Battery operated, light weight Linux HW to be carried in a model airplane

I am searching for a Linux hardware (which will be used in a model airplane) with the following specs; * Small * Battery operated (single power input 5v, or 9v or 12v)
* Light weight * Supports min 4 RS232 ports * Parallel printer port (for digital I/O) (or 8-16 digital I/O) * Optional USB port * 10/100 Ethernet port * Capable booting either from a USB memory and/or a Compact Flash disk
Any recommendation?
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<Dussrviok> wrote in message> I am searching for a Linux hardware (which will be used in a model airplane)

What will it do?
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Dussrviok wrote:

While these don't match all your criteria, they come close: http://www.gms4vme.com/P50x_Spider.html http://gumstix.com /
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In comp.os.linux.hardware Dussrviok wrote:

Some laptop motherboards almost make this, though they are generally not very small. Smallest ones I've seen are about 10cm*1cm*25cm. Ebay. Be careful to ensure that it'll work outside the notebook.
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Dussrviok wrote:

You've heard about the Gumstix, but there is also http://www.compulab.co.il/armcore-gx.htm http://www.personal-media.co.jp/te/en/teacube.html and just about any supplier of PC104 cards. Oh, aqnd look at rabbits...
try http://www.linuxdevices.com/articles/AT8498487406.html
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airplane)
It depends on the size of the airplane you're talking about. If you have the space, a C3-based board with CPU, memory, and all will draw under 20 watts max, and there are power supplies for them which run off of a 12-volt battery system. It won't have 4 RS232 ports on board, but it's got PCI slots, which means you can add whatever you need. A CF->IDE adapter runs about $15, add a CF card, and you're booting from it.
Being x86, you can even install a relatively standard distro for ease-of-use and configuration - the size of the CF card being the only limitation.
steve
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On Sun, 06 Feb 2005 21:46:33 +1100, Dussrviok wrote:

I believe a VIA nano-itx would fill the bill. Don't know if it is in production yet, you could also check on the several VIA mini-itx boards available.
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ray wrote:

Unless the plane is huge, a Mini-itx board will be unpractical. The Nano-itx, at 4.7x4.7", may still be too big, but regardless, it won't be released until late March at the earliest (mid summer more likely).
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<Dussrviok> wrote:> I am searching for a Linux hardware (which will be used in a model

Look at http://www.soekris.com / Many models have compact flash onboard
Netbsd is worth a look as an OS as it has a small footprint & is used in embedded boards.
gtoomey
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<Dussrviok> wrote in message >I am searching for a Linux hardware (which will be used in a model

As I am not sure what "small" and "light weight" mean in relative terms, you could have a poke around this site and see if any of the development projects or products help. The people are helpfull and easy to talk to.
http://www.uclinux.org /
Mark Addinall.

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<Dussrviok> wrote in message >I am searching for a Linux hardware (which will be used in a model

PS. I was a bit interested myself, and,
http://www.linuxdevices.com/news/NS5735950630.html
According to Viosoft, the company's embedded Linux development suite has been "completely integrated" with Intrinsyc's tiny PXA255-based CerfCube hardware platform. Specs of the CerfCube hardware that comes as part of Viosoft's hardware/software development kit include: a.. Processor -- 400 MHz 32-bit PXA255, based on Intel's XScale technology
b.. Memory: a.. 16 or 32 MB FLASH
b.. 32 or 64 MB SDRAM
c.. 2 EEPROMS -- 1 write protected, 1 unlimited read/write c.. Input/output ports: a.. 10/100 Ethernet
b.. USB 1.1 port
c.. 3 serial ports
d.. Digital I/O -- up to 32 digital lines with programmable interrupts d.. CompactFlash Type I/II header -- for adding off-the-shelf memory and I/O expansion functions
e.. 2 expansion headers -- for interfacing to custom hardware
f.. Size -- 3 x 3 x 3 inches
g.. Power -- 5VDC regulated; requires 400 mA with no CompactFlash device; peak of 800-900 mA Your requirement for 4+ serial ports could be handled I'm sure, through the expansion headers.
Good luck.
Mark Addinall.

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Dussrviok wrote:

I don't know if they have anything that meets all of your criteria, but Denx carries some really tiny stuff. Check out their products at http://www.denx.de /
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Dussrviok wrote:

Another possible option could be a Logic Card Engine SDK. I have a bit of a bias since I work for Logic, but our Card Engines do run Linux (depending on which processor you use). You can find more info at:
http://www.logicpd.com/eps/devkits/sharp/sdk/sharp_sdk /
The only areas that you might have a problem using a Card Engine with are:
- 'small'. The Card Engine SDK measures about 7" x 4.5" with a CF card installed. It also has onboard flash that you can boot from, so if you can fit your OS and application into 16MB, you can skip a CF card. But if you're doing alot from of writing of files, you may want a replaceable part so that you dn't have a junk the Card Engine when the flash wears outs.
- 4 serial ports. The Card Engine only has 1 built on to the SDK. Most of the processors have support for more than one, so you could probably connect 1 or two more ports to expansion headers on the SDK board. What are you controlling/communicating with on the four serial ports? Can you do it another way?
Jeff
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