Steel recommendations for a chuck mounting plate

I was looking into mounting a 4" (or maybe 5") chuck on a rotary
table by mounting the chuck to a 6" round of 1/2" steel. Since this is
not for a lathe, I don't need the bleeding edge. Sounds like a job for 1018.
I can get the steel cut down at Liebovich Steel and Aluminum down in
Rockford. Would it be worth getting it ground as well, or could I face
it in the lathe so it's parallel enough?
Reply to
Louis Ohland
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Louis Ohland wrote in news:T0O5i.67$ snipped-for-privacy@newsfe06.lga:
That depends largely on the condition of the lathe and the lathe chuck. You could face one side then mount it onto your rotary table and face mill the other side right on the rotary table in the mill it will be used on. If you rotate the table while face milling it by traversing the table, it will be about as flat and parallel to the locating side as you can get. The perpendicularity of the OD to the face won't be there, but probably don't need to be.
Reply to
D Murphy
I would make it out of cast iron. Cast iron is much less sensible to dings.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
I would face it in your lathe if the lathe is in decent shape.
Face one side.
set up three stops in the T slot grooves of the chuck.. use a T nut in the slots and a washer and retaing nut to lock the bolts to the chuck. true up the heads of the bolts by taking a light cut until all three clean up.
Put the faced side against the bolts and tighten the chuck. Make sure you lightly tap the piece so it is solid against the bolts.
You could also use three aluminum blocks mounted on the chuck for stops and cut them. Save everything you will need it again some time.
John
Reply to
john
Interesting way to get things square.
john wrote:
Reply to
Louis Ohland
That is a common practice on manual as well as cnc Lathes. If you have multiple parts, you just set your carriage stop and go. On a cnc, you just push the button.
John
Reply to
john
Louis Ohland wrote in news:T0O5i.67$ snipped-for-privacy@newsfe06.lga:
One note of caution: If you are going to put bolt holes in the part, do your facing _after_ putting in the bolt holes, as drilling or tapping will raise an area around each hole.
Reply to
Anthony
If he chanfers it with a countersink there should be no problem... I would recommend it anyway because if the plate is tapped the tightened bolt will pull up the metal around the hole and tje rest of the plate will not be perfectly tight. Id rather facecut a plate with no holes in it if I'm trying to get it flat.
John
Reply to
john
Good stuff. I don't intend to tap the plate, I will drill four holes at 90 degrees for the 7/16th T bolts. The plate will be fastened down to the rotary table top.
The chuck will be fastened to the plate. I'll counterbore for the machine bolt heads so the bottom of the plate won't have any protrusions.
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john wrote:
Reply to
Louis Ohland

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