OT..One to Test You

Gentlemen

A very long time ago, in the late forties, when our own Norman was a lad, grocery shops such as the Co-op used to have a central cashier's office, rather than individual tills located on the counter.

The customer would buy her half pound of lard and the shop assistant would load the money and a receipt into a small brass pot. The pot was then attached to a system of exposed overhead wires, an overhead handle was pulled downwards and the pot whizzed along the length of the shop to the cashier's office. A short time later the pot whizzed back, now containing any change and the 'paid' receipt.

Who made this system....what was it called...?

(nb Do not confuse with the later system where the process was the same except the transfer was by means of a cylindrical container traveling within enclosed tubing and propelled by compressed air..'Lampson Tube'? This system, until recently, at least, was still in use in some of HM's warships) --

Chris Edwards (in deepest Dorset) "....there *must* be an easier way!"

Reply to
Chris Edwards
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Tom

Reply to
Tom

At the Beamish Museum, Tyne & Wear they have a "Coop Shop" I believe with this system installed. Perhaps if you contact them, they mey be able to help, Tom.O

Reply to
thomas

Chris Edwards started this string with a request for information regarding those marvellous contraptions which used to grace Co-ops and other department stores, and which were such a fascination to small boys of the era.

But he mentioned .........

I suspect that these tubed systems worked by vacuum rather than compressed air. The trap into which the capsule was put used to snap shut with a satisfying thud - as I remember - rather than blow open.

Mike

Reply to
Mike

You may well find that the pneumatic system is still used in some places. A local supermarket, ASDAS I think, had such a system installed when the place was built ~ 20 years ago, though not in use today. I think it was mainly a way of getting cash away from the tills so that there weren't large amounts stored there. Probably with card payments and cashback there is less need for it now.

There was a small department store in Harpenden, Herts which had the overhead wire system still in active use at about the same time.

Tim

Reply to
Tim Leech
.

One answer to Chris Edwards' query is to be found at .....

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where we read the following???..

"Lamsons told me that the last new Rapid Wire system to be installed was at Schipol Airport in the Netherlands around 1953 for conveying air tickets. It used Kick-back cars. Aerocom's clients include Lufthansa, Airmotive, and Irish Express Cargo"

Mike

Reply to
Mike

Or even better at ......

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Reply to
Mike

Hi Tim, just have a look in Tesco, Warrington. Every till has a hydrolic tube fitted to send money to the office. (Almost new store). Also were you in Warrington 15 years ago when Rylands Wire ran many hydrolic tubes (visible best in Battersby Lane) on poles along side the road to the interchange post. It was then sent by hydrolic tube to various works round the town.

Reply to
Dave Croft

tube fitted to send money to the office.

Rylands Wire ran many hydrolic tubes

would that perhaps be pneumatic rather than hydraulic?

AWEM

Reply to
Andrew Mawson

Well Spotted Andrew. You are quite correct. I shouldn't post replies until my Saturday night beer has moderated a little. 8^)

Reply to
Dave Croft

Well Spotted Andrew. You are quite correct. I shouldn't post replies until my Saturday night beer has moderated a little. 8^)

Reply to
Dave Croft

A number of Sainsbury's stores (new build) in the last 5 years or so still use the pneumatic system for emptying the tills, those at older stores were overhead but I've not seen those for about 10 years now. The new ones disappear under the floor presumably to a central depository.

At a guess the containers are around 8 inches high and maybe 3 inches diameter. With the move to electronic transactions they get used less and less but I've seen them in use in the past few months and I only visit once a week or less.

Reply to
Mike

In message , Andrew Mawson writes

If by the word pneumatic you mean air (or the lack of it) rather than oil - then yes.

These systems work by vacuum. I believe that IKB ran a full size railway on a somewhat similar method in the West Country.

Don't get sucked in by all this.

Mike

Reply to
Mike

The Atmospheric Railway on the Exe, near Dawlish.

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Not one of his greatest successes.

-adrian

Reply to
Adrian Godwin

OK so we have now decided as a group we know about this system. But how many have had a play with one? Back in the fifties ( I think), I was challenged by the young lady behind the counter to send the pot on its way. First attempt was a dismal failure as she expected. I insisted on another go and this time it almost took the cashiers little cabin with it! Perhaps a little exaggeration there?

Henry

Reply to
Dragon

As a lad I used to work in a Sheffield steel melting shop that sent cast analysis samples to a lab by tube conveyor over about 800m and got the results back by teleprinter.

The Lamson company still makes tube systems:

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Bill H Derby

Reply to
Bill H

Our local ASDA, recently refurbished, does indeed still use the system to take cash away from the tills but it seems to be entirely a one-way system. I'm fairly sure that when the place was first built it carried traffic in both directions.

Tim

Reply to
Tim Leech

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