SideWinder Vise Attachment

All:
Just saw this just today, they've supposedly been out for about a year or so. Neat idea IMO. A lot of second op work on the end of long parts i
s done with large heavy angle plates, indicated stop bars, and C-clamps. T his is a much cleaner (and quicker), setup for the right sized parts. Obvi ously you could clamp spacers under the SideWinder to support shorter parts .

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5E3HNHIgPg

I apologize if this has been covered before. I did a topic search on S ideWinder first and didn't see anything.
It's a pretty spicy meatball at $599. I wonder when we can expect a Cheap Chinese Knock-Off, eh Jon? LOL
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I suppose it might be useflu as long as a person is just drilling holes or taking light cuts but I prefer mounting a vise onto an angle plate, much more rigidity and the additional mass provides significantly better vibration dampening.
Curious how (Avion) is doing these days, it's been a while since I've heard from them.
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On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 10:26:14 PM UTC-8, PrecisionmachinisT wrote:

r
PM:
    Yeah, I could envision the harmonics of some heavy passes "twanging" that SideWinder. BUUUT... you could always support the SideWinder with an angle plate, eh? LOL

rd

    I cruised by Avion about 9 months ago. They bought a new CMM for more acc urate, semi-automated inspections. Oh, and they also got a new Laser Tool Presetter that talked directly to the CNC's. These things were probably go tten for ISO 9000/9001 certification. Made me almost want to go back to work part time and play with the new "toys". I was on the verge of blurting out something to that effect... (Pat, for the longest time kept trying to draft me)... but I went home and eventually came to my senses. LOL
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On 11/5/2013 6:04 PM, BottleBob wrote:

I have a 4" Quad vise bolted to a small angle plate that I just clamp in the 6" vise. Setup is very fast! This offers more height though, I just might make a similar mounting plate for mine. Thanks!
Jon
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On Wednesday, November 6, 2013 9:16:18 AM UTC-8, janders wrote:

Jon A:
    The 4" vise stuck to an angle plate sounds like an excellent idea.
    Here are a couple of ideas I had for Kurt vise jaws.
http://i233.photobucket.com/albums/ee126/BottleBob_photo/ViseJaw2.jpg
    The above one was to locate small parts in a sideways vise type feature, with the 6" Kurt movable jaw closing on the part and doing most of the holding. The rod would be threaded of course and have a removable handle.
http://i233.photobucket.com/albums/ee126/BottleBob_photo/Multi-AngleViseJaw.jpg
    On this one the angle could be set with a sine plate on a surface plate, and then installed in the vise. Or if that kind of accuracy wasn't needed you could just set it with a protractor.
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in

just

feature, with the 6" Kurt movable jaw closing on the part and doing most of the holding. The rod would be threaded of course and have a removable handle.

http://i233.photobucket.com/albums/ee126/BottleBob_photo/Multi-AngleViseJ aw.jpg

plate, and then installed in the vise. Or if that kind of accuracy wasn't needed you could just set it with a protractor.

I've been known to double stick tape a 1-2-3 block or similar onto a tall vise jaw.
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On Wednesday, November 6, 2013 4:12:41 PM UTC-8, PrecisionmachinisT wrote:

PM:
    You know, I made a vise stop in the late 70's that was about 1" wide, clam ped to the top of the vise jaw, and hung down the front almost to the bott om of the jaw. The part that hung down was less than 1/8" thick, so small parts could be held square. It was stainless and ground all over. That pu ppy got lost over the years, probably caught someone's eye. :) I should h ave made a bunch of them.
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PM:
You know, I made a vise stop in the late 70's that was about 1" wide, clamped to the top of the vise jaw, and hung down the front almost to the bottom of the jaw. The part that hung down was less than 1/8" thick, so small parts could be held square. It was stainless and ground all over. That puppy got lost over the years, probably caught someone's eye. :) I should have made a bunch of them. --------
I've occasionally thought about marketing a fairly long clamp-on type vise stop from aluminum, one that is machinable....such that a person could easily setup and use when it's necessary to mill completely around a part thats sitting on parallels within in a vise.
Then again, I've got enough things to keep me busy as it is....
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On Wednesday, November 6, 2013 4:12:41 PM UTC-8, PrecisionmachinisT wrote:

PM:
You know, I made a vise stop in the late 70's that was about 1" wide, clamped to the top of the vise jaw, and hung down the front almost to the bottom of the jaw. The part that hung down was less than 1/8" thick, so small parts could be held square. It was stainless and ground all over. That puppy got lost over the years, probably caught someone's eye. :) I should have made a bunch of them. BottleBob http://home.earthlink.net/~bottlbob
=============My ancient lever-operated horizontal mill came with a box of aluminum vise jaw inserts that had been machined to locate the workpieces. Although they wear quickly they are easily refaced, and on a vertical mill the top step will then be exactly parallel to the X axis even if the vise isn't mounted perfectly square or level. jsw
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On 11/6/2013 2:34 PM, BottleBob wrote:

Nice idea. You need a shop and start making stuff... <G>
Always wanted to make a simple sine bar type jaw, just never got around to it. One thing I did for end working of short parts, I ground both ends of the back jaw square. A Pony clamp was used to hold a small hardened and ground plate to the end of the jaw. More than accurate enough for the simple stuff I was doing, and very quick to set up. Unfortunately I sold that vise, swapped out for the next one up in capacity, and forgot to swap the jaws. Now I gotta find someone with a surface grinder that'll let me square off the jaw on this one.
Jon
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I tapped the side of the vise behind the fixed jaw and added a swing-away stop. jsw
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On Tuesday, November 12, 2013 3:15:53 PM UTC-8, janders wrote:

Jon A:
    I suppose I could make one, but what would I do with it? :)

    You could take an angle block... (like one of the following)
http://littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID%53
    Put a couple of dabs of superglue on it and stick it to your vise jaw for an angled stop. Just rap it with a plastic hammer to unstick it when you'r e done. Rub a little Scotchbrite on the glue residue on the bar and vise a nd you'd never know it had been there. You could even stack more than one together to get a more extreme angle.     

    Here's an idea I had for centering different sized pieces in a vise. You' d clamp the plate down behind the solid jaw, and after centering the part w ith the scissors, and clamping it in your vise you could remove the scissor s (slip fit pins), if they would get in the way of machining around your pa rt.
http://i233.photobucket.com/albums/ee126/BottleBob_photo/ScissorsStop.jpg
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On Tue, 5 Nov 2013 18:04:25 -0800 (PST), BottleBob

Pretty useful accessory for some jobs - thanks for posting about it. It looks like something that could be shop-made pretty easily for those of us with vises smaller than 6".
Mike
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