Query about welding a logo onto cast iron

Folks,
I am thinking of welding a cast-iron camp-oven. Not to fix it, but to weld a logo onto the metal lid. Our family property (ranch?) is celebrating 100 years
in our family next year, and we had an idea of personalising some camp-ovens for the people attedning the partay.
I have read a few articles about welding cast metals with a MIG, but I thought I'd ask you sage people.
The weld would simply be a bead on the lid somewhere; no structural work, or expectation for it to retain a lot of strength. However, I wondered if I will fracture the lid in the process, or create a weak spot. All i want to do is run a bead, and then grind it back.
I currently have gasless mild steel wire in the MIG, but also mild steel rods of varying sizes, and some Tungsten rods as well. I can source other wire and/or rods, but I'm not sure what I need.
I read that there are 2 types of cast iron, and one welds okay with care, wheras the other doesnt weld very well. Is this correct?
I also read one article on welding cast with stainless wire, but it was somewhat vague. There was also mention of MIG brazing, but again it lacked specific info.
Any info greatly appreciated. I am going to buy a small camp-oven from the camping store, and experiment with it in the near future. I dont think they are worth very much, so I can ruin a few getting the technique sorted.
Any ideas greatly appreciated.
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Cheers,
Rod...Out Back
For a round-up of the pics I have taken the past 24 months, take a look at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rod_outback /
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For this sort of ornamental only work, the type of wire/rod is not critical. But you will have to do some serious preheat to keep the cover from bowing and cracking. 600F minimum, 800F or 900f would be a lot better. A weed burner directed at the inside while you weld on the outside has a lot of merit.
Cool it slowly by putting it in a bed of vermiculite or ashes. Alternative is to put in in the wife's oven at as high a temp as it goes, back off 50 degrees per hour.
Rod Out back wrote:

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I'd just buy them all a nice new oven. No sense giving a gift that might crack or otherwise fail in use.
Steve
Steve
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Using a Nickle rod/wire will give a nice, shiny, silver-colored "brand" that will stay that way.
If nothing else, it'll give you an excellent excuse to have some on hand so that you'll have it if you actually want to do some real welding on cast iron. <G>
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309L stainless wire would work well for this. I believe you can get a gasless version in fluxcore wire.
Wire feed would definitely give you better control.
You should warm the cast iron up to about 500 degrees before welding to prevent cracking. Then slow cool under a welding blanket or a massive pile of powdered lime.
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Ernie Leimkuhler wrote:

Stainless would look pretty, too!
Would brass work, for a different look?
Just curious.
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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| Folks, | | I am thinking of welding a cast-iron camp-oven. Not to fix it, but to weld a | logo onto the metal lid. Our family property (ranch?) is celebrating 100 years | in our family next year, and we had an idea of personalising some camp-ovens for | the people attedning the partay. | | I have read a few articles about welding cast metals with a MIG, but I thought | I'd ask you sage people. | | The weld would simply be a bead on the lid somewhere; no structural work, or | expectation for it to retain a lot of strength. However, I wondered if I will | fracture the lid in the process, or create a weak spot. All i want to do is run | a bead, and then grind it back. | | I currently have gasless mild steel wire in the MIG, but also mild steel rods of | varying sizes, and some Tungsten rods as well. I can source other wire and/or | rods, but I'm not sure what I need. | | I read that there are 2 types of cast iron, and one welds okay with care, wheras | the other doesnt weld very well. Is this correct? | | I also read one article on welding cast with stainless wire, but it was somewhat | vague. There was also mention of MIG brazing, but again it lacked specific | info. | | Any info greatly appreciated. I am going to buy a small camp-oven from the | camping store, and experiment with it in the near future. I dont think they are | worth very much, so I can ruin a few getting the technique sorted. | | Any ideas greatly appreciated. | |
Make a name plate and attach it with rivits.
| | Cheers, | | Rod...Out Back | | For a round-up of the pics I have taken the past 24 months, | take a look at: | http://www.flickr.com/photos/rod_outback / | | -------
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+1 on that. Make the plate as plain or fancy as you want. Hand stamped, welded letters, cast or CNC machined. If you have a local foundry you might be surprised at how reasonable a cast nameplate is. Then rivet it to the stove or whatever.
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| > | > | > Make a name plate and attach it with rivits. | > | | | +1 on that. Make the plate as plain or fancy as you want. Hand stamped, | welded | letters, cast or CNC machined. If you have a local foundry you might be | surprised | at how reasonable a cast nameplate is. Then rivet it to the stove or | whatever. | |
Indeed.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photoengraving
http://www.metal-etching.com/?source=google&gclid=CILnhdjR_JYCFSEeDQoduFOlYw
http://www.photofabrication.com /
Photo engravers can be found in most any larger city. It is not an uncommon process at all. Business card plates can be had in the $15 to $20 range. Less with an order for a half dozen or so, with ganged art work.
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