Want to build workbench for a benchtop mill

Hi folks,
I am a hobbyist and I am in the process of building my home shop. My first project will be to build a workbench for my benchtop mill. I want
the workbench to be heavy, solid to reduce vibrations. I am planning to use 60x60x2 mm angle iron for the frame and 1000x300x10 mm thick mild steel plates for the top. There will be 3 plates on the top and they will be welded together
My question is, can I accomplish this with a Oxy acetylene welding rig? I'd rather not buy a stick welder if possible.
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Timur Aydin

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Timur Aydin wrote:

When I built my stand , I used scrap ... 4"x4" square , and some steel roofing framing for crossmembers . What I did different is used a particle board postform top doubled with plywood . May I suggest using your angle (2 1/2 x 2 1/2 x 1/8 to us 'murkins) to fab a frame and legs (suitably angle/crossbraced) and using a double layer of plywood as a top ? Wood absorbs vibrations much better than steel ... and if you really want to , you can bolt it together . Unless you got a big O/A rig , flame welding is going to be quite a task - one that I would personally hesitate to undertake . You might want to check out this email list http://groups.yahoo.com/group/mill_drill /
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Thanks for the suggestion. Didn't know that wood can absorb vibrations better than steel. But when thinking about it, makes sense. The harder a material, the more it will have a tendency to vibrate. If I use a wooden top, I will have problems with the cutting fluid splattering all over it, though ...

Specifically, is welding the frame/legs etc the problem or welding the thick surface steel plates? Would a 250 amp stick welder handle this?

Thanks for the link!
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Timur Aydin

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Wood is a better vibration damper than steel, just use a sealant on the top (varnish, or lacquer).
A 250 amp stick welder would handle just about anything, provided you use a good joint design (and possibly pre-heat too, if it's really thick).
I've not OA welded myself, but I've seen it done, and I don't think you would have a problem going that route if you already know how.
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Tin Lizzie
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"TinLizziedl" wrote: ( clip) I've not OA welded myself, but I've seen it done, and I don't think you

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ If he already knew how, he would know that this is not the route to go.
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He could O/A weld the stand from 1/8" angle iron, and bolt the top plates on top.
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Leo Lichtman wrote:

I am completely new to welding. But I have done extensive online research and it seems OA is the most versatile and low cost solution. I am not going to do any production work, so if a job will take a long time, that's ok :)
My dream is to own a powerful TIG welder some day (drooling over the dynasty 350), but in my country the brand name welders are ridiculously expensive. For example, the dynasty 200DX costs 9000 dollars, dynasty 350 is something like 13000 dollards. Buying on ebay isn't an option either because of customs. As I said, it's just a dream for now :(
So you guys in the US should consider yourselves luck to be able to buy a dynasty 200DX for just 2500 dollars. Or heck, you can grab a nice used machine on ebay for much less than that...
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Turkey???
Have you considered MIG? I don't have O/A because I don't want acetylene in the house.
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Yes, I'm in Turkey.

I am also scared of the acetylene. It doesn't seem to be the kind of work where you learn from your mistakes :o I will look at what MIG machines are available here.
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Timur Aydin

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Can you buy a not too expensive stick machine? It should do very well when it comes to steel workbenches.
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I am completely new to welding. But I have done extensive online

OA "welding" is a workable alternative, and in many cases allows the cheapest easiest solutions. Yet, it has limits on penetration, strength, and HAZ. It does allow for the joining (notice I did not say welding) of thinner materials using various filler materials.
Steve
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Timur Aydin wrote:
(snip)

In your neck of the woods you should be able to find Kemppi (Finnish), Panasonic (Japan), or Fornier (French) welders. None of these manufacturers have to take any crap from anybody. Since you have seaports and all these have top Lloyds ratings somebody is going to have them with reduced or no import duty on them.
Matt
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Timur Aydin wrote:

I don't know where you are located, but pretty much everywhere in the US at least (Depot, Lowe's, Sam's, Costco, etc.) you can buy a ready made workbench with steel legs / frame and 1.5" thick hardwood top for ~$200. This seems it would be faster and cheaper than building your own.
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I need a workbench, too. But I am going to make it out of 4 x 4's and 2 x 6's, with some paintlock topping. I just can't find a hefty enough one at the Borgs to hold a good sized vise, or hold up to some solid pounding.
YMMV
Steve
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Steve, since you have some time, you may want to look at liquidation auctions for a good maple top workbench. They are abundant and go for cheap. I bought a almost like new workbench with maple top, two drawer cabinets on sides, and on casters, for just $75 (IIRC), and it had a granite surface place to go with it also.
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Yes, I am also trying to make a workbench that is very heavy and rigid. The ones I saw in Home Depot are flimsy. Maybe I also should build the bench with thick wood and then weld a cutting fluid pan out of 1 mm sheet metal onto the top. Hmm...
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Timur Aydin wrote:

Your Depot probably didn't have the good ones then. Sam's and Costco both have ~$200 benches that are plenty solid.
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| > | > I don't know where you are located, but pretty much everywhere in the US | > at least (Depot, Lowe's, Sam's, Costco, etc.) you can buy a ready made | > workbench with steel legs / frame and 1.5" thick hardwood top for ~$200. | > This seems it would be faster and cheaper than building your own. | | I need a workbench, too. But I am going to make it out of 4 x 4's and 2 x | 6's, with some paintlock topping. I just can't find a hefty enough one at | the Borgs to hold a good sized vise, or hold up to some solid pounding. |
You loose too much storage space framing a bench top with 2 x 6s. Two inch square steel tubing is well worth the cost.
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Have you considered simply bolting the legs together? With the size of angle you are talking about, you have more than enough room for 2 or 3 good sized bolts at every joint. If bolts are too bulky for you, you could also use rivets--the real pound over type, not the pop type. If you can't find good sized rivets, you can make them by cutting large common nails (16d is a good size here, I don't know how they're sold where you are). Cut them a couple of diameters longer than the thickness of the joint. Place joint with the head of the rivet against something solid (large rock, chunk of iron, vise, anvil...) and pound straight at it with a hammer. It will squish out and mushroom over, just keep pounding until the joint is tight.
You can also really increase the rigidity by adding in some gussets or short diagonals at the corners. If you have room for it (aren't going to use the space for drawers, etc.) a full diagonal would be even better. Sheet metal or plywood sides and back screwed, bolted, or riveted on in a number of spots would also really help stiffen up your structure.
Yet another alternative to gas welding would be brazing.
There are a bunch of ways to do this that don't require a lot of money up front to get started. --Glenn Lyford
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