how to clean old 00 guage track



If that were the case then I expect the OP would have just tried the track to see if it worked.

ditto.
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Ray wrote:

Well, that's one of those apparently simple questions that turns out to be more coml0picated than it seems.
What is it, exactly? "Old OO gauge track" could mean all kinds of things. For example, is it old Triang track? Unless you want to run old Triang trains on it, it's not worth keeping (but some die-hard Triang fan may be grateful to get it.) Etc and so on and so forth.
General comment:
If it's made of brass, dump it. The oxides that form on brass are insulators, and you'll be forever cleaning the track, especially if you smoke (which I hope you don't, as cigarette money is is better spent on model railways!)
Otherwise, use washing up iiquid, or a mild, non-abrasive and non-corrosive cleanser, plus a tooth brush, to clean off the dirt. Do not use sandpaper or "track rubbers" to clean the rails, use steel wool instead. And a magnet to pick up the bits. Abrasive cleaners leave scratches, which have two bad properties: they casue sparking, and they accumulate gunk, both of which lead to even dirteir track than yoy started with. Once you've cleaned the rails with steel wool, use a metal polish (the anti-tarnish kind works best) to polish the rial head.
However, if the rail is really dirty, I wouldn't bother cleaning it. Track is relatively inexpensive compared to the value of your time. Not to mention that cleaning dirty track is not likely to sweeten your disposition. ;-)
HTH
--
Wolf Kirchmeir

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many thanks to all of you for your comments. After reading all the above and looking at the track again i think its probably not worth my while and pain in trying to get it all cleaned up and to be honest some of it looks rather tatty.
So its looks like an ebay and shopping trip coming up.
Cheers ray
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In uk.rec.models.rail, on 10 Sep 2008, Ray announced:

Hi everyone,
I have some track in a similar condition, and one thing I was thinking of doing, is weathering it (a bit more), and using a pile of it as scenery, as in old track that has been replaced, but still left by the side of the track awaiting removal.
You could also do the same thing but lay a 'track' of it, very rusty and covered in weeds, as a disused (and disconnected from the mainline) old line.
Just my thought on a couple of other things you could do rather than just bin it :)
Regards
Quentin.
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OgO wrote:

Good ideas, all, IMO. The latest Model Railroader has a couple of articles on how to model different types of track - mainline, sidings, industrial spurs, disused branch lines, etc. Worth a look, even though it's American prototype. Weeds look much the same everywhere. ;-).
And you can, erm, "accidentally" find yourself crossing a slew of different rail lines on your next drive in the country, "just a mo' while I take a couple of photos..." ;-)
--
Wolf Kirchmeir

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One of my earliest "model railway" attempts as opposed to a train set on a board featured some very rusty Tri-ang series 3 track.It got that way after I had set in polyfilla to imitate inset track. Some may remember this had sleepers spaced widely apart in a far from realistic look. However to my 12 year old eyes it looked alright for a narrow gauge line so I built one. No particular scale but close to what has become O 16.5 . Stock was very crude being home made cardboard bodies on some 3 rail Hornby Dublo wagons I had been given but had never been able to use. Diesel outline Loco was on a Tri-ang clock work chassis that I had also been given, the whole inspiration coming from a clay pit line a couple of miles away which was actually 3ft gauge. The clockwork meant that the rustiness of the track and the metal axles of the wagons were of no consequence. The whole caboosh only lasted a few weeks till the end of some school holidays but it was fun at the time. G.harman
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

<cloth cap mode> <Cue Hovis music> "Eee, Lad, That were real modellin' " </Hovis music> </cloth cap mode>
Seriously though, how many would do that sort of thing today I wonder?
Cheers Richard
--
www.beamends-lrspares.co.uk snipped-for-privacy@beamends-lrspares.co.uk
I have become... comfortably numb
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<snip>

Contradict yourself why not!...
plus a tooth brush, to clean off the dirt. Do

<snip the rest of your utter clap-trap>
A proper track rubber is less abrasive than steel wool, and less likely to leave harmful swarf behind, waiting to get picked up into the gears and motors...
--
Wikipedia: the Internet equivalent of
Hyde Park and 'speakers corner'...
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So why did you recommend the Peco one? It's probably the worst possible choice of track rubber.
MBQ
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IYO, and considering that you don't have the brain cells to find a proper nntp server...
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And plenty of others' opinion too, see the post about the Fleischmann one.

IYO. You know full well why I don't use an nntp server, since we've had this argument before.
MBQ
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Indeed, and beauty is in the hands of the beholder, just as the ham-fisted blame their tools...

The only valid reason is that you are using (some might say stealing) someone else's IT/IP resources that mean you can't install your own account/software....
--
Wikipedia: the Internet equivalent of
Hyde Park and 'speakers corner'...
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Thank you for confirming that.

I've only ever seen you describe it as stealing. Funny that, isn't it.
Others understand that it's quite commonplace for an understanding to exist between employers and employess for personal use of facilities such as 'phone, e-mail, etc.
MBQ
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wrote:

..
Does the tax man know ? That 'understanding' is a perk -)
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m...
If you don't tell him, I won't either ;-)
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wrote:

com...
OK ! :-)Autosol Metal Polish
Track cleaning what about the stuff they used to clean Rolls Royce cars with ....... Autosol Metal Polish !
http://thepolishingshop.co.uk/acatalog/Metal_Polish.html
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Jerry wrote:

Huh? Are you saying that dishwashing liqudi is like VIM or other heavy duty, corrosive cleansers? Or maybe in the UK the formulation is different. If it is corrosive, a) I apologise for assuming that it's the same stuff as what we get over here; and b) I think you should agitate for a safer product.
Maybe instead of "other...cleanser", I should have explicitly specified citrus-based cleansers - dissolve not only plain ordinary gunk, but grease, sticky-label glue, and goodness knows what else. Great stuff. And rinses off very nicely in clean tap water.

Oooh, rational argument! Such a rare occurrence on this forum! Nice to see an elevated standard of discussion for a change!

That's why I _explicitly_ referred to a magnet to pick up the bits.
--
Wolf Kirchmeir

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I have had great success using vinegar (any type ). I drop the track into a bowl and let it soak for about 5 minutes and then rinse in clean water. Long lengths entail using a long pyrex dish and passing the sections back and forth.
Steel track cleans up using glass paper and it good for sidings etc.
Never bin it until you have tried.
Regards
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