silver solder cast iron?

My neighbor asked me to repair a linkage bar from a vintage printing press. It
is about 3" long, 1" x 3/4" made of cast iron and has a 1/2" hole in each end.
one hole is cross drilled 1/4" for a roll pin. The end is broken off across
this hole. I'm wondering if I should silver solder it or V it out and braze it?
I'm also considering putting aluminum rods it the holes to keep the flux and
brazing material out of them. What is the relationship between the melting
point of aluminum, silver solder, and braze rod?
Engineman1
Reply to
Engineman1
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The broken cast iron carriage gib on my Clausen is about 1" by 1/2" in cross section and I silver soldered it sucessfully.
Reply to
John Ings
Back in the late seventies my brother and I rallied an old R12. When replacing the head gasket we got the head on slightly cocked(only had one alignment dowel pin on those engines) and the distributor drive gear broke. I silver soldered it and rallied it for 3 years with no problem afterwards.
Reply to
clare
A cow-orker of mine brought in a cast-iron pulley from a vintage auto he was restoring. He had broken a chunk off of one of the flanges trying to get it off.
He was bitching and moaning about having to pay a junkyard $50 for a new one so I offered to fix it. I lightly vee-ed the 2 pieces, brazed it with good quality flux-coated rod then touched it up with a right-angle grinder.
It wasn't perfect in my eyes, but he was happy as a clam about it.
Reply to
Jim Stewart
Is this piece is under stress, how did it break? Don't use Aluminum ANYWHERE!!! It WILL alloy! I'd make a new one from steel but if you must repair it braze it after v-cutting it and build up the brass around the joint and it wont break there again! Trust me, I am the KING of broken castings.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
Tom Gardner wrote: (clip) I'd make a new one from steel (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^ That sounds good at first, but it might not be such a good idea. My printing press uses links similar to that to drive the ink ratchet and the water ratchet. If something jams, that link is designed to break, rather than transmit the full driving force to a bunch of more expensive parts. His press may be different, but it's something to consider.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Leo
What kind of printing press do you have?
Jimbo
Reply to
Jimbo
v it out and silver solder it with 45% silver (if you need strength )its much stronger than brazing, all so a lot dearer, but nothing wrong with brazing, (brazing would be my choice) aluminum has the lowest melting point next silver solder highest is brazing
Reply to
Colin French
Jimbo wrote: What kind of printing press do you have? ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ It's an old "three lever" Multilith. The links in question on it are curved, which makes them easier to break, since it puts bending stress on them. I used to be a serviceman for Multi, and I have silver soldered (or brazed, I don't remember) these links on customers' machines. I always hated to leave a customer "down" waiting for parts.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
On Fri, 09 Jan 2004 13:23:09 -0800, Jim Stewart vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
hmmmm...and how long have you had this typo problem?...
....orked a cow once during my Uni days. Didn't like it.
**************************************************** sorry remove ns from my header address to reply via email
I was frightened by the idea of a conspiracy that was causing it all. But then I was terrified that maybe there was no plan, really. Is this unpleasant mess all a mistake?
Reply to
Old Nick
Silver solder is not good at all for building up surfaces, therefore "V" ing the break is not a great idea. One is much farther ahead to simply clean it well and make sure it will go back together intimately, providing the maximum amount of surface area for the repair. The V lends nothing to the operation that is positive for soldering. If available, a quick sand or bead blast is all that would be required for a good joint if silver solder is properly applied. It goes without saying that the joint should be free of oils and grease.
Harold
Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos
It's an old usenet joke. Here's the entry from the usenet Jargon Dictionary:
cow orker n. [Usenet] n. fortuitous typo for co-worker, widely used in Usenet, with perhaps a hint that orking cows is illegal. This term was popularized by Scott Adams (the creator of Dilbert) but already appears in the January 1996 version of the scary devil monastery FAQ. There are plausible reports that it was in use on talk.bizarre as early as 1992. Compare hing, grilf, filk, newsfroup.
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Reply to
John Ings
What he said. If you want more info on silver "solder" check out
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Ted
Reply to
Ted Edwards
This is inaccurate. Years of research sorting punched cards of old usenet (ok, ok, 5 minutes with google) revealed the earliest mention was over on alt.sca on Aug 11 1989 by a Mr Anderson in his sig.
Hmm, some later searches trying to turn up earlier results on mailing list archives found only a correct version of the above jargon dictionary.
It seems to have become popular on talk.bizarre
Reply to
Ian Stirling
On Sat, 10 Jan 2004 04:28:22 -0800, John Ings vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
Seriously?
Awwwh crap!
Oh well. at least I can sleep easy knowing that I did think it up myself, without reading it before :-<
......but I _orked a cow_.........Uni was _years_ ago! 1990...HAH!
**************************************************** sorry remove ns from my header address to reply via email
I was frightened by the idea of a conspiracy that was causing it all. But then I was terrified that maybe there was no plan, really. Is this unpleasant mess all a mistake?
Reply to
Old Nick

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