what happens to leftover concrete?

jk wrote:


First you have to sort them by frequency, then work on phasing them. ;-)
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faze [feyz] [feyz] Show IPA verb (used with object), fazed, faz·ing. to cause to be disturbed or disconcerted; daunt: The worst insults cannot faze him.
Of course, beavers are kind of random acting, so it's hard to phase them.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Martin Eastburn wrote:

It's very difficult to phase beavers. ;-)
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On 2/18/2012 10:59 AM, rangerssuck wrote:

Boy, there sure is a lot of misinformation available here.
There are many variables in the concrete business. It is not unusual to have a cubic yard or more of leftover concrete in the truck after the pour. The driver has a huge obligation to clean all chutes, hopper, and any splatter on the rear of the truck before he goes back on the street - this has more to do with broken windshields and law suits. He dumps whatever water he has left into the drum with the left over concrete if there is any chance of it setting up before he gets back to the yard. If it happens to be a yard that casts the big blocks, they will use up the concrete making them if there is time. These blocks are 2' x 2' x 4' with tongue and groove surfaces so they can be stacked with a piece of heavy wire rope cast in the top for a lifting eye. These blocks take 16 CF (about .6 of CY) and weigh between 2000 and 2500 #. When a yard is really busy there is often not time to deal with these and not all yards even make them. The driver empties the truck in a designated area of their yard. The EPA requires that they hold the runoff water. The left overs are junk that is not usable for anything in the concrete business. It is usually referred to as "wash out". If you have a parking lot or some other use for the material, they will usually sell it far cheaper than you can even buy #57 stone. You will need your own dump truck and make an arrangement with the yard to load.
We have sometimes received concrete so fresh we could have finished it. There is no or very little picking and choosing. Whatever the loader scoops up is what you get. It may have hardened lumps, etc. It is all material that breaks fairly easy under track equipment, usually even a backhoe. It makes a fantastic fill material and even finish road or parking surface. Even though the cement has turned hard, it will sort of re powder under the machines and the stuff gets really hard after some rain and grading. It is not homogenous concrete, but it is a dense and solid surface.
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Though I hadn't thought about usding it to cast those big blocks, it sure makes sense. Selling it as fill or dry-paving material is sort of what I expected. I used to rent a house up in Danby-4-corners, VT, where the big employer is the marble mine. Everything in that town is paved with marble chips & dust.
I wonder if anyone has sucsessfully used the washout as part of a concrete mix, after crushing it to sand-sized particles? Or, maybe it's not tough enough for that.
I'm surprised by the number of responses I got on this. They all more- or-less agree, but there's clearly some varioatons on the theme. Next time I'm in the area, I'll drop by the local concrete yard and ask them what they do.
And haven't you guys heard of the new omniphase beavers? They're self adjusting and come in impedance-matched pairs.
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On 2/19/2012 2:29 AM, rangerssuck wrote:

We dont get left overs here where I live ,the concrete supplier has batching trucks that mix the concrete when they get to the site . It is mixed as it come out of the chute ,separtate containers for cement powder , gravel , sand and water .The mix can be adjusted by variaying the ingredients The mix is measured by a computer as it is discharged ,you only pay for exactly what you use.
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Where are you Kev - over east?
AFAIK here on the west it's all premixed in the truck.
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On 2/20/2012 9:34 PM, Dennis wrote:

Katherine, NT . The concrete supplier has two batching trucks . We do have a supplier that has bowl trucks , but only get jobs when the batching trucks are flat out. The bowl trucks you have to order to the nearest .5 of a cubic metre any left over is waste unless you have something formed up to use the extra , you pay for it anyway.
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On Tue, 21 Feb 2012 19:22:10 +0930, "Kevin(Bluey)"

Well, there's your problem! ;-P You're a wide spot in the road with filling stations, supermarkets, and the junction of Stuart Hwy and Victoria Hwy... (Nothing wrong with that, of course - they had to put it somewhere, and that's where the easy paths met.) A quick search says Population ~10,100.
Consider yourselves lucky you're big enough to keep a concrete yard and the Batching trucks busy. Most small towns it's mix it yourself.
Just look at all the moving parts and wear items on that Batching truck, with the rubber conveyor-belting mixing chute and mixing augur and all the hydraulic motors and dispensing augurs for the ingredients, and everything has to work... Maintenance Intensive. I'll betcha they are jury-rigging things during the day as something fails or wears through, then getting them fixed at least once a week. We can get a few Batching Trucks in Los Angeles and the far-flung suburbs, but pre-mix (or "Transit Mixed") is the norm.
Most little batches like that they have a stationary Batching Mixer at the rental yard, they dispense into a 2-yard two-axle tilt-dump or mixing (little drum & gas engine) trailer, and you tow it to the job and dump it yourself.
--<< Bruce >>--
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My abutting neighbor makes precast, prestressed bridge components. His leftover concrete goes directly into my Kubota bucket (about 1/2 yard capacity) and then directly into forms I have had ready and waiting. Have poured many lineal feet of walkways, door stoops etc. Downside is that he uses high strength fast setting concrete, and it takes me about 4-5 minutes to hurry back to my place, pour and finish real quickly. Adding water slows it down but weakens it.
My next project will be precast decorative fence posts.
Ivan Vegvary
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On Tue, 21 Feb 2012 07:08:26 -0800 (PST), Ivan Vegvary
leftover concrete goes directly into my Kubota bucket (about 1/2 yard capacity) and then directly into forms I have had ready and waiting. Have poured many lineal feet of walkways, door stoops etc. Downside is that he uses high strength fast setting concrete, and it takes me about 4-5 minutes to hurry back to my place, pour and finish real quickly. Adding water slows it down but weakens it.

