Tube and 'sleeve' sizes question

I need information about tubing sizes.
I want to make a boat building shelterI made up the ribs and next need to set up the building ladder and set the planks on a little
double ended dory. My shop floor space is just too small to allow for an easy and efficient finishing up of this boat.
To make the shelter I thought Id use metal tubing covered with a tarp. I want to have the structure up for around a month at a time and then take it apart for easy storage. I intend to make a structure with dimensions 10x16; peak roof with pitch of about 4/12.
My initial thought was to use 1 EMT for the framework. There are fittings commercially, available that join EMT forming enabling tent corners and roof peaks. E.g. http://www.creativeshelters.com /
It want to make them myself. (I do stuff like this on weekends for fun my paid job is in an entirely different universe.)
I checked with the local steel supplier and at Russell Metals web site and simply cannot find steel tube that would fit nicely over the 1 EMT. Nominal 1 EMT is around 1.163 and I need a over-sleeve size ranging between 1.17 and 1.19, I think.
I have some steel tube in my scrap pilepicked up at the local scrap yardthat measures just about 1.000. (some sections a little under and some a little over 1.0) This fits perfectly inside the EMT so I thought I might make the fittings work this way.
From the on-line catalogue it appears that regular nominal 1 steel tube is about 1.050 which would be too big to fit inside the EMT.
You can probably see where what I am trying to accomplish here. What suggestions would you make for making up this canopy structure. In particular are there any ms steel tubing sizes close to the 1 range that nicely mate for the purpose I am thinking about?
Thanks, David
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David, where are you?? I know you want to make it but I have a 10 X 20 that we bought several years ago for 2 graduations and a family reunion...since then it has been in storage. Bought it really cheap (under $200 US ) and it could easily go to a new home...
I need information about tubing sizes.
I want to make a boat building shelterI made up the ribs and next need to set up the building ladder and set the planks on a little double ended dory. My shop floor space is just too small to allow for an easy and efficient finishing up of this boat.
To make the shelter I thought Id use metal tubing covered with a tarp. I want to have the structure up for around a month at a time and then take it apart for easy storage. I intend to make a structure with dimensions 10x16; peak roof with pitch of about 4/12.
SNIP!!
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Victoria, BC, Canuckia.
--
I used to be an anarchist but had to give it up: _far_ too many rules.

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Hi Kerry, I'm at Duncan on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. And, yeah, I'd buy one if it was looking for a new home. Ciao, David
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I've looked at their site before, the items from creative shelters look pretty expensive, especially when you figure your structure will need 9 of them. (or not, $100 to solve your problem is somewhat reasonable) One thing in their favor is that they are galvanized/plated for corrosion resistance. Something you may not need.
You might start with a decent listing of the readily available tube/pipe sizes: http://www.rondexter.com/professional/rigging/telescoping_pipe_and_tube.htm
Standard tube (not pipe, not EMT, etc) is available in clean inch sizes with standard wall thicknesses. The tube you have in stock is likely a 1" tube. If you need more, call your local steel supplier and ask for 1" ***TUBE*** size. (Not pipe, not EMT, etc. )
My local home store sells a 10'x20' canopy for around $100 including all tube, fittings, and tarps. You would need to add the sides. http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_200304845_200304845 A full 10'x20' garage with end caps is less the US $300 http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber654
David Todtman wrote:

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"David Todtman" wrote: (clip) To make the shelter I thought Id use metal tubing covered with a tarp. I want to have the structure up for around a month at a time and then take it apart for easy storage. (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I've seen structures put together out of plastic pipe--would this work for you?
How about flattening the ends of your tubing and drilling holes? You could then throw the thing together with bolts and wing nuts. Maybe weld on plates so you can make corners that knock down.
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The only easy combination I"ve found is 1" pipe in 1-1/4" pipe. I build similar temporary structures out of 2" lumber and landscaping timbers, with flat corrugated steel roofs that have held heavy snow loads. I design for 60Lbs / square foot, purlins spaced 24" or less. The roofing has survived a 1 foot overhang on the end but less is better. All pieces are full length with only lag screw holes added, so they can be reused elsewhere afterwards. The diagonal braces are 4', $0.50 pieces from Home Depot's scrap cart, the rest came from Lowe's which sold those 4"X6" PT posts for about $3 each last summer.
Here are the only two examples I have a photo of, without wading through deep snow during a blizzard:

The nearer one has 2X8 beams on the ends to support the rail, 2X6's between them for the roof. They drop into metal joist hangers and are my scaffold planks in summer. The 2X4s on the wall are spares which keep the tarp from blowing around too much. The shed beyond it was framed with tree trunks and recycled lumber. The tarps that cover the walls are screwed on along one side or upper edge and held closed with rope and snap hooks.
The roof panels are held down by extra pressure-treated timbers etc, you can see the end of one over the orange rail. This only works if the pitch is very small as otherwise they slowly slide downhill in strong winds. Because they aren't drilled I can use them for emergency storm repairs to my house.
I compromised on one more steeply pitched roof by bolting the roof panels together at the corners and attaching straps from the bolts back to the frame.
Compared to a ShelterLogic or similar tubing frame with a formed cover mine will take a heavier snow load and the tarps are all standard sizes, cheap and easily replaced. When the tarps are rolled up there is better access around the sides, but the walls of the steel ones my neighbors have stand high winds better.
Rectangular lumber stores more easily than round tubing and can be used for other things. Tubing needs its own wall rack. Their sheds are weighted down around the edges, which is a nuisance when you open the sides, mine have the weight permanently out of the way on the roof. After a few years their roofs leak. Mine drips when the ice on top condenses the moisture from humid spring air on the underside of the steel. They can clear the snow with a broom, often from inside. I leave it on all winter to protect the sheetmetal from falling branches.
Jim Wilkins
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On Sat, 17 Jan 2009 15:47:19 -0800 (PST), David Todtman

David...a number of local green houses use plain jane PVC pipe, the thick walled 1" and bend hoops, then cover with clear plastic. Seems to last them at least 4-5 years at minimum. Put a PVC "T" at the top center of each hoop and run a single stringer from hoop to hoop to keep them spaced apart. One guy puts the bottoms of the hoops in old 5 gal paint buckets and fills them with pea gravel and drop them into a hole and they stay in place pretty well.
I cant speak about your wind loading, but if they are placed sideways to the wind, our 60mph+ Santa Ana winds havent knocked them down, and the cost is a shitload cheaper than steel
Gunner
"Upon Roosevelt's death in 1945, H. L. Mencken predicted in his diary that Roosevelt would be remembered as a great president, "maybe even alongside Washington and Lincoln," opining that Roosevelt "had every quality that morons esteem in their heroes.""
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Gunner, This may be the best (except that I won't have to weld). I grew up partly in the high desert (Yucca Valley, 29 Palms, etc) and know what you mean by wind. Here on Vancouver Island, we sometimes get wind but not like that. Now that you mention this I have seen structures like that. I think I'd space the hoops at 4 or 5 foot intervals and run one or two 1x4 stringers the length. I'd probably cover the structure with white tarp rather than plastic. With the pipe sprung to a hoop shape, I would not have to glue the joints.
Humm....This means a trip to the local irrigation store for some sample material.
Best, David
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On Sun, 18 Jan 2009 15:16:49 -0800 (PST), David Todtman

And its a hell of a lot cheaper than steel......<G>
If the structure isnt very big...1/2" or 3/4" will work well enough.
Id go to 1" if I were going to hang some lights/Stuff from the PVC
Gunner, Bakersifield, California
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