Where can I buy Corrugated metal

The generator is finally connected to the home via a proper transfer
switch.
I need to build a little house for my generator. Dimensions are,
appx. 4x7 feet, 6 ft tall. I would prefer to build it from unistruts
and corrugated metal bolted to it, to make the generator easily
accessible.
My question is where can I find light gauge, galvanized currugated
metal.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus6708
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Try Lowe's and Home Depot. Not every store around here stocks it. They also have painted raised-seam siding that looks better. A few roofing companies have told me they can't sell it that cheap.
The zinc coating is very thin. I spray LPS3 on every year or so to keep rust spots from growing.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Home Depot in our area(southern Indiana) has carried it in the past (have not checked lately). 8' x 3' sheets if I recall correctly. Lyndell
Reply to
Lyndell Thompson
Pick up a nickle ad and find someone who builds pole barns....call and see if he has any remnants he will sell.
Reply to
PrecisionmachinisT
Borg, Blowes, larger lumber yards, farm supply yards, other home improvement stores. It's everywhere.
26" x 8' $12.98 each at the Borg.
-- Happiness comes of the capacity to feel deeply, to enjoy simply, to think freely, to risk life, to be needed. -- Storm Jameson
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Local farm and ranch store. Used on lots of out buildings. Thin means lighter to lift and cheaper - fits many a budget.
Martin
Reply to
Martin Eastburn
I would definitely use aluminum ,is it also available corrugated?
Reply to
Ignoramus6708
The Borgs have some, but the best place is a local manufacturer or supplier. Now, easier said than done. Many don't like to sell to the public, as they have distributors. But they do sell over runs and odd stuff. At times. Check your local yellow pages. I happen to be lucky enough to be 30 miles from a Fabral manufacturer, and have snagged some real deals from them, including, just bring a chain and drag this dog off stuff. I am currently locating appprox. 1400 sf of Mighty Rib Fabral sheeting. I have about half of it, and I'll find the other half for 20% of retail if I just wait. For you, I'd say the Borgs are your only best hope, unless you have a manufacturer in your area.
Check with manufacturers and distributors for "cover sheets". These are good sheets that are put on the outside of a bundle and banded on to protect the pristine inner pieces. Good stuff, just not pristine. And cheap, too.
HTH
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
Try Lowe's and Home Depot. Not every store around here stocks it. They also have painted raised-seam siding that looks better. A few roofing companies have told me they can't sell it that cheap.
The zinc coating is very thin. I spray LPS3 on every year or so to keep rust spots from growing.
jsw
Does it have to be galvanized? The Mighty Rib I get from Fabral has 11 layers of coatings, and I tell ya, I've let it lay out in the weather, sheet stacked on sheet, and no rust or galvanic reaction. The stuff at the borgs isn't quite that good, but hey, it's for a generator shed.
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
"Gunner Asch" wrote
Fergaddabout aluminum. Flimsy, and rips out easily, plus cost is higher. I used to get aluminum manufactured home awnings complete from a manufacturer in Las Vegas, but they had reinforcement at half or less the distance of steel components. Rain does not bother either aluminum or properly treated steel. I've seen carports that were 30 years old with no rust, both galvanized and painted. No aluminum ones, though. They are a one time deal. Very little chance of repairs, or sometimes, even matching profiles.
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
Yes, but you don't want it. It's too delicate for most things and it looks like hell when it gets dented, which it will.
If you want to protect your galvanized steel, clean it good with an alkaline cleaner, coat it with primer made for zinc ("gutter-grip" primer is the old term for it), and paint it with a good exterior paint. Since your project is so small, this shouldn't be a hardship.
It should last for years that way.
I'm surprised that someone didn't bring up ternplate. You don't want that, either.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Be prepared to add some mass - steel plate, stick-on lead sheet, etc. to de-tune the structure from resonating like crazy when the generator is running.
Reply to
Pete C.
Yes, it is, but you'll play hell trying to find some that's also galvanized. ;)
-- Happiness is not a station you arrive at, but a manner of traveling. -- Margaret Lee Runbeck
Reply to
Larry Jaques
"Steve B" fired this volley in news:mkdLp.223937$ snipped-for-privacy@news.usenetserver.com:
Mighty Rib IS galvanized, and aluminized, AND primed, AND painted.
The generic term is "Galvalume roofing", and it can be had in all variety of paints, non-painted, etc.
It lasts a long time. Around here, a 3' wide sheet runs you $2.00 per linear foot. (cut to length, delivery extra)
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Gunner Asch fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
Steel, properly surface treated (*read that as "Galvalume"*) AND properly cut lasts longer than anything else, including fiberglas shingles.
"Properly cut" means shorn, not sawn. Some manufacturers of galvalume-type roofing will void the warrantee if you saw it.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
I wonder why it matters. Sawing is so quick, it doesn't get/stay hot for long.
-- Happiness is not a station you arrive at, but a manner of traveling. -- Margaret Lee Runbeck
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Larry Jaques fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
I don't know that it really does, and have no way of proving it. I can tell you what my local (Tampa) vendor _says_, though:
He says that shearing helps "wipe the coatings across the cut edges", which he says improves the corrosion resistance of cut edges. He says that sawing leaves only bare, unprotected metal.
Whatever... I suspect it's malarky, but he includes in his 30 year warrantee that sawn sheets void the warrantee. So you shear, whether or not you want to.
FWIW, power shears are just as fast (maybe faster) than sawing; but they're damnably expensive!
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
An examination with a good magnifier should explain the difference in the edge between the two methods. Plus, there would be track marks from most saws away from the cut marks where corrosion could start. If it made a big enough difference that it voided a very good warranty, I'd just suck it up and do it right.
I cut mine with Wiss snips, and that's hard enough with the ribs. A real shear would be very expensive, IIRC, around $1500 last I heard. That is like a paper cutter on steroids. An electric snipping shear would probably be less.
Steve
Heart surgery pending?
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Reply to
Steve B
It's spuriously logical because dry, plated coatings don't smear well. Does your guy sell used cars, too?
Yeah, I suppose so. It's much cleaner, too. I've cut both fiberglass and metal sheeting and a saw is damnably loud and dirty. Masking tape applied to the base plate keeps marking and scratching down to a minimum, though I cut on the backside. Regular aviation snips work pretty well on both, but I try to remember to support both sides of the cut or I can get tearout on the fiberglass.
Fitty dolla?
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-- The more passions and desires one has, the more ways one has of being happy. -- Charlotte-Catherine
Reply to
Larry Jaques

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