stainless steel

What designates stainless as food grade?
Reply to
kklein
Loading thread data ...
With a former employer, I have seen 300-series and 400-series stainless steel alloys both used in food grade applications. Also the company used several aluminum alloys and hot-dip-tin-coated cast iron.
More critical than the actual alloy was that the stainless steel did not have porosity. Some part designs were cast and the main thing we tried to acheive was lack of porosity which could trap food particles and cause bacteria formation. I suppose this was also important in welded parts but I worked in the foundry.
Mark
Reply to
Mark
Probably an ASTM spec. FWIW, 304 and 316 are most used, AFAIK.
Tim
-- "I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!" - Homer Simpson Website @
formatting link

Reply to
Tim Williams
Some grades are acceptable ONLY for milk products, also. 304, I believe, but don't quote me unless I guessed right.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
304 can discolor with some cleaners. A lot of what constitutes sanitary has to do with fabrication, polishing, gasket compounds, and on and on. Here's a site you can look over, although like a lot of standards outfits, it's pretty bad. Try the FAQ's, plus the Links page has links to the FDA and US Dept. of Agriculture.
Pete Keillor
Reply to
Peter T. Keillor III
what would be a food grade aluminum for use in a mustard dispenser?
Reply to
williamhenry
something very non-reactive like 1100.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
I don't know of one specifically for this application.
Mark
Reply to
Mark
Pure, aluminum is least corroded by food products, as opposed to aluminum alloys.
Mark wrote:
Reply to
Jerry J. Wass

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.