replacing wooden maul handle with steel one? (2022 Update)

Hi, the wooden handle on my maul is about to break off and I was wondering whether instead of the usual repair it would be better to TIG on a steel handle. I thought I'd use some 1" sched 40 black pipe. What I doubt is the composition of the maul head. Aren't most of them forged? And if so isn't that just like most other low carbon steels? Any advice appreciated.

Reply to
zeb7k
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Adding a steel handle really changes the balance of the maul, and not for the better. It is also pretty tough on the hands, the vibration just travels up the handle. There are some "monster mauls" with steel handles used for splitting wood, just horrible to use.

You could TIG it > Hi, the wooden handle on my maul is about to break off and I was

Reply to
RoyJ

In short, no.

Replace it with a good wood handle (get one where the grain does not run off to one side, and is oriented correctly - also, fit it carefully), and either improve your aim, or put a piece of radiator hose over the handle near the head.

Steel handled mauls are uncomfortable to use, and the steel handles snap off.

Reply to
Ecnerwal

I replaced the wood handle with fiberglass handle and added a rubber shock adsorber sold for sledge hammers and splitting mauls after a teenager broke the wood one. Don't know if it is all that much better, but it has lasted a good many years. On the other hand, I haven't hired anyone for the same length of time.

Dan

Reply to
dcaster

now that everyone has told you NO, let me tell you about a maul that was made with a metal handle and its issues.

First, the maul was a wod splitting maul, and was completely fabricated with an arc welder, 3 pieces fo 1/2" steel plate to form a trangle with a 1-1/2" pipe for a handle, I cant give you exact measurements, as it is my fathers and i dont want to ask and get tricked into splitting wood for an hour or two :)

anyway, lead weights were melted and put into the head end of the maul to help balance it out. the sucker was heavy regardless, but balanced.

it has lasted over 10 years with the only modifications being A)wrapping 2 layers of black tape for grip, not padding. and B) two strips of 1/4" foam along the length to help orientate the blade direction, NOT for padding.

onyl problem that i can reallr remember is that if you REALLY missed, you bent the handle and had to swing HARD to miss again with it reversed to straighten it out.

Reply to
Tater

and there is the shovel my dad TIGed a stainless pipe for a handle (currently 25-30 years old- still works)

Reply to
Tater

I have arc welded to my maul ax a steel handle and that was maybe 15 years ago still attached but now use a pellet stove. we have a small ballpeen we weld a 1" pipe handle can take a liken and keep on bangin. ED

Reply to
Ed ke6bnl

There is a 4 lb. clubbing hammer at my work with a steel handle. Pipe handle was passed through the eye and welded to the head at the top (where you normally would insert wedges in a wooden handle). Can't say I have ever seen anyone use it and don't know who modified it but anyone who sees it for the first time picks it up for a closer look.

- Regards Gordie

Reply to
The Nolalu Barn Owl

We had a small sledge that had lost its handle so in desperation I welded on a pipe. The thing is still around but it is our last choice. It just is not balanced properly as well as transmitting all the vibration. I have to admit that after people crack all the other sledge handles that stupid thing is still around and ends up our choice when desperate. Randy

There is a 4 lb. clubbing hammer at my work with a steel handle. Pipe handle was passed through the eye and welded to the head at the top (where you normally would insert wedges in a wooden handle). Can't say I have ever seen anyone use it and don't know who modified it but anyone who sees it for the first time picks it up for a closer look.

- Regards Gordie

Reply to
R. Zimmerman

I can say that every pipe or steel handled hammer I have used either felt weird, was slippery, or sent painful shock waves through me.

As you say, I , too, will use one when all the other hammers are kaflooey, but just as a last resort.

That doesn't happen now that I'm the only guy in my shop, and miraculously, hammer handle life is a lot longer than when I worked in shops.

Steve

Reply to
Steve B

I think the splitting maul we put a steel handle on did not vibrate because we filled the end of the pipe with lead.

as for feeling weird, I believe that is because pipe are round while handle are oval, like i said before, we put two strips of weatherstripping lengthwise to help "ovalize" the pipe.

and the reason we put the black tape on was that the maul kept slipping out of our hands (and going airborne!)

Reply to
Tater

Everything you mention is something I don't want happening when I'm swinging

4-16#s around the room.

I like the feel of a balanced hammer with a secure proper handle. If something bad does happen, it's not because of jerry rigging or cheapskating. When something bad happens because of those things, it just seems to hurt more.

