Air Compressor Rebuilding

I recently picked up an old Wayne 5 HP two stage air compressor. It
certainly needs gaskets and a shaft seal and I was told it needs rings
and valves. Is it common to have to bore the cylinders on a compressor
when replacing rings in the same way that you do on an engine?
Also, the tank paint is a mess, are there any issues with sending the
tank out to be sandblasted prior to painting?
Lastly, does anybody know of a good source for parts for this monster?
It is probably a series 5200 Wayne.
Thanks,
BobH
Reply to
BobH
Loading thread data ...
This returned even less useful information than "wayne compressor parts" which is the first thing I tried.
BobH
Reply to
BobH
Bob, is that the same Wayne that makes sprinkler pumps?
Are they still in business (I bought a Wayne pump 4 years ago so if that is the same company, they may still be around).
Reply to
Ignoramus23604
Thanks for the reply. I don't think it is the same Wayne. These guys were owned by Dresser Industries and it looks like they died or got sold in the 80's. There is still a Wayne in the gas pump business that might be part of this company. There was also a comment I ran across that they might have been sold to LeRoi, but that hasn't yielded any parts either.
BobH
Reply to
BobH
I needed to rebuild a 5 hp Saylor Beal a few years ago, and found it much cheaper to replace the compressor.
formatting link

Reply to
Elliot G
This is an extreme PITA. I had a Dresser compressor pump a year or two ago that I sold.
formatting link
All my attempts to figure out anything about it went nowhere. All that information became a victim of a serial corporate restructuring. The pump was amazing, but there was nothing at all to be found about it.
Good luck and keep us posted.
Maybe you can call some of the places that sell Wayne pump parts and ask them what happened.
Reply to
Ignoramus23604
formatting link
I found a parts kit for it at Central Air Compressor Parts in Michigan for $560. If the tank and motor are in usable shape, the choice becomes rebuild the existing or replace the pump. I have seen pumps in the $200 - $300 range.
Thanks, Bob
Reply to
BobH
Yep, the math of repair vs replace surely is not easy in this instance.
As for the price, I have seen whole 80 gallon Quincy QR25 compressors (sans motor) in $200 range.
Bob, can you clarify why exactly do you think that you need to rebuild this pump? What is wrong with it?
i
Reply to
Ignoramus23604
All that I know is wrong is that the shaft seal is leaking because the lower side of the pump and half the tank were covered in oily goop. The people that I bought this compressor from said that it was pumping slower than it did. I think that I am going to try to replace the shaft seal and set it up and see if it works adequately for what I want. If it does, the expensive work can be put off.
Where have you seen the QR25's in that price range? The pressure lubricated Quincy compressors are what I really wanted.
Thanks, BobH
Reply to
BobH
Does it leak when just sitting around in the OFF position?
I would try to quantify the leak before doing any repairs. It would probably be a bigger issue if you had to run your compressor for 8 hours a day. Maybe the leak is not that big in relation to how much you use it.
I am very doubtful that these people could make a good guess about "running slower than before". You can measure the time it takes to fill your tank from zero to, say, 100 PSI, and compare it with some other compressor, the math is very easy and gives you the CFM.
Your CFM = the other guy's CFM * your tank size/his tank size * his fill time / your fill time
I hope that I did not get this equation backwards, but if I did it should be easy to correct.
I bought a Quincy compressor with a QR-25 model 340 head (rated 5-10 HP), on a 80 gallon tank, from a Craigslist seller for $200. Due to peculiarity of negotiation, I did not take the motor. (I said that the motor is old crap and I do not need it, that lowered the price quite a bit, and was probably true anyway). But I had a 10 HP motor at home anyway, which I promptly installed.
Pictures are here
formatting link
I had to install a new 10 HP motor and a new pressure switch.
Reply to
Ignoramus23604
I'm not familiar with that exact model, but if it is not a pressure-lube pump then that oil film may be from the sump breather? (Mine does that anyway)
MikeB
Reply to
bq340
Why not give it a try as it is now, without rebuilding anything. Find out what, if anything , is wrong with it, and decide then what to do? Lower output from a compressor is usually a resuly of faulty valves. If the outlet valve is leaking, it usually leads to a higher than normal head temperature as well as lower output. This is because the air the has been compressed is hotter than the inlet air. When it leaks back throught the valve it is aready hot from compression, and is heated again when recompressed, giving a tot head. Leaking inlet valaves don't affect the head temperature. If the lubricating oil hasn't run out or gotten below the splash fins on the connecting rod, cylinder and ring wear is usually fairly minimal and ,unless it has a lot of hours on it, is usually acceptable. The shaft seal is probably available at a local bearing supplier. You may find that cleaning and /or relapping the valves is all it needs. I wouldn't sandblast the tank as it can work harden the tank and lead to fatigue crack forming in higer stressed areas of the tank.Just give it a thorough scrub wit a rotary wire brush, use a good primer and pait it.
Reply to
Grumpy
This one is a pressure lube. I think it also has a low oil pressure switch, but it might just be a low level float switch.
I don't know if the pump leaks while just sitting. I just got it home Monday and have not finished cleaning it up or assembling it. The previous owners took the motor and pump off the tank to make it easier to move.
Thanks, BobH
Reply to
BobH
Well, does it really need rings? What type of valve is used, disc or leaf? The disc valves might be resurfaced and reused, the leaf valve shouldn't be real expensive. Gaskets and seals shouldn't be too bad, either.
I'm no expert, but unless it was run out of oil, the cylinders generally shouldn't need reboring, unless it has a HUGE amount of hours on it.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
Yup, replacing parts because somebody ELSE thought they might be shot would be a big mistake.
Yeah, I've got a 1968-vintage small (2 Hp) Quincy that is still in fine shape. When I got it, it had a 1 Hp motor, and ran all the time, with a pneumatic unloader control. I converted it to a 2 Hp motor, and put on electronic controls to unload for short idle periods and shut down after longer idle. I had to put on a new safety release and replace the air filter element, and buy oil. That's IT! Quincy sure makes a good compressor!
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
Thanks, this is good to know about. I found a rebuild kit today and it is expensive ($560). Now I need to really evaluate what condition it is in. I will clean it up and run it to see what it needs.
BobH
Reply to
BobH
I think that they are some kind of disk valve, but I have not been inside it yet. time to finsh cleaning it up, re-assemble it and try it.
BobH
Reply to
BobH

Site Timeline

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.