Slick tool for "chip in the eye" syndrome

Got a small chip in my eye and was about to head upstairs to remove it and just happened to notice an old dental mirror on the bench.
This is a concave mirror that magnifies, has a focal distance of approx 2". Held this up to my eye in an area with decent ambient light, and viola, it was a total piece of cake to gently swipe the chip out with a Q-tip. This beats the hell out of leaning over the sink and trying to shine a flashlight in the affected eye while trying to find and remove the particle. Don't know if I'd want to try to pull an imbedded particle, but for something just sitting on the eye, this makes it really really easy. Everyone working with metal or wood ought to have one of these handy.
And for the safety nannies, yes, I was wearing safety glasses...
Jon
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Yea,those and similar mirrors work great. I got an "eye mirror" from american science and surplus for about 2 bucks. Front surface concave mirror that lets you see every nasty thing in your eye or those things growing on your nose you didn't know about. No shop should be without one. Saved me many a time when something felt like it was in my eye but couldn't be seen any other way.
Koz
Jon Anderson wrote:

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I work in a place full of ophthalmologists but whenever I get something in my eye at work I prefer to remove it myself. I am the biggest wuss when it comes to letting anyone - no matter how qualified they are - poke around in my eye. My chief likes to roll your eyelids back and I hate that. I would make a very poor soldier.
However, if I may offer some completely unqualified advice...if you do get something really stuck in there it is best to have it taken out by a medical person because if you scratch the cornea ( the clear covering over your iris and pupil ) while it will heal up it never quite goes back to how it was originally.
Dean.
Don't know if I'd want to try to pull an imbedded

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Something else that works fine for getting a chip or other item out of the eye is a piece of horse tail. I had a chip adhere to my eye one time and the Dr, opened up what appeared to be a simple loop of fine material . He twirled it together at the ends, and fashined a loop that resembled a noose, and simply drug it accross the eyeball. You could actually feel the piece contacting the chip, and getting pulled off. I used to keep a few strands of hair from the horses we had, in a small stoppered up test tube for emergency chip removal, but presently don't have a clue where there at. But at least I still have access to a horse ;-) When I asked him about the device he simply replied it is a pretty darn good instrument for coming from such a simple source....a strand of horse tail hair. Then the receptionist / clerk at the desk ruined my day when she said that will be $120.00......guess it could have been worse though.
On Mon, 01 Sep 2003 11:49:56 -0700, Jon Anderson

-- Visit my website: http://www.frugalmachinist.com Contents: foundry and general metal working and lots of related projects. Regards Roy aka Chipmaker // Foxeye Opinions are strictly those of my wife....I have had no input whatsoever. Remove capital A from chipmAkr for correct email address
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We normally try to help each other out with the chip or dirt in the eye gig. It feels a bit strange, but once you get past the gay issue, a guy helpin with a visor on can see alot better than you can. :)
Bing
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Or you could do what the old native american mother's did for their kids and lick the speck out of the other guy's eye :)
Koz
Bing wrote:

</pre> <blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">Got a small chip in my eye and was about to head upstairs to remove it and just happened to notice an old dental mirror on the bench. This is a concave mirror that magnifies, has a focal distance of approx 2". Held this up to my eye in an area with decent ambient light, and viola, it was a total piece of cake to gently swipe the chip out with a Q-tip. This beats the hell out of leaning over the sink and trying to shine a flashlight in the affected eye while trying to find and remove the particle. Don't know if I'd want to try to pull an imbedded particle, but for something just sitting on the eye, this makes it really really easy. Everyone working with metal or wood ought to have one of these handy.
And for the safety nannies, yes, I was wearing safety glasses... </pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap=""><!----> We normally try to help each other out with the chip or dirt in the eye gig. It feels a bit strange, but once you get past the gay issue, a guy helpin with a visor on can see alot better than you can. :)
Bing
</pre> </blockquote> <br> </body> </html>
--------------060604060802060108030600--
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What I use quite a bit is a book match. When you tear the match out the torn end has a bunch of little fuzzes on it. Usually all you have to do is touch the particle in your eye and it sticks to it.
Richard W.
Got a small chip in my eye and was about to head upstairs to remove it and just happened to notice an old dental mirror on the bench. This is a concave mirror that magnifies, has a focal distance of approx 2". Held this up to my eye in an area with decent ambient light, and viola, it was a total piece of cake to gently swipe the chip out with a Q-tip. This beats the hell out of leaning over the sink and trying to shine a flashlight in the affected eye while trying to find and remove the particle. Don't know if I'd want to try to pull an imbedded particle, but for something just sitting on the eye, this makes it really really easy. Everyone working with metal or wood ought to have one of these handy.
And for the safety nannies, yes, I was wearing safety glasses...
We normally try to help each other out with the chip or dirt in the eye gig. It feels a bit strange, but once you get past the gay issue, a guy helpin with a visor on can see alot better than you can. :)
Bing
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Chew the fuzzy end to get it sticky with YOUR saliva and it easily grabs stuff out of your eye.
--
free men own guns - slaves don't
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says...

