slitting spring bronze

Ok, 'solutions guys'...
I have some 0.010" phosphor bronze (spring temper) in rolls 6" wide x 80" long.
I need to cleanly slit some 3/8" strips x 80" from this without any edge distortion.
We tried taking one a sheet metal house that had a long scissor-type shear, and it cut it, but also curled the edge too much for our application. It has to wind flat in a coil when finished.
I've tried sheet metal hand shears without much joy, a nibbler just chews it, and sawing it on anything we've got is impossible.
We must not heat it. Also cost is an issue, or I'd have it done at a waterjet and laser house down the road, but they want a couple-hundred just to set up a job. For only five strips, that's not in budget.
A virgin roll has perfect edges, and rolls tightly. The mill that makes the rolls from larger sheet stock cannot go narrower than 1".
Any ideas?
Thanks, Lloyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

Surface grinder with thin abrasive cutoff wheel.
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" wrote:

Can you roll it up on some sacrificial form (dowel?), secure it (hose clamps?) and then cut it with a slitting saw in a mill?
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Yeah, perhaps. That was one thought that already came to mind, but I don't have any experience sawing that stuff (it's tougher than a cypress heart). It's also thin, so I'm not sure we aren't going to end up snagging and lifting layers, even if we cut in climb.
But that's one idea certainly on the table (so to speak).
Maybe the same idea coupled with the abrasive wheel in the prior suggestion???
Lloyd
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On Mon, 20 May 2013 12:36:54 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

If you can roll it up, you have a candidate for a reasonably-priced wire EDM job.
It should be neat, but be aware that there may be a wire-breakage problem from the intermittant conductivity. Maybe, maybe not. If the EDM operator knows his stuff, he should be able to do it without a problem.
Setup would be minimal.
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That makes me wonder if a wire saw would also work, assuming it was appropriately immobilized (would casting the roll in machinable wax or one of the low-temp fixturing alloys (eg, woods metal) be too hot? Would the fixturing alloys contaminate it? I don't know...just thinking about ways to take the flex out of it for a clean cut.)
I wonder if putting it inside a pipe or bored hole and letting its own spring tension do most of the clamping would be best - then you could cut off a section of pipe with a section of spring-bronze rolled up in it, and it would not be (quite) as prone to uncoiling as you cut. I still suspect that some additional immobilization (such as wax casting) would reduce Murphy's access to the process.
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" wrote:

Perhaps a nice ultra thin diamond wheel cut under coolant?
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Do you know how one would load up cutting a fairly gummy non-ferrous metal? (I don't).
Lloyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" wrote:

I wouldn't think that a spring temper bronze cut under coolant would be gummy.
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Maybe not. I just don't have any experience cutting it. I cut oilite all the time, but that's not the same creature.
Lloyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

I have used a thin abrasive cut-off wheel in a dremel for cutting shims. With light pressure the edge does not deform. Keep it wet to keep it cool. Cutting by hand does not leave a very straight edge, but maybe you can rig up a guide. Although 80" would take a long time and several wheels.
You could try gluing it to a sacrificial board and using a slitting saw in a mill.
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It's 80" long. I don't have a mill with X-travel that long. If I did that, I'd have to run it through some guides by hand, like ripping on a table saw.
That last is another suggestion that's been profered. Screw two waste sheets together clamping (and maybe also gluing) the work between... then rip it with a brand new carbide blade and slow feed. ??? Of course, you'd lose the 'clamping' behind the cut; but maybe that's not an issue.
The length, unrolled, is the bugger-bear for handling it flat.
LLoyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

How about roll it onto a tube, put the tube in a lathe, and cut with a thin abrasive wheel in a tool post grinder. I have a little adapter that holds a dremel on the tool post.
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" wrote:

Can you run that through a pair of rollers to flatten it out? It could even start the curve for the coil you want to make.
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I guess I could find a roller. The sheared edge was also rough. We'd have to dress it after flattening.
And we do not want it pre-curved. The purpose here is to keep it under tension so that when it un-winds a little (about one turn on a 2.5" hub), it stays flat-wound and self-supporting.
It's for a grounding strap on a rotary table. The table can only rotate 355 degrees, but house rules don't allow "wiper" type ground bonds in this kind of environment. 'Has to be metal-to-metal and bonded with a bolt.
The length of 80" was selected (stock sizes, so you picks what they carries) because that allows the strip to unwind a minimal amount in diameter with an approximately 10" length change.
Lloyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" wrote:

You can't use a flat, tinned copper braid for a ground strap?
<http://products.conwire.com/item/flat-tinned-copper-braid-2/flat-tinned-copper-braid/1393?&plpver 01&origin=keyword&by=prod&filter=0>
I tin the ends and drill a hole through the now solid area. I use RMA flux, and clean it well but you can also crimp a lug on each end.
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I could, but there's no means to support the length of braid as it uncoils. If it sags onto the fixed equipment, there will be a snag.
The ONLY reason we elected to go with the bronze is because in simple tests, it would self-support from just one end for a distance of about 6" from the support point.
If we had any means whatsoever to prevent the coil from sagging when it loosened, I'd be using stainless steel braid with crimped fixturing.
Lloyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" wrote:

Thin, half inch heat shrink or similar plastic tubing will keep it from snagging. A small spring can hold up the center. There are plenty of ways to do it.
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plenty

You'd have to see the design, which I cannot show you. The spring is nix for problems of mounting and movement, and PVC in any form is not permitted.
Believe me when I say we explored that possibility at length.
LLoyd
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On Mon, 20 May 2013 19:13:26 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

I agree
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