Want to become robot designer from scratch

I want to design robots from scratch. I am an electronics hobbyist and a software engineer. I have an experience of 3.5+ yrs of working on 8051 assembly language,C. I
know very well interfacing microcontroller to real world, using sensors,ADC,DAC,motors etc.
But my problem is that I can do programming but for circuit design I have to look for somebody else. I want to learn this last area to give me satisfaction of building something from scratch.
Could anybody suggest me some real good book on practical circuit design. I do not want too much of theory , for that I can go back to my college textbooks.
I hope I am able to convey my thoughts properly.
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Rohit kumar Chandel wrote:

Rohit:
I sounds to me like you need some examples of stuff that just works. You are welcome to examine the various circuits I have assembled for my robotic creations:
<http://gramlich.net/projects/rb2/index.html
In short, each module has a dedicated microcontroller on it to handle the hard real time requirements of the task at hand -- pulsing a servo, read an IR Distance sensor, running a motor H-bridge, pinging a sonar etc. The controllers talk to one another over a multi-drop serial bus running at 500kbps.
All of the circuits, gerber files (for making PCB's) and firmware is open source with no strings attached.
Enjoy,
-Wayne
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Rohit kumar Chandel skrev:

Hi Rohit,
I was in kind of the same situation as you when I started out with hobby robotics - being a software developer and all. I stumbled across two IMHO great books: "Robot building for beginners" and "Intermediate robot building" both by David Cook (his homepage is at www.robotroom.com and is also a great source for inspiration). These books did not have much "standard" theory - I think the wildest thing about theory was Ohm's law :-). Instead in each book David shows how to build a robot from scratch while explaining what the different components are and how they work. Also David shows how to use multimeters, breadboards and even how to machine your own robot parts.
After reading the books I'm now capable of creating strange little critters from the ground up and know how to drive motors, how to create line followers, IR non-contact bumpers, etc.
HTH, Jimmy
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And of course, there are the "classics" by Gordon McComb: Robot Builder's Bonanza (I prefer the 2nd edition) Robot Builder's Sourcebook
I also like "Building Robot Drive Trains" by Dennis Clark

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On Wed, 20 Feb 2008 17:28:18 +0530, "Rohit kumar Chandel"

For a really fast runthrough of the basics (from what a resistor, capacitor, inductor are, basic E/I/R/power calculations, through transistors, opamps, logic gates) get most any edition of the ARRL Handbook. The first 100 or so pages is a highly condensed basic electronics course meant for practical use.
The next step up (though there may be step or two in between) is "The Art of Electronics" by Winfred Hill and Paul Horowitz: http://books.google.com/books?id=bkOMDgwFA28C&dq=%22the+art+of+electronics

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