Bachmann EZ Track Question

Have a couple of simple questions regarding Bachmann EZ Track.
Although I have a lot of older (1970s vintage HO rolling stock), I am
switching to N scale because I can get more railroad in the space I currently have available.
My plan is to do a fairly small table top layout to get started (probably 3 x 4 feet) and then when the basement room is finally free (darn kids taken a lot of room!) will move on to the big(ger) layout.
For the table top layout, I decided to go with the Bachmann EZ Track. It was a good mid-range choice (looked better than Life-Like, but not as good as Kato, but within the budget).
First question is: Since the layout will be more or less permanent, what is the best method of securing the track to the table top. I am planning on doing a insulation foam on top of plywood base. The track base will be on the foam, obviously. Not planning on anything fancy as far as scenary goes, although that could change.
Second question is: what a good way of powering the auxillary stuff, primarily the switches. The Bachmann switches come with a convenient wiring set up, but the small power controller does have the capability or the wiring hook up to power the switches. I've got some older controllers from my HO stuff with more traditional screw type terminals. Is there any reason those (assuming that they still work) or something like them wouldn't work for powering the switches? Or is there a better method?
Thanks in advance for the help
RED Duke
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Use kato it is much better and less money in the end Will save you headaches for the extra money it costs Glue it down with liquid nails on the foam.

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Don't the track section have holes for screws to secure the track to the platform?

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    I tried that track some time ago. No, it does NOT have screw holes. One certainly can drill some holes and countersink them for #4 screws or smaller. Given what the OP wants to do track nails would not be feasable.

    The switches are the same internally. Therefore your old switches would work fine. Be aware that the bachman EZ track ribbon cable is very fine stuff to work with however! Once you get the three wires seperated and stripped they connect the same way as they would on an Atlas turnout.
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wrote:

I should have looked before posting. My HO Bachmann EZ Track has no screw holes, so I don't suppose the N gauge track would either.
I agree that screws would be better. Especially since the OP said "...more or less permanent". Nails would be difficult to remove. Glue would be a pain also if he ever wanted to take it down.
I think I recall seeing some sort of track clips that can be used though. They mount with screws into the platform and secure the track's ballast with pressure. I'm not sure how attractive that would be.
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Spender spake thus:

Just drill holes and countersink, use flat-head wood screws, and glue a little ballast over them. Simple, reversible and secure.
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On Mon, 12 Feb 2007 11:33:02 -0800, David Nebenzahl wrote:

I have 2 small Layouts, one with a mix of Lifelike and Atlas track on cork roadbed, the other is Backmann EZ-Track, 1st, there is holes in EZ-Track, 1 in the middle it will fit a standard Atlas nail. 2nd, if the layout is on foam I used white glue and nails and have had no problems. 3rd, if you use Bachmann EZ-Track switches there is a problem with the N-Scale switches, the tips of the frogs do not lock well with the blocked rail, this is however easily fixed, simply use some pliers to angle the top of the rails out to meet the other rail and problem solved.
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snipped-for-privacy@Mars.org wrote:

I've found that using hardware to secure track to anything makes for a bit more noise (layout acts as a sounding board) than glue. I have not tried double sided foam tape, but there are some types we use where I work that look like they would work quite well for this type of thing. The scotch brand they use adheres to most anything, but given enough gentle pressure will eventually release.
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On Mon, 12 Feb 2007 22:51:02 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com ( snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com) wrote:

I've been thinking of screwing track onto plywood, then using a layer of Tempur-Pedic foam between the plywood and the bench work. It will probably absorb a lot of vibration.
But I like some noise.
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RED Duke wrote:

I have had good luck using "Phenoseal" a caulking compound that comes in tubes for caulking guns. Building supply houses carry it. It sticks well to plastic and dries clear. I used it to secure a long run of flextrack to a plastic elevated bridge. The Phenoseal bonded to the slippery plastic ties of the flextrack and to styrene plastic of the bridge. It takes overnight to dry, and you want to weight the track down with books or something to keep it in place until the Phenoseal is hard. It should work just fine on blue board insulation foam, although you might try some on a test scrap just to make sure it doesn't attack the foam.

You ought to be able to use HO power packs on N scale. Twin coil switch machines are not fussy, they will throw properly for AC or DC and the voltage isn't critical. If memory serves, N scale locomotives run on 12 VDC just like HO.
David Starr
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RED Duke wrote: [...]>

If you don't want to use caulking compound as suggested by David Starr (it's messy), you could try double-sided carpet tape. Either way, it's not necessary to fasten down the track along every inch of its length. You need just enough to hold it in place - a dab of glue or a patch of tape every 6" to 12" is enough. A bit of ballast along the outside edges will eliminate the unrealistic perfect edge of the plastic ballast, and will also help hold the track.

If you are using conventional DC, use different power packs for train control and auxiliary controls. Turnouts need 12-20V DC or AC, so your old HO controllers are just right for this use. Use another of them for controlling house lights and street lamps, etc. If you plan to run more than one train at the same time, you must have a power pack for each one. The HO packs will work with N, though you will find that most N scale locos reach their prototypical top speeds at about 6v.
The speed of a model train is fairly easy to estimate. One 50 ft boxcar passing a given point in one second is about 40mph. One full length (80 ft) passenger car passing a given point in one second is about 55mph.
BTW, use only water-based latex contact cements for gluing foam to itself. Don't use the solvent based ones, they will dissolve the foam (and they will do nasty things to your delicate insides.) You can also use white glue, but it's not as strong. I've found quilter's pins (T-shaped) useful for temporary and permanent pinning of stuff to foam.
Oh, one final suggestion: If haven't already planned to do so, I suggest you frame the underside of your layout with 1x1 or 1x2 strips. It will add strength, but it also provides a space for running the wires. That way, you can also use lighter plywood -- 1/4" luauan plywood glued and stapled to the strips will be quite strong enough.
HTH
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