What lens shade to use when spot welding?

I was wondering what lens shade # to use when spot welding mild and
stainless steel. Steel thickness not to exceed 1/8 inch.
Thanks
Matt
Reply to
Matt
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I had a nice little Miller spot welder for awhile, nice machine. It was an electric resistance welder, with arms and tips and stuff like that. You put in the workpiece, stepped on the pedal, waited a jif, let go, and the part was welded. No arc, no spark, no bright lights. No welding hood, no lens.
If you are spot welding with an arc, then of course you'd need to protect your eyes just as in normal arc welding.
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Its a small portable/handheld unit made by Chicago Electric. It was given to me by a friend who ended up not using it. I have a few more questions about the welder though. The instructions dictate to use the machine that you turn it on and then clamp the work and wait for the "spark" and then release. As I understand it and from the Welders Handbook first pressure is applied then current correct? The instructions also say to use a hood/goggles,hearing protection AND breathing protection. I have not used a spot welder before, but from all of the books that I have and the spot welding I have seen done none of this spare the goggles were used when welding clean metal. Im wondering if the instructions are just being extra cautious?
Thanks Matt
Reply to
Matt
Check out the MILLER site they have a free book you can download for spot welding.
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Click on the resistance spot welding link; it is the 6th book from the top. direct link here ;
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The general welding safety guide is a good choice for anyone just starting out, plus it has a lense shade selector and a welding cable chart.
These publications are all free from the Miller site or you can pay a couple of dollars for them off of Ebay. They may not cover 100% of every topic but they are a good place to start for begginer welders.
If you are spot welding on stainless or galvanized metal then you would use the same degree of respiratory protection as regular welding.
Safety glasses are always a good idea when doing any kind of welding; you never know when a bit of flying metal may try to get into an eye. The rest of the statement is just a company covering the rears; basically telling you too wear all your personal protective gear as you would for any other welding process. Same statement I must have reused a hundred times in the safety manual I am writing.
With the semiautomatic or fully automatic machines the clamping pressure is applied first then the current is switched on. The manual models are another story, the action of clamping starts the current flow; determined by the switch near the clamp end that is used for adjusting clamping pressure.
John
Reply to
John Noon
Those instructions in the handbook were clearly written by lawyers. It's a lot safer if you also stand inside a clear bubble, wearing a full radiation suit, with a division of armor outside too. What a bunch of crap.
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin

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