Reusing lock washers

Greetings!
I'm working in a warehouse where they have a carton opener which blade held
by a 10-32 screw. The practice WAS to "CRANK IT DOWN" to keep the blade in
tight; this has resulted in screws seizing (die cast aluminum/zinc body) as
well as some pretty booger'd up screw-slots.
I think a lock-washer would give the proper hold without having to
over-torque the screw. Thing is - they need to take these apart each day to
replace the blade. Can a simple #10 lock washer be reused?
It would seem OK with occasional replacement when it seems to be getting a
little 'flat' and losing its spring.
=Alan R.
Reply to
Alan Reinhart
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I think you are on the right wavelength Alan. Try a split lockwasher and see how much improvement it provides.
I was taught that a split lockwasher does its work in two ways:
1. The "compression spring" action compensates for differential thermal expansion when the screw material is different from the parts it's securing, by "taking up the slack".
2. The ends of the washer's one turn helix are sharp enough to dig into softer material on the underside of the screw head (or nut) and the material on the other side of the washer to resist unscrewing. All the split lockwashers I've seen look like they are made to work that way with right handed fasteners.
Jeff
Reply to
Jeff Wisnia
You are in an area here where you can do a little experimentation. It won't cost much (a few pennies) and you may learn a lot. I'd try your lock washer idea, and I'd also try using one of those box cutters where rather than change the blade you just break off the worn part and extend the blade. Whatever you do, I'd write it up and submit it to your manager once you understand the conclusion you come to. Little incremental improvements in a business can save big money over time (the buzzword is "continual process improvement") and companies like people who think like that. - GWE
Alan Re> Greetings!
Reply to
Grant Erwin
"Grant Erwin" wrote:(clip) companies like people who think like that. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ That's true of a well-run company. However, I used to work for a family-owned company that could not accept input from their employees. They eventually went broke.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Sad statement about the owners, isn't it?
I was trained in a missile facility and received several awards (only on paper) for cost saving ideas. In spite of the fact that I was just an apprentice, they recognized, and were grateful for, improvements in their operation, regardless of the source. Often times the only person to be aware of a given problem was the guy running the job. Who better to look to for suggestions?
Harold
Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos
Alan Reinhart wrote in news:BCF8C868.3B8% snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net:
I would suggest a star washer for this application.
Reply to
Anthony
"Harold & Susan Vordos" wrote in news:40d3f642 snipped-for-privacy@newspeer2.tds.net:
Many companies now have a 'formal' type suggestion program, as they realize that *TONS* of money can be cut out of the cost of manufacturing a product with employee suggestions. You are correct, the only person who *REALLY* knows what's going on is the guy/gal actually doing the job. There is no better source of cost reduction. It may cost some money up front to implement the ideas, and this is where some of the smaller companies may balk, but given a proper ROI analysis, they should see the benefits/drawbacks. Many of the suggestions that prove fruitful are small things, like repositioning a piece of equipment or a better hand tool or something so the operator doesn't have to strain/reach/walk/turn so much. May seem trivial, but if that change allows the operator to make a few more widgets in a shift, that adds up to $$$ at the end of the day in both increased productivity and decreased cost/piece.
Reply to
Anthony
Same suggestion from me, Anthony, as a regular split lock washer will eventually tear up the material underneath it from being installed and un-installed so many times. Star washer (especially if an internal star) would only grip the underside of the head of the screw to prevent it from loosening, but not damage the material the screw is screwed into. Ken.
Reply to
Ken Sterling
Actually it grips the fastener and the material, otherwise how would it lock? A star washer performs its' function exactly the same as a slpit washer but with multiple grips vice a single grip like a split washer.
Shawn
Reply to
Shawn
Okay, I agree, but I still think an internal star would do less "damage" to the "base" (I know, depending on material and a lot of other factors). Seems the OP in this situation is just using the screw to hold a blade in place, and has been instructed to "severely tighten down the screw". Wondering if some type of a toggle clamp would work, to apply the needed pressure to hold the blade in place and prevent, or eliminate, the screw and wear&tear altogether? Ken.
Reply to
Ken Sterling

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