toolpost

hi I'm looking for a different toolpost for my ml7. I want it to be
easy to centre tool and quick change the tool.Thankyou for your views
on this subject
Reply to
bert
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Nice one here, to build yourself:
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Peter
Reply to
Peter Neill
My tool posts are 1.5" lengths of 2"x1" mild steel with a slot milled in one side, and two tapped holes for screws to hold the tool in position. Each tool has it's own toolpost.
Height adjustment is done by shimming, but you only have to shim once per tool - the tool and toolpost stay together, even when resharpening.
Replacing a tool involves only unscrewing the knob which holds the toolholder in place, repacing the toll+holder with a new tool+holder, and screwing it back up.
You could make a hole in the bottom for the click-to-position feature, but I don't bother (mostly because it's no hassle, but also because I don't think it's accurate enough).
This is for a C3-type minilathe, not a Myford, and I work in tough materials mostly - but it gives very good rigidity, better than anything else I've seen.
(not-very-good) photo here:
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-- Peter Fairbrother
Reply to
Peter Fairbrother
Speaking of toolposts, does anyone actually load up four tools into a four way tool post?
Steve
Reply to
Steve
And very good it is too...
Regards, Tony
Reply to
Tony Jeffree
Ooooh!
Tried it once. Kept cutting myself.
Don't use my four-way much at all these days.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
That's why I asked, I tried it once too, but only once for the same reason - too much of a hedgehog impersonation.
Steve
Reply to
Steve
Same here. The thing is a damn nuisance and I really aught to get rid of it.
Cliff Coggin.
Reply to
Cliff Coggin
Hello Bert
The David Lammas three sided toolpost solves the safety problems that four sided toolposts have and allows a selection of tools to be easily available. It is easy to make from the castings and drawings that Blackgates supply.
I made mine so that the 3/8" tools I mostly use automatically line up on the centre line. I think there is enough meat in the castings to add in a method to provide height adjustment for other tool sizes, which is what I intend to do with the casting which is awaiting machining. Yet another project!
John
Reply to
jlh45
On or around Tue, 27 May 2008 08:31:03 +0100, "Cliff Coggin" enlightened us thusly:
I usually have an 80 degree indexed thing in one side (for normal turning and facing) and the parting blade holder in the opposite side. Fitting 4 tools to it requires tools of the right size; the parting blade holder for example is as long as the whole of one side of the toolpost, so precludes using the slot "behind" it.
It is handy being able to clonk it round 180 degrees and get another tool without fiddling. Of course, the best answer is a quick-change toolpost, but that's a bit of an expensive luxury if the existing one is serviceable.
Reply to
Austin Shackles
Greetings John, Do have any photos of your toolpost that you could post to metalworking.com? Or any links to either a drawing or photo of the David Lammas toolpost? I googled but was unable to actually find either a drawing or photo. Thanks, Eric
Reply to
etpm
With all the good designs to build or copy, of decent working quick change tool posts, I can hardly see the worth of keeping a four way (or three) post around.
For a short run of sorta production, if properly set up, they can afford a bit of convinience, but not nearly as much as the swappable holders on a QCTP. And that really only if the operator takes the time to build/use the ratcheting indexing feature, so that it will index to a fixed position, more or less.
And if you are going to go out and BUY one, or a casting.... Might as well cut straight to where you are going to want to be.
Find a picture of a "trigon" carbide tool insert, and you have the basic shape. Make one side of the apex a bit longer than the other (the side nearest the chuck), and you are pretty much at the shape of the three way tool post.
It offers all the issues of a 4 way, less some of the mumbled curses, and no other advantages, IMO. PITA to set up, as all tools must be shimmed to height. Useful enough if all you need it to do is swap quickly from one tool to another, with no concerns about repeatability to a reference point.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
Hi Eric Hopefully you will be able to see the two photos I've attached to this.
If you have a fax number contact me off post and I will send you a copy of the article which describes the reason for the toolpost and how it is made. Also if you have a problem with the photos let me know and I will e-mail them to you.
Re Trevor's comments, the majority of my lathe work doesn?t require the repeatable accuracy of an indexed toolpost so the lack of an indexing system isn't a problem.
As to QC toolposts, I have used them but don't find they are an advantage. I like the flexibility of having six (two toolposts) and soon to be nine tools set up for instant use. One point to note, by making a toolpost 'upside down' you have a toolpost for right hand and boring tools.
There is another major advantage - in comparison with other toolholders they are cheap!
John
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Reply to
jlh45
Thanks Trevor, I was curious about the triangular shape. I actually have an Aloris tool post on the manual lathe. It does work quite well. Cheers, Eric
Reply to
etpm
Greetings John, Thanks for trying to post pictures but this newsgroup is not a binary newsgroup, at least it isn't for me. So pictures attached won't work. However, metalworking.com is the web site that has been set up to accompany this newsgroup and binary files can be posted in the "dropbox" at the site. Cheers, Eric
Reply to
etpm
Eric: use the html link in the message to view the pictures
Bob
Reply to
Bob Minchin
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Thanks Bob! And Thanks again to John for the pictures! Cheers, Eric
Reply to
etpm

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