Steve

Reply to
Steve B

On the all steel handle -

Put a band of duc(k) tape near the head or mid handle. I'd taper the buildup and that will damper various frequencies.

The bar is a transmission line - mechanical not electronic type and sends waves up the handle to the teeth. Put a point of reflection.

It could be a welded washer but that might be dangerous...

Martin [ my shovel with a 2" galv pipe really rocks. It is a good steel blade and the heavy handle is good for slicing down the edge of a hole.]

Mart> We had a small sledge that had lost its handle so in desperation I welded on

Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn

My query is, I got a old Craftsman brand 6-lb splitting maul that I wouldn't mind trying to restore to usable condition. Obviously needs the handle replaced. The new model Craftsman splitting mauls like this (that I've seen online) don't have the wooden handle. I'm just wondering how I could maybe acquire a new wooden handle that will fit this maul just right. Seems to be a pretty limited selection of replacement handles these days at the home centers, and hardware stores where I live anyway. It would need to fit just right of course. Are all [url=

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type of handles for axes, mauls like this, etc, pretty much the same standard configuration, and pretty much any generic handle about the right size will fit, or not?

Reply to
Mike Larson

My query is, I got a old Craftsman brand 6-lb splitting maul that I wouldn't mind trying to restore to usable condition. Obviously needs the handle replaced. The new model Craftsman splitting mauls like this (that I've seen online) don't have the wooden handle. I'm just wondering how I could maybe acquire a new wooden handle that will fit this maul just right. Seems to be a pretty limited selection of replacement handles these days at the home centers, and hardware stores where I live anyway. It would need to fit just right of course. Are all [url=

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type of handles for axes, mauls like this, etc, pretty much the same standard configuration, and pretty much any generic handle about the right size will fit, or not?

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Reply to
Jim Wilkins

MSC has a decent selection of Hickory wood handles in stock. Measure the hole, find something close, and adjust to fit with a spoke shave... (a good heavy pocket knife will do). I have gotten hand hammer and sledge hammer handles from them, but I prefer the feel of a wood handle. I do have a sledge with a plastic coated glass handle. Its tough, but I still prefer a wood handle. Less jarring to my arms and shoulders.

Reply to
Bob La Londe

MSC has a decent selection of Hickory wood handles in stock. Measure the hole, find something close, and adjust to fit with a spoke shave... (a good heavy pocket knife will do). I have gotten hand hammer and sledge hammer handles from them, but I prefer the feel of a wood handle. I do have a sledge with a plastic coated glass handle. Its tough, but I still prefer a wood handle. Less jarring to my arms and shoulders.

---------------------- Bob gave the right answer IF you own a spokeshave. They aren't as generally useful around the (old) house as a block plane because they don't offer as much self-guidance to keep the cut straight and flat -- which makes them ideal for the curves of the handle socket.

A wood rasp (very coarse file) used cross-grain removes hardwood about as quickly as anything short of a hatchet or chainsaw. To fit the handle snugly to the hole, hold the head close over a candle flame to soot the hole, press the handle in until it jams and remove it, then file down the black contact spots on it. Beveling the end of the handle may help by showing the areas where a lot of wood must be removed. It's tedious but good practice, and a lasting reminder not to misuse the tool.

These help the handle last much longer:

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Reply to
Jim Wilkins

If you lack tools and/or experience with them, the Nicholson 8 inch 4-in-1 Hand Rasp and File at Home Depot is a good start, partly because the ends are safe to grab without having to fit handles. It isn't the best choice for any particular task but it's good enough for a wide range of them.

Reply to
Jim Wilkins

A sharp lock blade pocket knife and some care will do in a pinch. A fixed blade work shop knife will also do the job. Just keep it sharp and be careful. Razor knives however suck for this kind of work. To small and to easily damaged.

Reply to
Bob La Londe

A sharp lock blade pocket knife and some care will do in a pinch. A fixed blade work shop knife will also do the job. Just keep it sharp and be careful. Razor knives however suck for this kind of work. To small and to easily damaged.

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I fully agree, however this line:

"It would need to fit just right of course. Are all .. type of handles for axes, mauls like this, etc, pretty much the same standard configuration, and pretty much any generic handle about the right size will fit, or not?"

suggested to me that the OP may not be familiar with woodworking tools, so I decided not to mention any of the more aggressive and perhaps dangerous ways I might fit a new wooden tool handle, like with a shingle hatchet or drawknife. You never know who will read this stuff.

Reply to
Jim Wilkins

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