MIG welder settings

I am fairly new to MIG welding. I use the table on my Miller MIG machine to determine voltage and wire speed. These settings are based
on the thickness of the steel. What should you do if you are welding two different thicknesses. For example 10 gauge sheet to 1/4 angle. etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

set it for the thinner base metal.
--
Nathan W. Collier
http://7SlotGrille.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

...but then the thicker metal will suck all the available heat. No? I would think a halfway point would be better and just "wash" the puddle a bit onto the thinner area.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

bit
i run my mig cranked and adjust the speed to fit the puddle. i dont expect a newbie to be able to know how to read his puddle though. its tough to give an absolute recommendation based upon the limited criteria he gave, but running with a setting for the thinner base metal is still my recommendation for anyone who would ask the question to begin with. correcting a cold pass for him will be much easier than correcting a blow through.
--
Nathan W. Collier
http://7SlotGrille.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This would all depend on the welding skill you have, as every welder is different. I would personally have my settings just over the half way mark for the thicker stuff and wash the pool onto the lighter gauge material. However this will require good control of the welding pool.

a
expect
but
recommendation
pass
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

certainly. since he would ask the question the logical assumption is that hes not a professional welder. this is why i recommend setting the machine for the thinner material, _especially_ since he didnt specify position. i pity any newbie attempting to run a hot vertical up pass, its gonna be a nightmare. :-)
--
Nathan W. Collier
http://7SlotGrille.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

machine
Everyone is good at something. And no one is good at everything. I know people who can weld fantastically one way, but not another. Let's say they can do a 1" plate open root 6010, then fill it up with 7018 vertical up, and pass x-ray. But they but can't figure out the on/off switch on a MIG. Sorry, GMAW. Asking about a particular phase of welding indicates a person looking for more information. When you get all the information, you do NOT become a professional. You become a professional the first time you get paid for welding. Once you know it all, all you get is a label ............. "IDIOT."
The first step on the journey to knowledge is the admission of ignorance.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

you can split hairs on terminology if you wish, but my implication was clear. by asking the original question its obvious that he is relatively inexperienced with the process in question. based upon that fact alone, he would be better off running on the cold side especially since he left out the specifics.
--
Nathan W. Collier
http://7SlotGrille.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

he
Ass-U-Me away.
Were it me, I would do as someone suggested. Get a couple of trial pieces to get the heat right, and then weld away on the final pieces.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

certainly. that much should be a given anyway.
--
Nathan W. Collier
http://7SlotGrille.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I welded a small pantry rack today for my RV. The wire was about 1/8" in diameter. I just turned my machine down a little from the setting I use for .065 tubing, and it did fine. I want to fabricate some decorative items from wire, and was wondering something ...............
I like to stitch weld things. It gives an appearance that approaches TIG. I am going to try some pieces, but wanted to ask first to maybe save burning up some pieces. .............
I want good solid welds that hold. I want a minimum amount of filler because of the looks. I usually run my Lincoln 175+ at comparable settings for the current and wirefeed. That is, I put the dials at the same clock positions, and it is a pretty good match. Can I turn up the current a bit to burn a little hotter, or will that cause burnback? Or do I just turn them both up and go with short spot welds?
Anyone have any experience with this? Particularly with small diameter. Can I run it hot if I just keep the spot time short?
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'd pick something in between, somewhat of a comprimise. If in dobt, lean towards the hotter setting (since cold welds are easy to do with mig). With the proper motion and puddle control you should be able to keep most of the heat on the thick piece and move the puddle down onto the thin piece.
-- Lynn "I have opposable thumbs, and I'm not scared to use em" Amick http://www.amickracing.com

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
from what i've learned, best to cut off a few coupons and burn through those until the machine is set 'right'.. then start in on the important piece.
-tony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 20 Nov 2003 17:24:06 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (John Janes) wrote something ......and in reply I say!:
RAG (Rough as Guts) engineering shop 101. Farm/hobbyist stuff.
Ok. I agree with going for something a bit high and working the puddle. But WTF does this _mean_?
Welding is basically a power and time. Too much power and/or too much time and you get burn through, or gouging in thick metal. Too little time * power and you get a cold weld.
Practice.
When you weld, you weave slightly. This is an acquired art and cannot be described to get a neat, true weld. I still fail from time to time.................well from job to job :-<.
Simply put, in order to control the puddle, you weld on the heavier piece, - and probably point the handpiece toward the heaviier piece more.              - this tends to accentuate the force of the plasma flow toward the heavier piece.
You then weave along the weld, moving each weave across to the lighter piece in proportion to the relative thicknesses. If the lighter piece is 1/2 as thick as the heavier piece, then stay with the heavier for 2/3 of the time and only "flick" across to the lighter piece for 1/3. This happens fairly rapidly, not sort of 2 seconds on heavier piece and 1 on lighter. So it is not easy.
Practice.
That's my theory.
Practice.
Practice with heavier stuff (around 6mm) and come downward. It's less soul-destroying. then twist and belt the crap out of your practice pieces, and look at where it broke. That's where you went wrong. Why? I have read _books_ on _that_ subject <G>.
Feel free to jump in, anyone.
Another way is multiple passes. - A NON (or very small) weave, careful weld at the root, based on the lower thickness plus 10%....maybe. - A second pass on the heavier piece at its rating. - A third on the lighter piece at that rating - a weaving pass, to hide the multi-passes, based on the heavire piece and with a slightly slower wire feed, and with a close tip-to-work distance, only _just_ touching the light piece side of the job.
Practice again.
Some rules: - wear long sleeves and trousers. <G>     - seriously. I know a guy who UV'd his his whatevers by welding in shortshorts (what we Ozs call footy shorts). - keep work clean....grind and clean if needed - make edges smooth     - welding an edge that has no "heatsink" from the other workpiece will encourage burnthrough. - on light work, make sure edges are square. This avoids even thinner edges. - if you can weld "hot" (higher current, slower wire) compared to safe, charted values by using your skills, you get a "neater", flatter, weld. It also helps penetration. - allow for or prevent (this take real _force_!!!) weld distortion.     - When the weld is hot, and at its max expansion, it is soft, so there is no force acting on the weldment.     - As it cools and hardens, it contracts.         - But now it's hard.             - all weldments pull into the weld. - be ready to accept that welding is a complex, fascinating and frustrating pastime. I have a love-hate relationship with it. - learn to work outside that table.
- did I say practice?

**************************************************** sorry remove ns from my header address to reply via email
Imagine a _world_ where Nature's lights are obscured by man's. There would be nowhere to go. Or wait a while. Then you won't have to imagine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There are several places on the net that contain good information regarding this subject: http://millerwelds.com/education/library.html http://www.lincolnelectric.com/knowledge/articles/list.asp
I would also recommend that you get a hold of an article written in the September 2003 issue of 4-Wheel & Off Road called "20 Tips to Better Welding" written by Fred Williams. Of all of the articles I have read, this one explained the weave in a most understandable fashion. Contact http://4wheeloffroad.com to obtain a back issue. If by chance you cannot locate the article let me know and I will let you read mine.
Jesse L Zufall Silt Colo snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com To contact me replace one with the number 1 in the email address. *******************************************************
(John Janes)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.