No, his secondary business (in partnership with you) should be making precast concrete parking bumpers, precast door and window header beams for block buildings (Pre-stressed and Structurally Rated like the bridge beams) and decorative fence posts. Or Garden Gnomes and Birdbaths and Garden Statuary if you have a way to paint them up.
Point being, skip the Kubota bucket step and do them right there at the mixer. Make up a bunch of molds and pre-make the rebar that goes inside on welding jigs, and develop the tooling to fill and vibrate them quickly, and set them off in the corner to cure.
One of his guys can take 5 minutes to fill the little molds with the leftovers after they fill the big molds they're making for the day.
And make a little powered conveyor belt for the molds that's right at the output chute of his mixing system. They can stick prepared molds on one end of the belt, then fill and advance, fill and advance, till they run out of leftover concrete.
(HINT) Mold the company name into parking bumpers and stepping stones, and now they're also useful as Promotional Materials...
Oh, and Ivan? Please insert line breaks so we don't have to word wrap. 70-character line break is about right, that allows for nested quotes.
--<< Bruce >>--
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rangerssuck wrote:

Theyput it in a tub or bucket along with the feet of people who ask too many questions*. When it sets up, they throw them in the ocean.
*Questions like: what happens to leftover concrete?
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Paul Hovnanian mailto: snipped-for-privacy@Hovnanian.com
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On Saturday, February 18, 2012 8:59:17 AM UTC-8, rangerssuck wrote:

I could use it where can i contact someone for the cement?
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On Saturday, February 18, 2012 8:59:17 AM UTC-8, rangerssuck wrote:

The remnants ARE kept motile with extra water until they get to a place where they may dump it. There are companies, *usually* paving or landmoving firms, that will allow the trucks to "wash out" in a special pit reserved for that purpose.
The material remaining is called "washout". It's kept stirred and broken up in the pit, sometimes mixed with soil and/or more gravel, then sold as a road base material. Except for its being dusty when dry, it's also a superior driveway material -- strong, resists wear, and will stabilize soils not conducive to building a driveway from straight asphalt.
A lot of folks will put it down and just keep it watered with a little calcium chloride, or they'll top (say) 6" of compacted washout with a thin cap of asphalt paving.
I've got 430 feet of it as a driveway, 8" deep (Sandy clay underneath). It's a great driveway.
Lloyd
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On Sat, 7 Jun 2014 12:15:55 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Where I live if there is a small amount, at least what the truck driver considers small, they dump it on the ground and expect the homeowner to deal with it. If there is more thae bring it back to the plant to make "ecology blocks". Ecology blocks are large rectangular blocks with a key cast into the top and a keyway cast into the bottom. They are use to hold back hillsides and the like. Oftentimes you can see the different layers of concrete, indicating multiple pours. ERS
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On Sat, 07 Jun 2014 12:34:29 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

Ditto here.
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On 06/07/2014 12:15 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Probably the same place you contact about replying to a two plus year old post.
Jon
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On 6/7/2014 3:15 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Italian footwear?
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On 6/7/2014 2:15 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Remember Concrete or cement trucks only make money delivery.
When one completes delivery they are back to be re-loaded.
Now if there is a large part - might have a plan at home or anothers place.
Either way if there is daylight the concrete truck is running to / from the plant to somewhere. A partial load just saves the company a bit but sometimes they dump it and sent it to a crusher.
I had 64 loads of concrete here - and they only used 4 trucks. Once started, they kept a continuous pour until the entire foundation was done. Big and with deep piers and normal rings and crosses. It was also 7K not the 6k stuff - so it hardens a bit faster.
Martin
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The companies around here usually will fill your forms and if there is any left the driver will do one of two things. Either say something like 1/4 yard 20 minutes or you have 20 minutes, Or they will ask you where they can wash-out.
The first option basically means you can toss together a form FAST and pour the rest for a step or similar. I know the outfits around here normally mix VERY close to order, so you want to plan ahead.
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Steve W.

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I just (had) placed and finished a 10yd job which I formed. The guy ordered the load, and when they finished, they had only "clinkers" in the barrel. They had ONE 2-gallon bucket-full left.
In that case, it's not worth their going to a washout yard. I told him to just wash out in a low spot at the entrance to the barn. If I'd told him "No", he'd have had to haul it back. That's the code here.
Local stuff varies. Some absolutely prohibit washing out on anywhere but at a disposal site or the mix plant. Some will let them wash out anywhere nobody cares.
Lloyd
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