Removing a reluctant chuck from an ML7

Following the saga of the broken back gears on an ML7, I'll admit using them to remove chucks on mine. After engaging back gear I put the chuck key in place and give it a whack
with my hand. So far as I remember it's never needed anything more drastic. However supposing that is not enough, is there a way of getting a chuck off without risk to the back gears?
Henry
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Yes there is ... My south bend came with an expanding cranked handle that you fit into the spindle tube at the gear end...it's a manual turning attachment.
Now, if I was to put the handle resting on blocks of wood ....you get the idea ..
Will get you pics, if you so wish ...
Also, You can get expanding floor plugs ....the sort, that are meant for holding machines down ........they also make a rubber type ones ...ltttle less harsh....you could rig something up out of those..
All other methods...i think.... are not as direct acting....or could be more damaging.
all the best..markj
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You have a ML7 and the list of improvements and help in solving simple day to day problems like stuck chucks is only a minute fraction. There is at least two 'mandrel handles' published and legion about chucks. Really, a beginner must have a ready suppy of information.There is a kit for the handle dedicated ro the ML7 and Super 7's. I feel that you should get around to having the books in your possesion. I am not the only one who has attempted- and failed to get information on the internet.
Isn't it rather like having a car but being unwilling to pay for some fuel to go in it?
Norm
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Thanks to Mark and Norm for drawing my attention to the mandrel handle. I was aware of that device but have not found a need/use for it so far. It never occurred to me that it would hold well enough to remove a chuck. another thing to add to the list of things to do! Norm, I don't have 'all' the books but am not completely without. Sparey's Amatuer's Lathe and Ian Bradley's Amateur's Workshop are my usual references and I had them before the Internet was widely available. The question about broken back gears triggered this thread. I've benefitted from other's questions - I wonder how many have done so from mine?
Henry
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On Wed, 11 Jun 2008 00:22:38 +0100, "Dragon"

I have a shortish length of wooden batten, about 10-12" long, that I grip in the chuck jaws, then spin the chuck backwards by hand so the batten strikes the bed. A couple of impacts and it usually came loose.
I haven't had to do this for quite a while though, as since the first few times I now always make sure that both threads are clean and lightly oiled before a chuck goes on.
Peter
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On Wed, 11 Jun 2008 13:11:33 +0100, Peter Neill

and, if I remember rightly, that's the Myford recommended way, too. I think it's in the handbook somewhere.
--
Chris Edwards (in deepest Dorset) "....there *must* be an easier way!"

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Yes, a bit of 2 x 1 (say 10" long) is very handy. My 3-jaw usually gets stuck after a parting dig in 8-(
Peter
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wrote:

Interesting technique - must give it a try. My lathe came with a green book called :- ML7 LATHE notes on Operation Installation and Maintenance also Pictorial Parts List including Tri-leva Speed Selector Lathes
No mention of removing chucks though fitting is covered and includes Peter's technique of cleaning and oiling.
Henry
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Worth mentioning - I'm sure you meant this but the OP may not have understood - that to do this you turn the spindle backwards by pulling the drive belt upwards. If you do it by grabbing and turning the chuck it won't achieve anything.
I'm sure that turning with the drive belt would be less prone to slip than a mandrel handle - I have problems getting mine tight enough to cut a thread - and certainly it is a lot quicker.
David
--
David Littlewood

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wrote:

Had little time to play in the workshop this week so a mandrel handle out of the question so far. Did find the time to try the wooden batten idea. Both belts have guards which makes the motor to countershaft inaccessible and the countershaft to mandrel awkward. Tried by pulling the countershaft to mandrel belt upwards. With the belts tensioned I could only move it slowly. With the tension released there was no drive unless I pulled the belt outwards and upwards. Not enough room for me to get enough speed to make that work either. Must be missing something so looking for enlightenment!
Henry
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On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 21:16:13 +0100, "Dragon"

Enlightenment thusly:-
Myford's recommended practice involves the use of the electric motor in reverse. This dramatically reduces the likelyhood of trapping fingers between belt and pulley.
Mark Rand RTFM
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wrote:

Thank ye kindly young sur. Tis truly a wondrous idea.
What's more it works! Had spotted the potential for trapping fingers which no doubt inhibited my puny attempts by hand.
Henry
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On Sat, 14 Jun 2008 10:53:54 +0100, "Dragon"
Reminds me of the old camel joke...
Regards, Tony
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wrote:

Go on then, don't keep us in suspense!
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wrote:

...groan......no! Don't.....unless it's a new joke about an old camel...?
--
Chris Edwards (in deepest Dorset) "....there *must* be an easier way!"

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uk.rec.models.engineering wrote:

Seconded. The only brick joke worth telling is Gerard Hoffnung and the barrel of bricks. Much more painful.
Regards,
David P.
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wrote:

Nah, Thumbs not fingers.
--
Richard

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On Sat, 14 Jun 2008 17:49:52 +0100, Richard Edwards

Close enough though...
Regards, Tony
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replying to Mark Rand, Peter Blair wrote: I know this is an old message but I am in the group that at present has a ML7 dedicated to using a three Jaw chuck! I have tried an impact gun and the wooden stick but don't really understand using the motor in reverse. I mean I know how to reverse it but how exactly does one use it to remove a stuck chuck.
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On Mon, 09 Oct 2017 04:18:04 GMT, Peter Blair

Place a bit of wood on the rear shear of the lathe so that a chuck jaw will strike it if the chuck is turned backwards. now engage belts, backgear etc and turn the motor on in reverse. Chuck jaw strikes piece of wood and chuck stops turning. Lathe mandrel keeps turning in reverse. Chuck gets unscrewed.
Another method you can try is to engage backgear, tighten belts, clutch etc as appropriate. and, with the motor off, grip a chuck jaw with a large adjustable spanner. Then hit the spanner firmly with the heel of your palm or a wooden mallet.
Mark Rand
--
RTFM

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