what should i use to weld cast iron for color match

i saw a bridgeport table that was welded and reground and you could not tell. what do you use, that will match in color so it is not noticable after machine

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Asp3211968)

I think you try for best metal-to-metal weld. Some brand of Ni rod? If the weld works, then grind, scrape, stone to finish. It should come in pretty well as to surface color. Frank Morrison
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tell.
machine
I'm far from a weldor, but I recall many years ago seeing a rod made by Eutectic that was almost a perfect color match to gray iron. It was a torch applied rod as I recall. Nickel rod has a distinct yellow cast and shows up very well, so it is not a good choice if you prefer to not see repairs.
Harold
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Pretty hard to match. There's a "cast-iron" paint available that uses powdered iron as its pigment, and it works wonders. We used to use it over cast iron repairs. Not to pass off junk on a customer, just to make it cosmetically acceptable. The welded repair was stronger than the original, especially in areas of thin sections that broke easily and had to be built up with the weld. Never had anyone bring one back. The paint wouldn't work too well on surfaces under heavy use, of course.
Dan
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Asp3211968 wrote:

Cast iron rod, flux and torch application. Many years ago the lifter handle on my inlaws Franklin handle got broken. I welded it as above and filed the top surface smooth. The weld was a bit proud on the curved underside but I left that. After it "aged" a few weeks, you couldn't see the repair on the top surface. This was in the '70s and I still have a couple rods but I would imagine you could still find them somewhere. Otherwise, just use a piece of CI from something broken.
Ted
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Ted Edwards wrote: Cast iron rod, flux and torch application (clip) I still have a couple rods (clip) Otherwise, just use a piece of CI from something broken. ^^^^^^^^^^^^ And for flux? Can I use the same borax type flux I use for brazing? I have been trying to find this answer for months. My welding supply dealer sent me to a welding shop where "they know everything." Didn't get the answer. As far as I know, you and Ernie are the only ones with any of this rod. So, should I melt some CI into the V of a piece of angle iron to make my own rod?
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Leo Lichtman wrote:

Blacksmiths use borax flux for welding iron/steel so it would likely work. You might try on some scrap. I bought some specificaly for CI but the label is long gone.

Certainly worth a try.
Ted
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wrote:

"Aufhauser RCI is a high-quality gray iron oxyacetylene welding rod, designed for gas welding of cast iron, general fabrication or building up new or worn surfaces on castings. RCI is excellent for cast iron fabrication, repair of foundry defects, filling in or building up new or worn castings. RCI produces machinable weld deposits that have the same color, composition and granular structure as the base metal (gray iron). The weld, if properly made, can be as strong as the original casting."
Aufhauser Corporation 39 West Mall Plainview, NY 11803 Telephone: 516-694-8696 800-645-9486 Fax: 516-694-8690
Gary
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