Triang / Hornby track cleaning car - prototype?

Where I live, hardboard is smooth on both sides. Haven't seen the rough-sided stuff for some time.
Reply to
MartinS
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MartinS wrote in news:45bbe0c9$0$97263$892e7fe2 @authen.yellow.readfreenews.net:
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My local timber merchant sells it by the truck load, 98p a sheet - 2'x 4'
Reply to
Chris Wilson
Hardboard (masonite, or high density fibreboard) can be smooth both sides (S2S) or smooth on one side (S1S), depending on the manufacturing process.
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The hardboard I see for sale in Canada is generally S2S, in 3mm and 6mm thicknesses. I have some older pices with the rough side.
Reply to
MartinS
" ........ I made my son a track cleaner ........ "
Now theres an idea !
Cheers, Simon
The Victorians used to send them up chimneys- we send them into tunnels..... Brian
I think you & Simon have been sniffing the Carbon Tetrachloride again !
Chris
Reply to
Dragon Heart
innews: snipped-for-privacy@v33g2000cwv.googlegroups.com:
Thanks Chris .... will give it a go
Reply to
Dragon Heart
Where I live, hardboard is smooth on both sides. Haven't seen the rough-sided stuff for some time.
My local timber merchant sells it by the truck load, 98p a sheet - 2'x 4'
All the best,
Chris Wilson
They still use it to make / repair the backs of kitchen units ! You can still get it with either a white or natural smooth side.
Plywood is better to use than hardboard as it tends to crumble, especially if it gets even a little damp.
MDF would work too, it's very hard, but do not know about the effect on the track of the resin they use to bond it together ?
Chris
Reply to
Dragon Heart
"Dragon Heart" wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@m58g2000cwm.googlegroups.com:
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A year or two ago someone on here mentioned using a block of wood to clean track so I gave it a go ... tried all sorts of wood/wood products and was distinctly unimpressed with the results.
The rubber sold by the 00 guild as recommended by Jane though is the dogs do-dahs and is the basis of my home made track cleaning wagon.
Reply to
Chris Wilson
There's a big difference between cleaning the rails the first time and maintaining them in a clean state.
Regards, Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg Procter
Either you're doing something very right or something very wrong! I use hardboard sliders mounted under wagons to "polish" the railheads - it works for me.
Regards, Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg Procter
Greg Procter wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@ihug.co.nz:
Horses for courses pay a quick visit to the URL in my sig and look at a few of the images in the "Mk 3" catagory in fact here's the direct link (note no "tiny" URLs -
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They say a picture is worth a thousand words ... well you should soon see why my layout is dirty ...
Reply to
Chris Wilson
Definitely so, the EMGS have exactly the right answer, although not stated as such. They have a fibreglass rod about 13mm dia which will take anything off a rail surface, or indeed any other brass/copper surface. However the cleaned metal does start tarnishing almost before your eyes. They also have a polishing block which puts a nice polish on the rail which helps to maintain the surface. By itself it is no good at cleaning track, but use the 2 in conjunction & they do a lovely job.
Reply to
Kevin Martin
I've got an inkling - no, you don't need to abrade the railheads, you need a rail mounted vacuum cleaner!
Regards, Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg Procter
That's the moment when I oil my track! Without oil my shiney railed track was lasting about 15 minutes before current collection started to fall off. With oil it goes for days of operation.
- problem: the oil on the railheads softens the crud on the wheels. - solution clean the wheels. - advantage; the wheels stay clean if the track is clean.
- problem: the oiled railheads attract dirt. - Solutions; deal with the sources of dirt. clean the rails with a soft wiper of some sort.
Yup, nothing wrong with polishing the railheads.
Regards, Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg Procter
In message , Chris Wilson writes
Nor mine. Being out in the garden, the track needs cleaning regularly, such as at the start of every operating session.
Reply to
Jane Sullivan
In message , Greg Procter writes
Which oil do you use?
- problem: my railway is in the garden. Birds and animals defecate on the track, and leaves and fruit fall onto the track from overhanging trees - solution: trap the cats and squirrels and leave their carcasses out for the crows to dispose of. Pick the fruit before it gets so ripe that it falls off the trees. Buy a "garden blower" to blow the leaves off the layout. - advantage: you get even more birds in the garden - disadvantage: you still have to clean the track regularly, but not so much of it.
Reply to
Jane Sullivan
Greg Procter wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@ihug.co.nz:
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I'm already ahead of you. You might have missed it but earlier in this thread I mentioned an outline design for a rail mounted vacuum cleaner mounted in a carriage that I've actually started work on.
When finished I aim to have a complete train disguised as an engineers train that brushes (or optionally depending on how dirty the track is - rubs), vacuums, oils and polishes all in a single pass.
Reply to
Chris Wilson
"Chris Wilson" wrote
If it shifts leaves and will clear crud from the rail surface as well then I'd suggest having a word with Notwerk Rail, they could do with such a beastie. ;-)
Wonder if you could incorporate a de-icer too?
John.
Reply to
John Turner
"John Turner" wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@eclipse.net.uk:
I know you're being TIC but I have actually given that some thought and potentially it is feasible - additional carriage ahead of the engine fitted with a hot air blower the current demands would be quite high, with everything running you?d have the motor in the engine, a second on the vacuum (although if you were de-icing you?d possibly not need this) and the third for the hot air blower. Additionally you?d have the heating coil to power as well. If you were being really clever you could make the moter for the vacuum power both the vacuum and the hot air blower and run the train backwards when you were de-icing.
... and I have had ice in my garage ... I could apply for running rights on Jane's mainline through the usual Feb snowfall by way of testing. :-)
Reply to
Chris Wilson

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