Beginner with problems.

Hi,
I am having problems using my arc welder. I have completed some basic
welding in the past problem free. This time I am trying to weld square steel
tube together for a peice of furniture. The tube is about 25mm x 25mm hollow
and the steel is about 3mm thick. I have tried electrodes from 2mm up to
3.5mm using every possible amp setting. The electrode will either stick far
too easily and its almost impossible to hold an arc. If I do get an arc on a
different amp setting then the metal burns right through. I have spent 6
hours trying to practise this. I have no problems testing my arcs with a
flat peice of steel.
Any help or links would be appreciated.
Thanks
Luke Ingram
Reply to
Luke Ingram
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i had good luck with 5/64" fleetweld 37 at about 75 amps AC
25mm x 25mm hollow
Reply to
dogalone
I used to repair weld a lot of .065" tubing in the field. I used 3/32" 6011 with straight polarity ( stinger negative ). I used to start low and then just crank it up until it just ran. Once you get good, you can turn up the heat a bit. And you can do very short welds and stitch them together, or do a series of small welds. Run everything you can downhill, and for the other, adjust by doing stitch or spot welds.
It is something that requires a very light touch. I used to burn up a lot of gloves by holding the rod with my free hand for stability. Some days I could weld good one handed, and others I had to use a steadying hand. No magic bullets. No easy ways. Just time, practice, and experience.
Some suggested a 6013 rod, but I never could get the hang of it. A lot of people who saw me butt weld .065" tube with stick were impressed. It wasn't so hard. A two year old kid could do it with twenty years of practice. ;-)
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
I'd double check my ground connection(s). Are you clamping on bare steel directly on one piece of tubing? Its sometimes electrically helpful to clamp everything to one piece of steel or aluminum. Or use a car jumper cable to hook both pieces together until a bead is formed.
If DC Are your amps and polarity correct for that electrode?
Reply to
djtcz
I think the 2mm electrode 6011 style on DC positive with as low amps possible to make the rod burn correctly. You will probably have to start and move fast even though the start is too cold. Go back over the cold start if it's real bad. MIG would be the way to go if you have the talents to acquire one.
Reply to
Zorro

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