soldering graphite?

Is it possible? A friend says yes, with S-bond alloys, but afaict you need to vacuum-deposit something on the graphite first.
Anything easier?
ta
--Peter Fairbrother
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Would conductive epoxy resin do the job? E.g. http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/conductive-adhesives/9185015/
--
Chris Holford

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Chris Holford" wrote in message writes

Copper plate it using a copper sulphate solution. You can then solder the copper. Best if the surface is a bit rough to give s mechanical key.
Andrew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13/07/17 22:14, Andrew Mawson wrote:

You can't deposit copper from a copper salt without replacing the surface of the 'host' body by copper from the salt. CuSO4 + C does not do anything at normal temperature, and I doubt very much if it does anything useful at higher ones.
The carbon might oxidise though...
--
Rusty Hinge
To err is human. To really foul things up requires a computer and the BOFH.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You use a copper electrode as the anode and the graphite is the cathode. Standard school physics demo when I was at school, and I don't think the electrochemistry has changed at all !!!!!
Andrew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 07/17/17 20:41, Andrew Mawson wrote:

Find an old style battery, remove carbon electrode and use to show it works.
Being a radio bod in youth, some resstors in those days used a carbon rod, with tinned copper wire wrapped round the ends, then soldered,for leadouts. Others used a press on cap...
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Chris" wrote in message

Been there Chris. They had the advantage that you could file a nick in the carbon resistor to adjust (increase) it's resistance - excellent for adjusting meter shunts :)
Andree
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 17/07/17 21:41, Andrew Mawson wrote:

There would be a mechanical interface between the supply and the carbon electrode, as in motor brushes, etc.
--
Rusty Hinge
To err is human. To really foul things up requires a computer and the BOFH.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
.myzen.co.uk> writes

OOPS! -Misread the spec's that one is thermally conductive; this one is electrically conductive (but not AFAIK an epoxy) http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/conductive-adhesives/1015621/
--
Chris Holford

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13/07/2017 21:20, Peter Fairbrother wrote:

If you vacuum deposit something onto it you aren't really soldering to the graphite. It is more akin to the small brass caps crimped onto the carbon rods in old style batteries. You could solder to the brass but you weren't soldering to the carbon.
--

Suspect someone is claiming a benefit under false pretences? Incapacity
Benefit or Personal Independence Payment when they don't need it? They
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.