slitting spring bronze


plenty

Sorry, Gunner (and the op who posted that). You can't possibly know the physical arrangement. We've probably thought of a hundred ways you've never imagined. There are NOT 'plenty of ways to do it', or we'd have already done it one of those easier ways.
We're having trouble slitting bronze because we don't have the right tools. Were not dumb.
Lloyd
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On Tue, 21 May 2013 06:04:43 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

Sorry Lloyd. Just trying to help. My appologies.
Gunner
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No harm done, Gunner.
Sometimes I get cranky at folks presuming they know how a machine is built without seeing it or knowing the constraints under which we're required to work when building stuff for explosives manufacturers. <G>
Lloyd
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Like no pinch points for pressure-sensitive materials . Hey Lloyd , will HMX DDT ?
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Actually, it burns pretty politely until it's shocked strongly. <G> Lloyd
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On Tue, 21 May 2013 18:51:04 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

I hear C4 is great campfire starter, too. (What brilliant person first thought of that one, eh?)
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On Tue, 21 May 2013 21:21:44 -0700, Larry Jaques

The first GI that was wet, cold and hungry.
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wrote:

"I think I'll light my high-explosive plastique on fire." is not a sane concept, sir. Even a super-small test piece would have blown his hands clean off if he guessed wrong about it not exploding. <shrug> I mean, you wouldn't just shave a slice off your stick of dynamite to start a fire, would you? And it's less explosive.
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Horse crap and bull dingles, Larry. C-4 is mostly RDX, waxes, oils, and dioctyl adapate. RDX, like HMX, burns quietly unless shocked by an initiator. C-4 burns like a fast version of sterno, with a perfectly quiet blue flame (tiniest bit of sizzle), no soot, and no explosions.
To my knowlege, the US military does not employ any HE materials that will DDT under open-air burning of small quantities. Bets are off if you light a 100lb pile of the stuff.
And yes, even dynamite can burn, if it's actually dynamite and not one of the AN 'dynamite-like' stuffs, and it has a high-enough nitro content. The lower 15% stuff won't burn for shit (or explode when you try to ignite it). Diatomacious earth/clay/compacted sawdust has a tendency not to burn very vigorously.
Of course, you wouldn't know this, but even nitroglycerine (IF very pure and free of any acids or undesirable organic ligands from nitration) burns like vigorous alcohol. In this case, it would be tempting fate to arrange a puddle of it, and ignite it by hand.
An urban legend I have not confirmed (but is probably true) has the chemist who first compounded TNT casting an ashtray of the stuff, just to demonstrate how insensitive it was.
I've cooked many a C-rat and LRPs on C-4. I still have all my digits.
Lloyd
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On Wed, 22 May 2013 09:51:53 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

Does every new soldier know all of that?

Fear not. I won't try it. <g>

OK, but I'll bet you either researched it prior to burning it, or took someone else's demonstration of burning it before you lit your own C4, Lloyd.
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By the time they've handled any, yep... every man above them who's ever done will (faithfully) pass it on.

Nope... took it on faith. One thing a well-indoctrinated soldier does is believe what he's told by anyone with one more stripe than his. He believes, because that's part of his job description.
Lloyd
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On 5/22/2013 11:06 AM, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Same here.
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On Wed, 22 May 2013 08:50:04 -0700, Larry Jaques

\It was a common way to heat coffee or rations during the Vietnam era, at least among the Marines. 'Don't know about the army.
My cousin, a Marine sniper, told me much the same story as the one Lloyd related above. Like you, I expressed concern that he was carrying a kilo of it in his pack when he went out on sniper missions. Then he explained that it really was for heating coffee. <g>
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On Wed, 22 May 2013 06:59:54 -0700, Larry Jaques

Yes..dynamite burns well, though not as fast as C4
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15% won't. The low-percentage heaving grades have so much inert filler as to render them impervious to anything but a cap -- except for those that are 'filled' with nitrocellulose for gas production. Those burn like a candle.
Lloyd
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On Wed, 22 May 2013 15:05:27 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

Ive never used 15%, only 30 (rarely) and 60% most often.
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wrote:

that fire or shock could detonate it.
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Heh!
Larry, "shock" IS what detonates it. But not the sort of shock it would get from dropping, or even pounding a stick (not on a steel plate) with a hammer.
Detonators' and blasting caps' primary purpose is to supply a shock of such a magnitude and rise time that it initiates explosive decomposition of the compound your using for blasting.
Some materials (most 'hand-carry' HEs) are totally insensitive to mishandling, and only capable of being detonated with a cap or detonator/booster, or with fire in a LARGE mass.
The old saw about "sweating" dynamite is true. If you see a stick of old stuff with glistening yellow droplets on the outside, then avoid it. The NG has migrated through the paper to the surface; and NOW it's sensitive to handling shock!
That happens rarely today. Most "dynamites" aren't even Dynamite, any more (which is nitroglycerine dispersed in inert fillers and gas- producing compounds). Most modern _so_called_ "dynamites" are ammonium nitrate/metal/oil/water emulsions that don't initiate at all - ever - without a strong cap or a booster.
Lloyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> fired this volley in

decomposition

I should add this:
Blasting caps are made with "primary explosives". These chemicals DO detonate instantly upon being set on fire. They require no shock -- so a fuse or an electrical resistance wire heater is enough. (yes, they're also sensitive to mechanical shock).
It's the detonation of the cap which sets off the detonation of the larger mass of high explosive, like C-4.
Caps use things similar to what's in percussion caps for firearms (but there are several compounds that work better for blasting, and would be injurious to the bores of guns, because of corrosion issues).
LLoyd
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On Wed, 22 May 2013 16:50:18 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

Yes, I knew that much. ;)

Yeah, I've seen that a lot in westerns and knew it was true, too.

Thanks for the info.
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