Quincy Air Compressor

Not quite welding related, but shop related. Please indulge me for a
moment.
I'm inches away from purchasing a Quincy upright 60 gallon compressor. It's
model # 241C60VCB for those interested. Here is a picture I found off the
web:
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The only difference seems to be the color. The one at the local welding
shop is Blue and the one in the picture is red.
My question is on the mounting. I don't want to drill holes in my concrete
to mount it since I may move it in the future. Is there any serious concern
for this thing tipping over if I just place it on the floor? This is for a
home shop (my garage) to run air to my Plasma cutter and sand blaster. The
sears 30 gallon upright is driving me mad. Loud as hell.
Thanks for any insights.
Jim
Reply to
Jim Meyer
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It won't tip over (unless you kick it), but it will walk on you. They really do need to be anchored. Will it be against a wall? If so, you can secure it to the wall with some all-thread and base plates, one on each side of the tank. Secure the all-thread through the vertical part of the compressor mounting plate just above the tank, one on each side.
Personally, I have an 80 gal. compressor, and I did bolt mine to the floor (using some rubber blocks as insulators - helps a bit with the noise). I used some concrete shields and lag screws. If I ever move it, I'll just unbolt it, fill the holes with some concrete crack filler, and be done (nothing left sticking up from the floor).
Reply to
Tom Lawrence
Jim,
You don't have to bolt it down. They are quit stable. Mine rest on 3/8 " rubber pads, one under each leg. It doesn't walk and works very well in this configuration.
Eric D
blaster. The
Reply to
Eric D
You're lucky... mine would be across the shop by now. I ran it for a couple of weeks without bolting it down, and every few days I would have to bear-hug it and move it back into position... either the fan cage was leaning against the wall, or it was straining the flex hose into my shop plumbing. And yes, the floor is level :)
Reply to
Tom Lawrence
I'd feel a little better if you left if on the skid (or built a new one). These things get a bit top heavy. 36" sqaure would be good. You can keep it from creeping around by a strip of wood held down with construction adhesive.
Jim Meyer wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
When I installed my I-R compressor ( 80 gallon, 2 stage ) I was worried about it "walking" too. I just left it on the pallet it was shipped on from the factory and cut it down to about 2 feet square and it all works fine.
Good luck,
Reply to
Chuck
Thanks for the input guys.
I was originally going to leave the compressor on the shipping palette that it came on but the space it takes is more than I can invest in at the moment. Cutting it down to a smaller size seems a viable option, as does adding rubber feet. Any hints on where to get the rubber feet? I assume it is just some thick rubber attached to some threaded steel. Correct?
Jim
Reply to
Jim Meyer
I am sure that they are recommending something a bit more like this:
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You can accomplish something similar with cut door mat or tire. I happen to keep mine on a pair of 4x4 skids. I did this primarily to get better access to the drain and have found I have no need for the rubber. YMMV.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net
Reply to
DanG
Forgot to mention on my I-R the tank drain is on the bottom, very inconvenient to get to. I plumbed the bottom bung with an ell and used a short pipe nipple to bring the drain valve to the edge of the tank. Now it the drain is very easy to access. The other mod that would be cool is to use an air brake tank condensate drain valve like those used on truck tractors ( spring loaded with the cable attached ).
Chuck
Reply to
Chuck
As to the inconvenience of gaining access to a compressor's bottom drain here's what I did.
I have an 18 wheel truck with air brakes. It has what I will call "wiggle valves" for lack of the proper name.
The valve is activated by a steel cable lanyard looped through an eye in the valve. The other end of the cable is attached to any convenient and reachable point.
To bleed it off I just tug on the wire. I bought several of these at a big truck dealership (International) for about $5.00 each. They have the same thread as my compressor. And they even had some nifty red sealer material painted onto the threads.
It is way better than getting down on my foursomes and unscrewing a butterfly valve.
VT Chuck wrote:
condensate
Reply to
Vernon
Blink blink...good idea.
I simply screwed in a street EL, a chunk of pipe long enough to get it out from under the tank and a $3 ball valve from Horrible Freight.
Later on, I replaced the valve with an electric solenoid, a cheap digital timer and it did it automatically. 10 seconds every 4 hours the compressor was actually running.
Gunner
Rule #35 "That which does not kill you, has made a huge tactical error"
Reply to
Gunner
I bought some rubber levelling feet from Enco for my Porter Cable 60 gallon compressor. I've never had any problems and the additional height of the feet makes it easier to stick my hand underneath to access the drain valve.
Reply to
AL
Something like this?
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Does it keep the compressor from walking? Any problems with stability?
Reply to
Jim Meyer
Hum - Enco now forces cookies and only Internet Explorer and AOL/Netscape. Mozilla doesn't function even though it does on other sites wanting cookies.
Martin
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn

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