Overfinishing a rocket

Wow, I'm finishing a large project and now I'm spraying white primer. The more I sand and fill and paint, and repeat again and again, as I
see more small flaws like glue drops of lumpy paint. Anyway I'm at the point of diminishing returns. The more I finish and prime, the worse It starting to look. Any suggestions?
The Rocketeer
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Simple.. There's an old adage...
"Pretty rockets crash"
If you plan on flying this bird, don't try to get it perfect, as it won't be after the first flight.
By "large project", what do you mean? Is it a clustered "D" or a clustered "O"?
snipped-for-privacy@junglevision.com wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@junglevision.com wrote:

Put down the cans of paint and go do something else for the rest of the day.
Come back after the paint has had a chance to evaporate it's solvents. Lightly sand with fine paper or steel wool...
Hit the low spots/voids with a contrasting color of putty (i.e Testors red or that green stuff)
Wait awhile.... Hit the high spots with fine sand paper.
Prime again one last time with all the primer you've got left in the can, and paint.
FWIW, for most models, I call it quits when the spray cans are empty. Makes ya pre think things before spraying.
At least on this end...
Best, Andy
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This would look interesting on a standard Estes Mosquito! :-)
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On 8 Sep 2006 21:06:09 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@junglevision.com wrote:

Take a break.
--
Darren J Longhorn http://www.geocities.com/darrenlonghorn /
NSRG #005 http://www.northstarrocketry.org.uk /
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Sure. Stop.
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snipped-for-privacy@junglevision.com wrote in

What are you spraying the primer with? Just using a spray can? The nozzle is probably the problem. Cleaning it may help,for a short time. If you're using a spray gun and compressor,then perhaps you need to strain the paint or thin it more.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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One advise, if you are having trouble sanding the primer, let it dry for a while.... Better to use a lacquer or shallac based primer because they become sandable in a day.
--
TAI FU
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tai fu wrote:

That's why I like Kilz primer. Dries quick, sands great, fills fantastic.
--
Visit Rocketry Planet - http://www.rocketryplanet.com

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I thought kiltz isnt meant to be sand, they always stay gummy. I have used BINS primer and they are nice. Use BINS then topcoat with whatever you wish...
--
TAI FU
"Darrell D. Mobley" < snipped-for-privacy@rocketryplanet.com> wrote in message
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Kliz Original oil-based primer can be sanded within a few hours (depending on how thick you put it on, humitity, etc)
I like to use it on large projects (larger than 4 inch diameter, taller than 5 feet) and I spray it with a HVLP gun off my compressor. Anything smaller than that, I use DupliColor primer cans (the thick/sandable stuff) Its dry within 30 minutes as it is lacquer based.
-Aaron tai fu wrote:

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tai fu wrote:

No, KILZ dries nice and hard, but makes voluminous amounts of dust. But it does fill real nice and will work under automotive paint. The 1 gallon size is water-based, so cleanup is a snap.
--
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And don't forget, The more you prime and paint, the heavier it gets.
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snipped-for-privacy@junglevision.com writes:

The more time you spend finishing it, the more likely it is to barrel into the ground and destroy itself on the first flight. Get out there and fly the damn thing!!
Chris
--
Chris Eilbeck
MARS Flight Crew http://www.mars.org.uk /
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. The more I finish and prime, the worse It

Hammerite is your answer. I'm not techy enough to be able to work out where in the world you live, but in the UK we have a "hammer" finished one coat paint called "Hammerite". It covers a multitude of sins. I used it on both my level 1 and 2 rockets. Regards Mel S UKRA L2 RSO
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