ARM: Review - DML 1/35 Scale M4A2 Tarawa

Kit Review: Dragon Models Limited 1/35 Scale '39-'45 Kit Number
6062; M4A2 Tarawa; 395 parts (329 parts in grey styrene, 43 etched
brass, 20 clear styrene, 2 DS plastic track runs, 1 length of twisted
steel wire); estimated retail price US $38-41
Advantages: first integrated and accurate mid-production Sherman kit on
the market; very nicely done "low bustle" turret; track problems
appear solved
Disadvantages: will not assemble itself (okay, no model kit will!)
Rating: Highly Recommended
Recommendation: For all "Shermaholics" and USMC fans
For many years the earlier models (early being defined as "Direct
Vision" 56 degree hulls and mid-production as non-"direct vision"
56 degree hulls) of the M4 series of US medium tanks have been ill
served as model kits. There was an ancient Airfix M4 kit of a
mid-production M4 but it was not really very good. Most of the early
kits were limited to M4A1 cast hull types, and not the M4, M4A2 or M4A3
types.
Some years ago Tamiya offered an "Early Production" M4 but it was
basically little more than a new hull top for its older M4A3 47 degree
late production hull with a slightly modified turret. The lower hull
was still that of the M4A3 with late production bogies and also no
sponson floors.
The M4A2 has been very poorly served, as all kits offered thus far
have been the 47 degree (late model or "wet stowage") hulls but
with numerous errors in the Academy kits and an original Italeri one
which was actually an M4A3. So far the best M4A2, albeit the late
production 76mm one with the 47 degree hull, was the one from DML as
its Soviet offering.
DML has finally - after many years of advertising the M4A2
mid-production tank in its catalogue - delivered, and the model is
one of their best. Building on their recent M4A1 and M4A3 kits, this
one uses the "A" or detail sprue from those kits (labeled as
"M4A2/A3"), the "C" or clear parts sprue, and the two "V"
sprues from the M4A1 76mm kit with a new hull, turret and other
details.
What the modeler gets is a mid-production 56 degree hull M4A2 with
welded drivers' hoods and the "low bustle" turret (no loader's
hatch) with the M34A1 gun mount with wide cast mantelet. The wheels are
the pressed steel welded type with backing plates provided for the road
wheels and idlers, and a choice of either "cast" or "disk"
driver rings of which the "cast" rings are more accurate for this
version. The VVSS bogies are those with the "flat" return roller
mounts and also pillow blocks to raise the idlers. A "soft" or
early cast transmission cover is provided separately for the hull.
(Yes, like all DML kits it HAS sponson floors in it.)
The turret is very neatly done and makes extensive use of slide
molding to capture the shape of the turret, especially around the
pistol port on the left side. The M3 gun barrel is also molded with a
hollow bore. Likewise, the coaxial machine gun and even the turret
spotlight are also slide molded for accuracy. All details except the
ventilator are separate items on this turret, so it would be hard to
ask for more in styrene plastic.
The hull is correct all the way around, with a correct lower hull with
twin access plates to the two GMC diesel engines. The upper hull is
beautifully done with scale weld bead that stands proud of the hull -
no more "trenches!" The A2 engine deck comes with separate hatches
but no interior (and I was wondering what to do with that Tank Workshop
GMC power pack for a mid-production A2 that I have had sitting around
for years...) Filler caps may be shown in either open or closed
positions, as can all of the periscopes and crew hatches.
The kit does not come with a commander's machine gun, but most of
the Marine tanks do not seem to have used them early in the war in the
Pacific, so this is not a flaw per se.
From information I have on this kit, DML ran into problems with the
tracks as there was no good way to make a set of "Magic Track" -
DML's current preferred method - that would capture the three-piece
design of the medium tank tracks. The solution - which should be
acceptable to most modelers as well as win DML friends with many
frustrated souls - was to make them in DS plastic, DML's gluable
vinyl type tracks. The type selected with this kit is the T54E1 style
with solid steel chevrons and openings inside the ends, and thanks to
the flexible DS plastic it has also captured the end connector details
as well. Two links are used for connection at the ends, so one link
could be trimmed out to get a tighter fit if needed.
The etched brass supplied covers mostly small details such as the sand
shield attachment points along the sides of the hull, headlight guards,
and fender components as well as the commander's "blade" sight.
No tie-downs or tool straps are supplied. Note that to attach the tools
holes must be opened up in the hull from the inside, and there is a
small guide given in Step 7 in the directions as to which holes are
used. Also three factory casting identifiers are included for use on
the rear of the turret, but they are not keyed to any specific tank nor
any variations in the turret design.
Markings are included for six tanks from C Company 1st Tanks
(COLORADO, COBRA, CUDDLES, CHARLIE, CANNONBALL and CONDOR) and one from
D Company (DESTROYER) of which the latter also carries aircraft-type
"stars and bars" insignia. Design credit is given to Mike Canaday
and Pawel Krupowicz.
Overall, this is a great effort and captures its subject very nicely.
DML should be congratulated for getting more of the A2 right than
anybody else.
Thanks to Freddie Leung for the review sample.
Cookie Sewell
Reply to
AMPSOne
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: : Some years ago Tamiya offered an "Early Production" M4 but it was : basically little more than a new hull top for its older M4A3 47 degree : late production hull with a slightly modified turret. The lower hull : was still that of the M4A3 with late production bogies and also no : sponson floors. : I have been so annoyed with Tamiya that I have refused to purchase either of their Sherman "re-dos" simply because they could not be bothered to fix the sponson issue.
For $45.00, they should have fixed this. Not to mention bothered to fix the suspension...
I do have to admit that I wished they would screw up by the numbers and do the Horstman suspension on the M4A4 on the "mile of tanks", assuming it is still there, of course...
Bruce
Reply to
Bruce Burden
I do have to admit that I wished they would screw up by the numbers and do the Horstman suspension on the M4A4 on the "mile of tanks", assuming it is still there, of course...
Bruce
Alas,after some woman got on post drunk and crashed into one of the tanks (and then sued the Army -- successfully, go figure!) the "Mile of Tanks" is now only a few vehicles on the golf course to the right of the highway as you come on post. The tanks are still here but undergoing rehab and repainting.
Cookie Sewell
Reply to
AMPSOne
No reflectors on the tanks, most likely. A guy who could hardly stand - he was so drunk, drove into a telephone pole. He sued the utility company and won. The pole was too close (a couple of inches) to the street's concrete curb at the edge of the sidewalk.
Reply to
Willshak
Bill,
Tanks were about 15 feet off roadway in middle of the median strip. But since woman had to go past two guards to get in they should have stopped her for DWI (she was reportedly more than a bit tipsy) at the gate. If she was active duty should have been marked as "Line of Duty - No" and she should have been tossed out on a Chapter 9 for that stunt.
Ah, the joy of being a civilian...
Cookie Sewell
Reply to
AMPSOne

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