Masking & Painting

I build pretty well but my finishing is lacking some. I have decided to
start painting, any of you guys have any tips or good web sights to help
out. I know nothing about masking and painting good graphics, any help would
be appreciated.
Thanks,
Brad
Reply to
Brad
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Cut your graphics masks out of frisket paper (light adhesive backed paper). Use low-tack masking tape (usually blue). Lay down light colors first then darker ones over that.
-- Paul McIntosh
Reply to
Paul McIntosh
Very small brush, carefully thinned paint, and a very steady hand.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
On 10/11/2004 7:28 PM Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not so great) words of knowledge:
I use latex paint for painting my planes. After the latex has cured (7 - 10 days average ) I then clear coat them with 2 coats of a water base polyurethane for fuel proofing. The nice things about latex are: NO FUMES, soap and water clean up and if you don't like it (or mess up ) it can be removed with a wet cloth (usually UP TO 12 hours ).
For masking I use the blue 3M masking tape. When you get the tape look on the side of the plastic wrapper for the adhesive level - it goes from 1 - 5 dots. My experience has shown that 2 dot adhesive provide the best results. The 2 dot adheres well, but doesn't lift the paint underneath when removing. The 2 dot LOOKS like a paper tape, while the 3 dot and higher has a textured appearance.
For graphics you can use frisket paper (most artist supply stores ) or have them cut from vinyl. Another option would be to pick up some decal paper in both clear and white background and print them on your inkjet printer. I normally print my graphics (the detailed ones anyway) on decal paper and then clear coat them for fuel protection.
Reply to
Ted Campanelli
I didn't know about the frisket paper, I will look into this soon. Thanks, Brad
Reply to
Brad
Using latex has my interest, and that is good info about the dots for adhesive, I did not know about the dots. How do you apply your latex paint, and have you ever used a airbrush. I currently do not have a airbrush but thinking of picking one up soon (Santa, I been good this year). I am currently trying different glassing techniques, and painting with lustercote and store bought sprays. My Bingo kit has turned into an experimental process in prep for a much beloved Top Flite P-39. I glassed the fin and fuse and covered the open sections like the stab. I plan to paint over the glass and the covering. I have tried 3 different glassing techniques so far with the most success being an Epoxy mixed with denatured alcohol and micro balloons. However I think it was you that offered the Polyurethane technique and it did pretty well and saved a ton of money. You could glass an entire plane this way pretty cheap. It lacks the ability to fill the cloth as well but results were satisfactory. Anyway, I am rambling on but thanks for the information from all three guys here. Brad
Reply to
Brad
On 10/12/2004 9:58 AM Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not so great) words of knowledge:
How do you apply your latex paint,
I use an HVLP electric paint sprayer I bought on EBay for about $90 for large areas - the base color on the fuselage and wings. Then I use an airbrush for the detail/small areas. I have a "Husky" brand air compressor I use for the airbrush. I found that the small compressor cost about the same as the "dedicated" airbrush compressor, but had more uses. In either case you should start your spraying at 25 psi and go up to 30 psi if it isn't spraying properly. If it still isn't spraying right, go back to 25 psi and thin the paint some more. You do not need (and really shouldn't use ) over 30 psi for spraying latex.
Practice spraying on some glass first to get the feel of it and adjustments of the spray units.
I am
The epoxy method works well, however, I find it heavier overall and the sanding more difficult than with the polyurethane method.
However I think it was you that offered the Polyurethane technique
When using the polyurethane method to apply the fiberglass, after the fiberglass cloth is stuck down (the initial coat ), you need to apply 1 or 2 coats of polyurethane mixed with micro balloons to fill the weave of the fiberglass. The way I do it is:
1. 1 coat of sealer to seal the wood. Wet sand with 400 when dry.
2. Lay the fiberglass cloth on the area to be glassed and apply 1 coat of UNTHINNED polyurethane, working from the center toward the edges, to adhere the fiberglass. Use a FOAM brush. DO NOT SAND at this time.
3. When that is dry, I apply 1 or 2 coats of polyurethane mixed with micro balloons to fill the weave. Again, I use a foam brush. When dry, wet sand with 400.
4. Apply 1 coat of thinned polyurethane.
5. apply 1 THIN coat of a dark color sandable primer and block sand to show up any low/high spots.
6. Use light weight filler on the low spots.
7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 until satisfied, then apply 1 LIGHT coat of primer. I use a white primer for this as light colors will cover the white easily with a minimum of coats.
Steps 4 - 7 I spray the poly and primer coats.
I get a finish that is as smooth as glass doing it like this.
Anyway, I am rambling on but thanks for the
Reply to
Ted Campanelli
OK - curiousity got the best of me - what is/are micro balloons??
Cheers'n Beers.. [_]) Don
Reply to
Don Parker
Micro balloons is a filler. Looks like a powder. I bought some from SIG back in the 70s ans still have it. I mixed it with polyester resin or Ambroid. Good stuff. mk
Reply to
Storm's Hamburgers
Tiny little glass beads that can be mixed with glue (or dope) to make a filler:
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Microballoons are a lightweight free-flowing white powder consisting of microscopic, hollow, glass ball clusters. Microballoons are a specially processed silica glass, classified to insure uniform particle size and product performance and is hydrophopic (does not readily adsorb moisture). It disperses extremely well when mixed with various resins or plaster. Microballoons do not absorb resin and therefore provide maximum filler function. Cured systems are more water resistant and have a higher temperature resistance in addition to being more thermal and electrical resistive.
In addition, microballoons reduce the weight of the finished the product and offers improved workability (nailing, sawing, drilling, etc.) further reducing costs. It has been used extensively in molded vanities, doors, columns, lighting fixtures, picture frames, etc. It is more more easily sanded than fiberglass flock, so it can be used in polyester systems where extremely high-strength is not required. It can be used in sandable pastes to repair imperfections in wood and fiberglass boats, cars or other parts. Many engineering students at the university level have used microballoons to increase buoyancy and as a lightweight and inexpensive filler in cement canoe projects.
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Marty
Reply to
Martin X. Moleski, SJ
Thanks for the replies -
One of the neat things about getting into new hobbies, is the multitude of new "discoveries"!!
Reply to
Don Parker
I've been cutting paint masks for several people in my club out of vinyl. Of course you have to have access to a cutter and software.
Reply to
StarCad
I actually found a place about 3 miles up the road from me that will cut out just about any graphic you can think of. And they have very reasonable prices as well. Brad
Reply to
Brad
Do you use the 'low tack' ultra thin vinyl? What kind of cutter do you use?
Reply to
jeboba
I've been using Orocal about 3 mil and love the stuff. I have a CT2
PCut plotter so I can cut both large and small. I wanted a 36" bu another thousand buck I thought otherwise. Been doing some graphics t add to my foamies and shoud have some pic's in a day or so
-- starca
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starcad

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