Woodland Scenice Roadbed

I am thinking of using this on a new layout, over 1/2 inch plywood.
Any advice, comments, or suggested usage. I was told to glue it down
using diluted white glue and glue down the track the same way, then
ballast.
Would cork be a better choice?
Any and all comments appreciated.
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Wally
Reply to
Wally
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"Wally" wrote in message
One advantage of cork is that it can be easily sanded. Why sand the cork? To smooth out bumps that may have occured in the roadbed and been unnotice. Also to transition from mainline to siding with thinner (or no) roadbed material. You can use N-scale cork to represent a lower profile line. Cork is also usually cheaper than WS foam.
The only advantages that I know of with WS foam is that it is better at deadening sound and comes in a long roll instead of 3' pieces.
Paul McGraw
Reply to
Paul McGraw
I don't like the classic cork with the wood glue used to hold it down, tack it in place, pain in the can to just get your mainlines done, much less any sidings or anything... a buddy and I found rolls of pretty much flat sheets of cork with the underside already sticky... I think it was a small time thing however, if I could figure out who made it and the like, I would recommend it to everybody
if not, I would usually go with homasote (or sound deadening board) over your plywood base and put liquid nails down to attach the track
Thanks
Brandon
Reply to
N2trains
a buddy and I found rolls of pretty much flat sheets
You're thinking of AMI instant roadbed- tacky on both sides and comes in rolls.
-TG
Reply to
Tim Gill
I think that would be hard to mistake for cork.
Reply to
SleuthRaptorman
I used the WS foam roadbed (HO) over WS white "subterranean" foam.
They both work well, but...
1. the white foam dimensions are approximate, and the height could be off by 1/8" on adjoining pieces if both were out the opposite way. You will need to shim to adjust for that. Otherwise, you will have a slight roller-coaster effect even if you make the adjoining pieces fit by raising the end of the lower one. Put them all in place before gluing and get that part level before dealing with the foam roadbed. Itself. (the above actually pertains to any sub-roadbed you use).
I would NOT go with the foam subterranean risers book suggestion to put plaster cloth over the foam before applying the roadbed. The risers have gaps to allow it to bend nicely and the plaster sinks into the gaps and rises over the solid parts. Make it wavy. Not good.
I really like the foam roadbed. Once you have a smooth sub roadbed, it makes up for tiny imperfections which might make a stiffer material lift slightly. I glue my downs with Foam Tack Glue (WS), but any wood glue will work.
I glue my track down with the same stuff then ballast with diluted white glue (or WS Scenic Cement in the spray bottle). I don't spray the ballast cement, but dropper it on. Spraying is a mess, imho.
I don't use WS ballast. I bough real rock ballast from Arizona Rock. It does not float, absorbs the glue better, etc. I'm converted forever.
Ed. in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com, Wally at snipped-for-privacy@satx.rr.com wrote on 1/11/04 6:41 PM:
Reply to
Edward A. Oates
not tacky on both sides... it was CORK with the sticky on the underside so it was easy to manipulate compared to the strips of cork you would get from somewhere like midwest hobby etc
Thanks
Brandon
Reply to
N2trains
I've used the WS roadbed extensively and like it a lot. Using white glue to affix it to the plywood, and the track to the roadbed, is really easy. I use the glue full strength and spread it out with a scrap piece of cardboard.
The glue has enough consistency to hold the roadbed on curves without tacking it down. The same is true for laying the track, at least until you get to really tight curves, less than 20" radius.
What I really like is being able to rip up the track at a later date if you want to make changes. It is no more difficult than grasping the track and wiggling it until the glue breaks. Then I use a scraper like what you would use to clean a barbecue (the foam block kind) to buff off the back side of the track to remove any residual dried glue.
The WS product is a lot quieter than cork and won't dry out.
Reply to
ScottG
I agree with the white glue as THE way to go because it is so easy, and easy to change at a later date. I don't know why anyone would use anything other than white glue. And it is CHEAP! You just gotta love a product that works great and does it for less money!
As for the foam vs cork debate I forgot about the dry out factor. I agree foam will not dry out and that is an advantage if you are looking for sound deadening. After a few years the cork will dry out and loose most of its sound deadening capability, which was never as much as foam.
Personally I like the sound of the trains on cork and plywood but each person needs to consider what they will find enjoyable.
Paul McGraw
"ScottG" wrote in message
.....
Reply to
Paul McGraw
Same reason as the cork, after about 15 years it dries up, cracks off, and isn't glue anymore. I lost a very nice N-scale layout to this phenomena. This might only occur in arid and semi-arid areas of the world like Phoenix, Albuquerque, Denver in the USA...
Reply to
SleuthRaptorman
Lived in El Paso for 15 years. It didn't rain here in Chicago for 3 months after we moved back here. Family absorbed the humidity out of the summer air....
Seriously there is some differences in dry and high places compared to the rest of the country.
Jim Stewart
Reply to
Jim Stewart
not tacky on both sides... it was CORK with the sticky on the underside so it was easy to manipulate compared to the strips of cork you would get from somewhere like midwest hobby etc -------------------------------------------------- I've seen this in the Walthers Catalog. It might have been made by Faller.
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Reply to
Bill
I have seen the faller stuff, it's not faller, I bought it at the boeing employees train show up in Kent, Washington... I think it was a smaller organization that put it together, they are 100' rolls and got 3 for $10... my friend and I have layed 90% of the track (minus turntable, roundhouse and some of the other service facilities for the motive power on the layout) and we still have 1 and 3/4 of 'em left... it took a TON of convincing to get him to buy 'em, and I think I'm going to buy 'em off of him (I had no use for the cork at the time... but now I do since I'm going to throw an order into a mail order place) for my own layout, it allows me to use plywood and that, and keep it from being raised up an unrealistic amount (midwest cork is a little bit too large for prototypical height from the surrounding land)
I'll post some pictures... I am going into a digital imaging class at my school, perhaps I can modify them there and burn them onto a cd, or snag a trial version of the editing software
Thanks
Brandon
Reply to
N2trains
```````` Wally,
One thing I've heard elsewhere, and surprised no one has mentioned it here.
That is, the Woodland Scenics roadbed, being so soft, compresses easily. This causes a problem after ballast has been applied as this tends to pop granules of the ballast loose if the roadbed gets pushed on too hard - even when glued down.
As I said, this is something I've read from others but have no personal experience with the product. I did check out a sample of it at my LHS, though, and I thought it seemed WAY too soft and consequently I won't be using it on my new layout. Personal preference, that's all.
Everyone around here uses the cork with no problems at all. If it dries, or not, who cares? It's all covered with glued down ballast and scenery treatments and you never see it again.
Something to think about if nothing else...
Regards,
Paul - "The CB&Q Guy" (Happily Modeling 1969 In HO)
Reply to
Paul K - The CB&Q Guy
Wally, Paul,
I've used the Woodland Scenic roadbed for sometime now. On my layout some has been down for about two years with no problems. I have some cork down too and no problems with it either. The WS roadbed is soft and care must be taken when putting it down and when laying track. I use glue, long spikes about every foot and a level to make sure roadbed has no dips or bumps. The level is used again as soon as the track is laid to check the track for the same. I like it better than cork. But cork is fine. If you do use cork and have concerns about it drying out check with some flooring supply companies in your area for cork flooring sealer. Cork flooring is very durable once finished. Also you can get various thickness of cork sheet or cork floor tile for yard areas. Bruce
Reply to
Bruce Favinger

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