Repairing plastic

Hi, what would be the best way to go about filling voids and reconstructing edges on plastic items? Not certain what type of
plastic it is but I'm guessing some sort of activator can be used to treat surfaces before applying epoxy/filler/whatever. Think of a cube with small chips, craters, voids at edges and corners.
Trying to avoid anything too liquid and would prefer something more like putty or clay which would not have to be retained while drying and could be sanded easily afterwards.
Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Two sources of information and help would be artist supply shops handling casting materials. Many types of plastic are used for making figurines, etc. The other source would be a dealer in sheet and rod plastics, larger cities usually have one, as these materials are often used for displays and signs, etc.
But without exact knowledge of what type of plastic you want to repair, it's impossible to give you specific advice. Not that i can give much: my experience is limited to styrene and PVC. You can find styrene plastic putty at any good hobby shop. Glue for PVC is available wherever plumbing supplies are sold.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Pearl Paint comes to mind. I have casting/moulding products from them but they are too liquid for this application. However, I can enquire there for something more suitable.

McMaster-Carr comes to mind. Buy from them often and that's the first place I checked. They sell plastic repair putty, activators and just about eveything under the sun for plastics. Knowing what to buy is the problem. I can enquire there too.

It's probably Norly (Polyphenylene Oxide).
Thanks for your help.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Perhaps this will help...
http://www.thistothat.com /
Bill Bill's Railroad Empire http://www.billsrailroad.net
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, Bondo came up in previous "plastic repair" searches but I gather it doesn't work well with plastic. Here is a Googled quote;
======================================================== Also a couple days ago before I posted this thread I contacted Bondo when I got the idea, They just now contacted me back-"Bondo does not work well on plastic, I would recommend using our Dynatron #662 Semi Rigid Epoxy Repair kit." ========================================================
On Oct 12, 1:48pm, "Special Agent Melvin Purvis (Northern California

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/12/2009 10:36 AM vista bill spake thus:
>

Nope, won't help. "This to that" has got to be one of the lamest sources of "information" on the web. Nothing more than conventional wisdom.
Got something better than that?
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm leaning towards one of the putties below from McMaster- Carr...."Use on fiberglass (FRP), metal, wood, and all plastics except polystyrene." . I like the "all plastics except..." bit. But I'm still open to further advice especially if someone has similar experience with a particular product.
===========================================================
Light-Activated Fiberglass Repair Putties and Patch
Permanently repair fiberglass (FRP) with help from the sun or a UV lamp. These products are VOC compliant in all 50 states as of October 1, 2008. Putties Perfect for outdoor work, these glass and ceramic fiber- reinforced putties harden quickly with exposure to direct sunlight or a UV lamp even in extreme cold. Use on fiberglass (FRP), metal, wood, and all plastics except polystyrene. Drill, tap, sand, and paint at full strength. Apply at -20 to +120 F. 3.5 oz. covers approximately 49 sq. in. at 1/8" thick. Polyester resin filler fills gaps up to 3/4". Begins to harden in 30 seconds; reaches full strength in 3 minutes. Operating temperature is -20 to +200 F. Vinyl ester epoxy resin filler has higher strength, better adhesion, and more corrosion resistance than the polyester resin filler. Fills gaps up to 1/2". Begins to harden in 30 seconds; reaches full strength in 5 minutes. Operating temperature is -20 to +250 F. Patch Fiberglass-reinforced polyester and waterproof. Repairs fiberglass (FRP), metal, plastic, concrete, rubber, and wood. Cut to desired size, peel off backing, and press onto surface. Drill, sand, and paint at full strength. Reaches full strength in 5-15 minutes in the sun; 15-30 minutes under a UV lamp. Operating temperature is -40 to +350 F.
===================================================================================

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Maybe not in the poster's case, but it's a really handy site I made a bookmark to. Thanks! *
--
* PV Something like badgers, something like lizards, and something
like corkscrews.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stop by the hobby store and they have some bondo type stuff for filling voids. The model car and so forth people use it a lot. Also you can consider stopping by the auto parts store and in the bondo section is the finishing putty which is basically the same stuff. For corners that are going to be taking abuse, I'd more consider making my own by dissolving some of the plastic in whatever will disolve it and making a paste with that. Some plastics tho don't have dissolvers that work well but you will find that those plastics won't bond to anything. Delrin is one example.
-- Bob May
rmay at nethere.com http: slash /nav.to slash bobmay http: slash /bobmay dot astronomy.net
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

If I understand your question correctly, you need to find something that will attach a tiny piece of plastic to an edge to repair it. Every city has a plastic supplier or fabricator. Bring your piece to them and ask them how to best repair, fill or fix the damaged corners and edges. Mike M
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.