can't over weather

i don't think you can overdo wear and tear on soviet
aircraft in afghanastan. saw some on the military channel
and man, were they beat looking. some had half the camo worn
off. they looked rode hard, put away wet over and over.
for once, a modeler would have a hard time overdoing it.
Reply to
e
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entered a Hasegawa Rufe in an IPMS regional contest a few years back when I 1st experimented with weathering I used ref from a book on Zeros taken from Japanese archives, Japanese aircraft were like you mentioned above about Soviet aircraft rode hard I had painted the Rufe 1st with a metal finish then over sprayed with IJN green then used a green scuff pad to wear the green paint down to where the bare metal showed through I paid particular attention to the floats and the undersides as these areas would have been subjected to the water spray on takeoffs and landings, in the end didn't win anything for it and most comments were that the weathering was over done and not realistic, but it sure looked good to me
Reply to
Daryl
I think it IS possible to over weather in the sense that weathering can be out of scale and not representative of any real process. I've seen cordite stains coming out of shell ejection slots, hydraulic leaks around cable actuatated control surfaces, natural metal chipping in fabric areas and paint scuffing that a sand storm would not produce.
The point is.... look at photographs of your particular subject. Understand how it is build and operated before blindly applying weathering techniques.
Greg Reynolds, IPMS
Reply to
Greg
yes, but i believe you understood my point.
Reply to
e
Da. Afghanistan was a harsh enviornment and in the last few years, the troops were poorly supplied and had low moral. The a/c got pretty scruffy.
My comments were more for Daryl whose Pete was said to be over-weathered. Without seeing his model, it's hard to comment accurately, but this could be a valid observation. The Pete was not all metal. The wings aft of the rear spar and the conrtrol surfaces were fabric. He could easily have applied his worn-to-bare-metal technique to inappropriate areas. Japanese paint did seem to have very poor adhesion, but photos suggest that it flaked off in chips in high traffic areas rather than wore through. Another point is that the paint would likely be badly faded on an a/c showing heavy weathering.
Greg
Reply to
Greg
No I said I entered a Hasegawa Rufe
Reply to
Daryl
gotcha, and i believe you're correct about that. and of course, you cannot please judges easily nor well.
Reply to
e

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