VFD programming

I grabbed an old motor off the shelf and wired it up to test
programming of the Automation Direct GS2 drive for my son's lathe
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I've used a VFD on my 10EE for years and set decel time to 0.5
seconds. Works great for stuff like threading where you want to stop
quickly. but I need to remember to first slow the lathe before
stopping or it will kick the drive out (OVC alarm)
I'd like to avoid my son having to slow the lathe before stopping. I
see this control has two decel times possible (P1.06 1.07 1.08) and
something called autoadjustable decel (P6.06), also "S" curve decel
(P1.04) and DC injection(P1.21) My understanding is incomplete here.
I'd like to stop the lathe as fast as possible from any speed without
over current kickouts. Does anyone have knowledge of how to set these
parameters?
PS a brake resistor is installed.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
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Autoadjustable deceleration (keeping bus voltage high but not exceeding the limit during deceleration) seems like a great idea, especially when you have a lot of inertia.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus24233
Ignoramus24233 fired this volley in news:UPadnWjryNyXx-DOnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com:
I've got a GS2 manual in the shop. I have two of them in service, so the manual's probably in the base of one of the machines.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
I'd play with the p6.06 and see how it behaves, or call AD and ask for a better explanation of the function than the one in the manual. If the drive senses instantaneous motor current, and adjusts the decel rate accordingly, it should help.
The peak current with the S-curve will probably increase. With a VFD, DC injection braking is usually only used to decelerate the motor from a couple Hz down to zero, I don't think it'll make much difference. The drive can do a better job of controlling the decel by ramping down the frequency than the DC injection will.
Reply to
Ned Simmons

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