B control
Here's a pic of the control:
<
http://www.meridianmachinery.com/photos/1730_1.jpg
David
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David R.Birch wrote:

That looks like a 530 control but you might also have the dreaded "Magic 64" which is an M64 with a PC front end. They had a hard drive and a floppy and ran '95 in the early models and then NT later on. You can upgrade the older ones. Does the control boot Windows when you power it up? Your problem, if you have a Magic, will be device drivers. Get the Ethernet adapter working. You can take any ISA Ethernet adapter and put it in the mother board on these things and then configure your connection through the Windows control panel.
You can send programs to the machine memory using your RS232 port but you will need to flip the control to the Mits side and do the transfer there. Do it the same way you would on a 520A-MR. Then save the program to the hard drive.
Anytime I have a Mitsubishi question I call Chicago. Those guys are GREAT, and they will be happy to help you out. They really know their stuff.
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John R. Carroll wrote:

This one runs Win95. Internally, it doesn't have a standard motherboard and I see nothing resembling ISA or PCI slots.

Yes. Since I installed the PCMCIA LAN adapter, I get a screen that asks for a password. The operators have been told NOT to enter anything, just hit INPUT or whatever the equivalent of ENTER is.

How would I identify a Magic 64?

No slots, ISA or PCI.

What is the 520A-MR, some sort of BTR device? A CNC control?

Do you mean MC Machinery? That's our usual Mits contact.
David
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David R.Birch wrote:

It should be in the pendant where the monitor is. They are a very small form factor board. You might have a hard time getting the LAN adapter in but it one can be made to fit if it doesn't. The motherboard is removable.

You have just done so. At least you appear to have some flavor of one. Magic 64 is the Hartford brand for these.

The 520 is one of the 500 series of Mits controls.

No, call Mitsubishi directly in Chicago. As I recall, the guy you want to speak with is Steve. Mitsubishi tech support at (847) 478-2500
That used to be the number anyway.
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John R. Carroll wrote:

I've been inside the pendant plenty, there is nothing resembling any motherboard I've seen since since I was playing with S-100 bus CNC controls. I've built PCs since XT clones were the hot setup and I've seen lots of mommaboards. I don't need to install a LAN card, the PCMCIA LAN adapter is talking with the Win2k laptop, we haven't figured out how to transfer files, though.

I'll give it a try tomorrow. Thanks.
David
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David R.Birch wrote:

Let me know what you find out, if it's not to much trouble.
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David R.Birch wrote:

Install the legacy NetBEUI protocol on the WIN2K box and your odds of sharing files with a WIN95 system go up dramatically. Try sharing a folder on the WIN2K box and the WIN95 system *should* see it. Otherwise enable filesharing on the WIN95 box and access that from the WIN2K box.
Last resort is install a FTP server on the WIN2K box (I use Ward's FTP daemon <http://www.warftp.org/ ) and use the Win95 command line FTP utility. You could install a GUI FTP utility, but the problem would be finding one that works on WIN95.
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These SSDs do wonders for old, memory constrained computers. I installed one in a laptop with 256 MB of memory and the effect was tremendous.
They are the future for everything besides slow file storage (like movies and backups).
i
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On Sun, 06 Jun 2010 12:46:17 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

How is the seek and retrieve time on the solid state drives, as compared to the good spinning disks?
Gunner
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Gunner Asch wrote:

There is no moving mechanical mass in a solid state drive so it's a lot faster that conventional drives. there is no oxide to shed from the spinning media, and they don't mind vibration or suffer from mechanical shock like older drives. You've seen the TV ads for laptops that survive being dropped while on? Guess how they do it. :)
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