29-360 H-268 help please

On some AT grains, there is a thin layer of slick paper that must be peeled off the outside to get a smooth fit. It comes off without removing the white surface layer of the casting tube.
As for the liner tube, that usually fits as-is. Occasionally you might get one that doesn't fit right but that's a fairly uncommon occurrence.
Reply to
raydunakin
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I use a Husquavarna 545, and like it quite a bit. Light, tough, adequate power with an 18" bar. Excellent chain adjusment system. Can also be considered a rocketry tool for certain recovery situations....
Kevin OClassen
Reply to
Kevin OClassen
Doesn't matter. If that tube didn't come in the motor package then some will decide what you did constitutes flying an uncertified motor, then take it upon themselves to start calling insurers, landowners and the authorities.
And no, I am not kidding.
Reply to
Tweak
Do a search over on
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the same company (or saws) anymore. They sell 'em at mart-mart, fer pete's sake.
Speaking of whacked in the head (boy, where I could go with that), what safety gear do you wear?
Read the other day that 40k people are hurt or killed by chainsaws annually. Stats like that make my other hobbies seem pedestrian.
Hmmm. See a few on ebay, but you never know how much life any of those have left.
Indeed.
Maybe we should start a thread about my latest passion: Trailers and toyhaulers.
Reply to
Tweak
Yeah, that's what I thought. The new ones are all plastic and stuff...
Um... uh... well... ear plugs?
With the big Homelite, ear plugs are a must. I wear goggles too. But other than my good pair of steel toed boots, really nothing else.
Honestly, I'm very paranoid when I cut. Before I start in on a cut, I think about what's going to happen three, or four times. You can fairly easily predict when kickback will occur, and you can actually feel a change in the saw's action before it occurs. You have to be aware of where, or what the tip of the bar is going to contact as you make your cut. Also, be acutely aware of everything, and everyone around when the chain is moving. Try to stay away from situations which will cause the bar to bind, or to try and kick out of the cut.
Also, I'm definitely not afraid to admit inadequacy. For instance, I've got about a 24" diameter cherry, probably 45 feet long, that's functionally broken at the base and is leaning into another Maple tree. This spring, I'm going to have to get it down, else it'll be worthless for firewood once the bugs have had their way. But, after looking at the situation from many angles (and also noting that the neighbor's house is about 30 feet from it), I'm going to call the tree service back in. It's just way beyond my capability at this point. Now, once it's on the ground, watch out!
Yeah, or how many times they've been run minus oil. I wanted the XL because, at the time, it was the most "manual" saw I could find. I don't want all the automatic crap (chain tension, oiler, etc.), as I find that that's just more stuff to break. The XL has an automatic oiler, but it also has a manual pump. Chain tension utilizes the good old fashioned "loosen the bar, turn the adjusting screw" method.
I should probably invest in a trailer, but a friend lets me use his GMC single axle dump truck. When hauling a large amount of split firewood, a dump truck is the only way to go...
tah
Reply to
hiltyt
Tweak says: Doesn't matter. If that tube didn't come in the motor package then some will decide what you did constitutes flying an uncertified motor, then take it upon themselves to start calling insurers, landowners and the authorities
most of what flies is uncerted motors and we have our own ins. and the land owner cooks for us, but thanx again, Le.
Reply to
BigRockets
Gesundheit!
Really feel sorry for the guy with a tic...tic...tic...
because they have ways to make him tock.
John ( bored...bored...bored) Stein
Reply to
John Stein
Friend of mine got his Poulan out of a dumpster. He's a fabricator by trade, so he made a few parts and has been using it for about a year now. More trouble than it's worth, IMHO.
According to the folks on the arborist site, "leaners" are the most dangerous things to fool with. Period. I have 6 or 7, and some are big'uns (+2 ft thick hardwoods that soar into the sky). Wouldn't touch them before, and after research you couldn't pay me to.
A mans got to know his limitations.
But trailers are good for toting rockets, bikes, etc..
