Measure output voltage?

--Just curious: if I used my voltmeter to measure output voltage
on my Econotig would I wind up with a pile of slag?
Reply to
steamer
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No, not if you're measuring voltage, and you have the HF turned off. If you tried to measure the amperage with a standard voltmeter, however ... !!
As you probably already know, you'll get different voltage if you measure it when it is actually welding than when it is open circuit. Hmm -- I wonder what you would get if you tried to measure it with the HF turned on -- I'm guessing it would be unpleasant ...
Reply to
Andy
No, it should be fine. I meter welding machines all the time.
On older MIG machines it is the only way to get a true reading of voltage and amperage output. I use a standard Fluke 87 meter with a amperage clamp.
Why would you want to know voltage on a econotig?
BTW the open circuit volts will be much higher than if you are welding so get a friend to meter it while you weld.
BTW anybody who needs a AC/DC 600 amp amperage clamp probe should take a look at these.
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I bought one and it works perfectly. Around $50 instead of the usual $150 - $200. You only have to add the bannana plugs for your meter. Set the meter to Milivolts DC.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Likely the only reading that would be somewhat accurate is for the AC setting since voltmeters are calibrated for AC sine waves. High ripple (that is no or small output capacitors) DC would read wrong. Billh
Reply to
billh
You would think the HF would kill a Digital VOM, but it doesn't. A guy in the lab just proved it a couple of weeks ago when he inadvertently turned off the LiftArc and turned on the HF start.
Reply to
tomcas
We tried an ampclamp with mixed results. On the Dimetrics Centaur supply it works fine, on the Maxstar 152 it was not so accurate. In that case we use a precision shunt.
The Maxstar 152 runs on an automated lathe welder. We measure the voltage when we calibrate the Arc Voltage Controller.
Reply to
tomcas
Just don't count on getting it away with it. I zapped a Fluke 83 while troubleshooting a welder because I forgot to turn off the HF before checking the output.
Fluke's lifetime guarantee is a Good Thing.
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
Steamer - a volt meter draws micro amps, so it won't steal much current. The meter might get zapped - I'd have it on the Highest voltage when striking an arc (HV OSC functional then) but once an arc is obtained, it should be just the normal voltage.
Might think of putting a Neon bulb across the meter leads. Make a rig - so the bulb is across the leads - no meter. Fire up the Econotig and see if it lights up. You should have a resistor in series with the Neon to limit the current in the bulb - maybe a 80k or 100k resistor. The bulb might have one already. Radio shack has them - some in 'modules' with resistors.
If the bulb stays on all of the time, it means the Tig is sending out periodic pulses. If it goes dark during work, then measure the leads with your meter.
Neon fires at about 68 volts. Some resistors and some gases make it near 90.
It all depends on what the volt meter can handle on a specific range. The booklet might indicate this.
Martin
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Many volt meters are True RMS measurements. My Tektronix is that way.
Martin
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
If your meter is one of the cheap ones ($3.99-$39.00) it is probably average reading not true RMS. If it says its "RMS." reading the value will be accurate. Average reading meters are cheaper to make and are calibrated for a sinusoidal waveform not the stuff coming out of newer welders.
Reply to
Mike Swift
I use this one
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Tested against my Amprobe..its dead on the money. Ive not tried it on DC however...(making a note)
Gunner
"Gunner, you are the same ridiculous liberal f--k you ever where." Scipio
Reply to
Gunner
My welding machine repair guy uses Simpson 260s for this.
I just gave him two minty 260-8s in a trade. They drop them, but never burn em out according to him. He laughed when I started to cringe when he was testing out the Tig/Stick 250 Lincoln I bought out of his junk pile.
Gunner
"Gunner, you are the same ridiculous liberal f--k you ever where." Scipio
Reply to
Gunner
I have one like that and it doesn't do DC amps. To dial in large wire feeds I need DC amps. For example: 1/16" dual shield wire has a sweet spot at 23 volts 200 amps. To get the amps right you have to dial the wire speed while somebody else welds.
Most modern 1/16" dual shield wires work best at 23 volts, 200 amps. Being able to dial in the machines faster is a real time saver.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Bummer...sigh
Thanks!
Gunner
"Gunner, you are the same ridiculous liberal f--k you ever where." Scipio
Reply to
Gunner
Oh Great Font of Welding Wisdom!
Might one coax you into sharing the 'sweet spots' for other wires that you might know of?
Did you get the case of diet Squirt I left at the mouth of the cave?
Stuart
Reply to
Stuart Wheaton
1/16" dual shield is thge one we go through at school by tyhe pallet load, so it's settings are tattooed on my brain. It wouldn't be hard to figure out the others. I may have some time soon to dial in some other wires and write them down.
Yes, but where is the leg of roast beast? I don't know how I am supposed to answer all these welding questions without protien.....
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
: Why would you want to know voltage on a econotig? --I've decided to snag a Ready Welder, but they say it needs 12v to operate. It got me to thinking I don't have clue one what the Econotig puts out..
Reply to
steamer
If you get the model# 10250 it comes with a 12v transformer to drive the feeder motor.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
> > > >>>> >> >>> --Just curious: if I used my voltmeter to measure output voltage >>>on my Econotig would I wind up with a pile of slag? >> >>No, it should be fine. >>I meter welding machines all the time. >> >>On older MIG machines it is the only way to get a true reading of >>voltage and amperage output. >>I use a standard Fluke 87 meter with a amperage clamp. >> >>Why would you want to know voltage on a econotig? >> >>BTW the open circuit volts will be much higher than if you are welding >>so get a friend to meter it while you weld. >> >>BTW anybody who needs a AC/DC 600 amp amperage clamp probe should take >>a look at these. >> >>
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>>I bought one and it works perfectly. >>Around $50 instead of the usual $150 - $200. >>You only have to add the bannana plugs for your meter. >>Set the meter to Milivolts DC. > > > I use this one >
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> Tested against my Amprobe..its dead on the money. > Ive not tried it on DC however...(making a note) > > Gunner > > "Gunner, you are the same ridiculous liberal f--k you ever where." > Scipio
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Model #10000ADP (adapter) also comes with the 12V transformer.
Reply to
s-boulet

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