Aack. There was a real eye doctor who posted here on occasion, I think he's passed out from angst.
FWIW the story about the Gerstner toolboxes is along those lines. The mirror is in the top lid for exactly this reason, that back in the old days the sanitary facilities in most shops were primitive at best, and if you needed to get something out of your eye the best way to see it was right at your toolbox, in that mirror. First surface IIRC.
It's not really there for combing yer hair.
Jim
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No, I'm still here and conscious, more or less.
Saliva in the eye isn't very high on the list of things that gross me out. There are many contact lens wearers who pop their lenses into their mouths for a quick cleaning or rehydration. Here's some free advice: don't do that. Use your dog's mouth instead, it's a lot cleaner than yours.
--
Ted Bennett
Portland OR
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Bennett says...

Ah, I still recall your excellent discussion on the rust ring eraser tool. Thanks.

I knew a lady who did that (her mouth, not her dogs...) but she had a variety of other habits that were equally as horrifying. The same night she did that, she washed down four birth control pills with a shot of bourbon. "Must have forgotten these...."
Jim
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Not my dog - he just found the 'hide it away for a rainy way' chunk of something - it was under the table in the office - back in the corner. Who knows how long it sat there - he came in hunting it out - finally found it or one... Figure it had to age a bit.
My Elk Hound used to take a chunk of cheese or bone and dig a hole & wait for a week or so. Then dig it out and slobber it down green mold and all. (Good ole days).
Martin
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Martin Eastburn, Barbara Eastburn
@ home at Lion's Lair with our computer snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net
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On Wed, 03 Sep 2003 01:17:57 GMT, someone who calls themselves Ted

Unfortunately, anything you put in a dog's mouth usually isn't seen again until it comes out the other end. And that can't /possibly/ be very sanitary... ;-)
I wore soft contacts for three or four months, right up till the first time one popped out as I was 3/4 of the way up climbing a phone pole on gaffs. -2.75 & -3.25 nearsighted. Once I managed to get back on the ground safely (climbing by braille & sweating bricks), the contact lenses went back in their case and never came out again...
--<< Bruce >>--
--
Bruce L. Bergman, POB 394, Woodland Hills CA 91365, USA
Electrician, Westend Electric (#726700) Agoura, CA
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Larry Jaques wrote: (clip) (BTW, it's "Voil!") ^^^^^^^^^^^ I think a viola bow is strung with horse hair. So, he meant that a viola could be used for eye first-aid. <g>
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On Tue, 02 Sep 2003 04:24:49 GMT, "Leo Lichtman"

OK, that resinates[sic] with me now. <groan>
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If you get a chip from steel or iron in your eye, a magnet will get them out real quick usually. Old boy who taught at the Community College said " all us young guys should have a magnet in our tool box for just such an occasion.
Michael no xx's in address
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pixelated:

Oops, slip of the finner. Alt+0224, not 0225. I sit corrected. (Too lazy to stand.)
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wrote:

High their:
This bit about 'viola' reminds me about some programming folklore that, AFAIK, is not documented anywhere, but deserves to be (in my opinion).
In the early days (BC - before compilers) an anonymous programmer cobbled together a huge, badly-designed, complicated, spaghetti-code assembly-language program, loaded with poorly nested loops and replete with illegal 'go-to's'. Finally, after many many interminable debugging sessions, he managed to get the wretched monstrosity to limp around. In triumph, he changed the last label in the program, renaming it 'voila'. But he was a poor speller, so he entered 'viola' instead. So, it became a tradition, in that shop, (and elsewhere)that the last label in an assembly-language program should always be 'viola'.
Mb-A
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I always try to protect my eyes so it was with considerable shock when I woke and looked in the mirror the other morning. About 50% of the white of my right eye was a mass of blood. My better half went off the edge when she saw it and for the life of me I could not understand how I had done this thing to my eye.
My doctor instantly put my mind at rest. She explained that it is not uncommon to rupture blood vessels in the eye. (sort of a stroke in the eye, if you will) Brought on normally by the strain of a cough or sneeze or in some cases by high blood pressure (etc)
Thankfully it left just about as quickly as it arrived with no adverse effects.
Bill D
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Back in the days when men were men, and women were glad of it, and machinists turned handles instead of pushing buttons, we had another way to deal with splinters. We'd haul out the ol' die grinder, and just grind away at wherever it hurt until the sparks stopped. A belt sander worked good too, if the appropriate body part was properly shaped for accessiblity.
It didn't always work perfectly, of course. I remember how mad nine-finger Newton got, the day he found out that aluminum splinters don't make sparks. Oh, well. Live and learn.
KG
Jon Anderson wrote:

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