Reply to
Tweak
Obviously, the ATF needs to start regulating chainsaws. I'm sure they can find some way to justify adding chainsaws to the list of regulated explosives.
Reply to
raydunakin
Really. I simply cannot believe that our Federal Government would allow the sale, and distribution of such dangerous devices!
In the past though, there have been several trunk sections I've worked on in which I think a big chunk of C-4 would've been much more effective at cutting and splitting than a chainsaw...
tah
Reply to
hiltyt
Evidently chainsaws are the most dangerous item you can purchase without any sort of permit/lic./etc.. I imagine that will change once big brother sniffs an opportunity to protect more people from themselves.
Reply to
Tweak
C4. Just what we need for those "leaners".
Wait a minute, can we buy dynamite with the LEUP now? Or maybe I should strap a couple of EX M or N "test motors" to the leaners...those EX motors can overpressurize, you know. Probably wouldn't do crap to one of those oaks, but let's keep reality out of this discussion.
Reply to
Tweak
Keep the facts straight, Bubba and biily-joe-bob don't need a LEUP if their stump blowing activities are "not for profit" and for their own personal use.
Reply to
Dave Grayvis
changed hands!?!?! ;)
The only problem I've had with the chain saw is woodcutter loss of balance, or poor fitness, or bad footing. Once, I fell twice with the saw while cutting wood. I just toss the saw clear when that happens. It is embarrassing.
I think the log spitter is more dangerous. I've had my fingers pinched trying to move huge blocks of wood into the spitter. I guess that's actually my cousin's fault for trying to lift up his end of the block when I'm not quite ready. Then too, sometimes when the wood splitter works it really pops and sends a piece of wood flying. You learn how to avoid that real fast.
Levis, long sleeved shirt (no matter how hot it is), gloves, glasses, earplugs, and a ball cap. The ball cap offers little or no protection, but then there are no nicks in it either.
I've seen Chain saw Massacre, and a few others, but not Saw I or II.
Some people probably just buy a chain saw for a one time job. The first chain saw I bought was a very small McCulagh. I only used it to cut some railroad ties for a small landscaping task. I thought it might also be handy for rocket recovery, but I never used it as such. Eventually I just gave it away. I've only been into wood cutting for firewood for about 6 years. My cousin always uses two saws. There is not that much difference between them. I think what he really wants to do is wear out the old saw, while extending the life of the new saw. His newer saw is a Stihl. I cut with only one saw, but I usually bring an axe, sledge hammer, and four steel wedges. I use a Stihl MS 310 and I am happy with it. Actually, I wish it was easier to change the chain.
I also have an Electric Stihl ET4 chains saw, which is older than the MS 310. It works quite well around the house, as long as the chain is sharp. One of my sisters even uses it at her house. I prefer the faster cutting gas saw even around the house. The one place I like using the electric chain saw is trimming dead wood from a live tree, where the lighter weight is an advantage. I have an uncle who liked our electric chain saw so much, he bought his own. He claimed he had too much trouble starting a gas saw.
My sister also bought a Stihl garden tiller this spring. It is fair to say that we have high regard for Stihl. However, there are several good saw manufacturers. I think the key thing is that we have a good local sales and service dealer for Stihl products.
I also have a brother-in-law, in Michigan, who cuts trees for a power company. He even goes FL and wherever to clear trees after hurricanes. I don't know what brand he uses. He does not talk much about his work, aside from the story of when he fell when a poll he was climbing split on him. He as declined offers to cut wood with us on every visit.
Oh my aching back!
Nah... I had friend who raced CanAm cars before it got too expensive, and later got back into racing endurance carts. He said he used to haul a $20,000 car on a $500 trailer, and now he hauls a $500 cart on a $20,000 trailer.
Alan
Reply to
Alan Jones
I just got a call from that sister. She wants to buy a snow blower right away. I told her the name of that place is "Air Cooled Motors". I'm not even sure Stihl makes a snow blower. Any recommendations? She has a small place, ideal for a shovel, IMHO.
Alan
Reply to
Alan Jones

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