Compressor identification

A young fella at work brought in a compressor head that he picked
up out of the junk. He wants advice and help on fixing.
Good/excellent condition vertical 60 gallon tank. Old and heavy.
The castings, paint, and shape would appear to predate 1950.
V twin 2 stage.
Big cylinder 2 1/2
Little cylinder 1 3/8
Reeds are shaped a bit like a lava lamp.
Back check/unloader is a fist sized bronze casting with a brass
thin shell sleeve inside pushing a rubber "washer" like end, no
spring.
2 journals on the crank. Each journal has two bronze looking rods
on a bronze pivot block.
Heavy copper lines with cooling fins.
No brand or ID except for one in the crankcase casting. Fine
lettering around the perimeter which says Made in the United
States of America. There may have been 3 letters in the center of
that area, though they have been obliterated or were mis-cast.
The exterior paint is mighty uniform, and would appear to be
factory (I know there are no guarantees) - it is a dark green,
darker than SpeedAire or John Deere, but not all the way to Hunter
Green.
We tore it down some to see the rings, etc. The cylinders are in
excellent shape, the pistons look great, the rings seem OK to me.
Tore down the reed plates. The piston side has two lava lamp
shaped reeds{one flat against the port, one arched to pressure the
ends, not the center} above each piston (one large, one small)
held in location with an aluminum plate with holes and the two
reeds trapped in a recess. One of the large ones is eaten
through. All should probably be replaced as I can feel the
"ditch" where they have been hammering against the port.
Had him take a cylinder and a reed plate down to a local
compressor repair shop. "Boy, that sure is a heavy duty
compressor, but I've never seen anything like it." Same at
another one. I've not gone out to the Quincy source, yet.
Any ideas about brand?
Any ideas about parts source?
Any ideas about a satisfactory reed material? The big ones are 2"
long and 1" wide where they are fat in the center. Kinda rules
out using feeler gauges I know about.
Reply to
DanG
Loading thread data ...
Sounds like a Worthington head...
Reply to
kbeitz
Ingersoll Rand:
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DeVilbiss:
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Rol-Air:
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Quincy:
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Another Ingersoll:
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Gardner-Denver:
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Something weird: The Fu-Sheng OLD series:
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A bunch of LeRois:
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See this page:
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That was fun. I'd forgotten how many old compressors there were, and I'm sure there are a lot more.
Dan
Reply to
Dan_Thomas_nospam
Like this?
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Dan
Reply to
Dan_Thomas_nospam
Worthington valves would appear to be long rectangular strips.
Reply to
DanG
Dan,
I hope there are some more. I looked at all the pictures you linked, but it is amazing to me that as similar as they all are, how totally different each is. I had forgotten the Rol-Air and the LeRois.
The air intake on the one I need are on the top of the head in the center. The dark green on the one you identify as a Quincy is about right (I thought Quincy had always been blue)
The UK entry is not it, but I had not ever seen one with the motor direct drive before.
Keep sending ideas.
Reply to
DanG
If you have to make the valves, most tool suppliers have steel shim stock that might be suitable.
Don Young
Reply to
Don Young
I'm pretty sure it is not a Quincy, all the ones I've seen use cast iron disc valves that last forever. That makes it easy to install an unloader, too.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
The Quincyies I know all have unique unloader cylinders (valves?) on top of the heads. This is not like any Quincy I know about. The reason to go there would be to hopefully see one more compressor guru.
Reply to
DanG
Run the valves by a motorcycle speed shop and ask for 2 stroke reeds to look at?
Reply to
Mark Dunning
Remember that the compressor itself can be mounted any number of ways an a tank or frame, driven direct or via belts, painted any color, and so on. Depends who is engineering the overall assembly. Look at things like the bearing end caps to note similarities between what you have and what you see in the pictures. Compressor manufacturers often minimize their inventory between various models by using common end caps and other parts.
Dan
Reply to
Dan_Thomas_nospam

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