question about welding rods

Hello everybody:
I live in Puerto Rico and I am a self taught welder. I have found a problem
with the local welders here. They use on a regular basis the 6013 welding
sticks. I like to use (and think it is best) 6011. We weld here galvanized
steel tubes for fences and much of our daily welding jobs. Whenever I say to
other welders that I use 6011 welding sticks they mock at me and treat me as
if I am an extraterrestrial in welding. However, most of my weldings are
strong and I weld very fast because I don't have to clean much mess after
welding. Are weldors on continental USA using 6013 like here in Puerto Rico?
I have read that every job or different metal has its different sticks. Here
the weldors seems as if they do not know about welding.
Pedro (Peter)

Reply to
PVazquez
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Hola Pedro, Creo que la mayoria de los que se encuentran en este grupo te aconsejeran que el electrodo 6011 es idoneo cuando sueldes hierro grueso y/o sucio y/o pintado.
A cambio, el 6013 se utiliza mas para lamina (material delgada) nueva y limpia. Para lograr la penetracion profunda (resistencia) el 6013 ni es comparable con el 6011. Pues, asi lo considero yo.
Vernon
Reply to
Vernon
6013 is overused in many countries. 6011 is a superior rod for your application as it has much better penetration on galvanized metal.
6011 is the best general purpose stick electrode. Good penetration, and it tolerates a lot of surface crud.
6013 is a great rod for sheet metal, or welds that need to be extremely ductile, but it needs clean metal. 6013 is a low penetration rod.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Then there is 6010......
Reply to
Studly Hungwell
Spanish: O sea, la 6013 es muy efectiva para hierro grueso, esa la uso siempre que trato de soldar placas gruesas, lo que no concibo es que esté tan generalizado el uso de una sola varilla entre los soldadores aquí, cuando los libros de soldadura ni siquiera mencionan que la 6013 sea de algún uso general. La varilla 6011 tiene una desventaja, y es que produce mucho resplandor y hay que protegerse contra las quemaduras. Es útil para cortar, creo yo, ya que en un momento traspasa una varilla de acero y la parte.
English Say, the 6013 is very effective for thick iron, I always use it to solder heavy plates, what I cannot conceive is that the use of 6013 be so generalized among weldors here, when soldering books did not even mention the 6013 even for any general use. Pedro
Reply to
PVazquez
What Ernie answers and posts here is very truly to my question about welding rods. 6013 is overused here in Puerto Rico. But here we don't have many engineers available (though, there are, yes...), and everyone believes that is a genius. I have noticed also that 6011 gives me instant "sticking" between metals, 6013 sometimes fails to stick metals as fast as I need sometimes. Also, I don't have to use the chippin hammer too much. Soldering is very clean. I wanted to confirm these facts. Thanks Ernie. Pedro
Reply to
PVazquez
In article , Studly Hungwell wrote:
6010 is 6011's ugly mean cousin who comes to town every once in a while and beats up have the police force.
6010 will burn through almost anything down to base metal. Too aggressive for general use, but amazing for root passes and nasty metal repairs.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Yes, I know the 6010, but it is very hard to maintain the stick fired. I am using 150 amps +DC (reverse polarity) and I feel that my machine does not have enough power for it. Also, these sticks (I believe so...) have to be maintained 1/8 of an inch precisely so that it does not sticks to the metal. However, it is a very good welding stick. Pedro
Reply to
PVazquez
Ayup. Lots of that stuff here in the earl patch. When I need to stick a couple rusty chunks of anything together than doesnt need pretty...out comes the 6010. Galvanized and needs burnin through? Out comes the 6010.
6010 wears torn up bib overalls..hobnailed boots and has a sack of Redman in the pocket and it dont take shit from nobody
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
Reply to
Gunner
Ernie, I think I've seen you say this before. I've always been a little hesitant to use 6011 as a general purpose electrode, thinking it leaves a more brittle weld than, say, 6013 (or better yet, 7018). I do use it all the time for a root pass when I have poor fit-up issues (can't use 6010 'cause I only have AC). But if I didn't need to follow up with another rod, it would sure save time. I'm talking about home/hobby projects--let's say, for example, a shelf bracket, or the project I just finished, a mobile stand for a power tool, all using mild steel 1/8" or less in thickness. Or the project I'm working on now, a light-duty pickup truck rack made from 1-1/4" square tubing. Would it make a difference if I'm making something out of bed-frame iron (I know, I know, uneven quality of steel, but I use it for projects that don't take a lot of stress)? Thanks for your never-ending insights!
By the way: Pedro, welcome to the newsgroup!
Andy
Reply to
Andrew H. Wakefield
I noticed the same thing in Thailand. All the small welding shops I visited were using 6013 on AC machines. Making lots of ornamental gates and fences. I wasn't sure if 6013 was the only rod available or maybe less expensive or maybe they didn't know any different. In Thailand, everyone welds in the squat position, they don't really have a need for legs on their welding tables (although the concrete floor seems to be the preferred welding surface).
P.S. They also sell acetylene pellets (carbide?) for use in acetylene generators instead of bottled acetylene (although I never actually saw a generator). It made me wonder as I had heard that acetylene generators blow up on a regular basis. Oxygen and propane is the preferred gas cutting mixture.
Reply to
John
6013 was the "defacto" standard for learning to weld, excellent "all position"; provides sound weld on rusted material...
Reply to
dogalone
6011 is excellent for repairs and general welding.
For new clean tube and pipe structures I prefer 7014 since it is so much easier to run and gives lovely welds.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Thank you Andy for welcoming to the newsgroup! today I welded a double gate for a small house entrance and I used 6011. Used a couple of 6013 to compare, but the 1X1 galvanized tubes welded better with the 6011. Not saying that I am using 6011 as an all purpose welding rod, however, to me it is almost the all purpose welding rod. Not to say that I went with my customer to buy welding rods to a supplier of iron products, and they did not have the 6011, they say nobody uses it here! I went to Home Depot and bought 5pounds. I think that I know something that maybe almost everyone of us here may agree, knowledge is not in popular beliefs. PEdro
Reply to
PVazquez
Of course we must start to learn welding with the 6013, the 6011 yields more firepower and that is at least very dangerous. I think every type of welding rod has its purpose and its correct welding procedure. Pedro/Peter
Reply to
PVazquez
In which ways is it more dangerous?
fred.
Reply to
Fred Stevens
So, are my concerns about brittleness misplaced? Is 6011 no more brittle than 6013 or such?
It's interesting that you prefer 7014; I've run some, but often felt that it did not perform as smoothly as some other choices. Maybe I need to try again. Does it tend to need more amps than 6013? or about the same?
Andy
Reply to
Andrew H. Wakefield
Neither is brittle. 6013 is especially ductile, like soft iron bailing wire. That is why it is so good for sheet metal.
About the same.

Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Dangerous in the way that it produces much splatter, like fireworks (the 4th of July fireworks, imagine!)... You have to cover yourself because it burns a lot from flying balls of molten iron. Pedro/Peter
Reply to
PVazquez
Let us check the type of work we are doing and the type of rod we need. Am I correct? Pedro/Peter
Reply to
PVazquez

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