How do I trace plans and put markings on balsa ?

Hi,
I would be greatful if you could guide me on the following . I am trying
to trace part of the plans of a balsa trainer onto a cookie sheet so
that I can use it to make markings on the balsa . I am running into the
following problems
1) Nothing seems to be writing well on the waxed cookie sheets . I have
tried pencils , ball pens and felt pens.
2) Trying to make markings with pencil on the balsa causes small
indentations into it. The balas seems to be too soft for the pencil. I
would like to avoid any ink cause it might smear while with CA .
Is there any inexpensive way to transfer plan markings onto the balsa
that avoids these problems ?
TIA
b thomas
Reply to
B Thomas
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I use Charette "tracing vellum". A pad of 100 tabloid-size sheets costs just a few bucks. It has a 10 pt/inch grid and is translucent enough to trace plans. Once the plan part is traced I cut it out, tape or tack the pattern to the balsa, then cut directly, usually without first marking the wood.
I use the same paper and technique for making patterns for film covering...
/daytripper
Reply to
daytripper
Almost any quilting store sells a frosted plasic material (quilters call it "template plastic) that easily takes pencil markings (or pen, if you prefer) when tracing outlines over a plan. You then cut the material with a pair of sissors, and presto; you have a perfect pattern.
About $10 worth is enough for a giant scale airplane.
Reply to
Tom Minger
The easiest way I know how to do this is to make a photocopy of the part of the plans you need then use a hot iron to transfer the photocopy to the balsa.
-- Paul McIntosh Desert Sky Model Aviation
Reply to
Paul McIntosh
Two old time solutions.
1. Make a copy on a copy machine. Place the copy over the balsa and use a hot iron. The image will transfer to the balsa. I have NOT had good luck trying this with a computer printer. A regular copier works pretty well.
2. Lay the plans over the wood. Pin the plans to the balsa. Take a needle and stick hole through the plans on the part lines. This does very little damage to the plans. When you have worked your way around the part, use a French curve to connect the dots.
JR
Reply to
JR
That is because a copy machine is taking dry ink and then heating it as the copy is made which locks it in on the paper. A laser printer does the same thing. When you iron it, it is releasing the dry ink allowing the image to transfer. An inkjet printer would not work as it is letting the wet ink absorb into the paper.
Dave
Reply to
David B. Thomas Jr.
An easier method is to make an electrostatic (not inkjet) copy of the plans/patterns then place the copy on balsa sheet, then tamp with an old sock dampened ( not wet) with lacquer thinner or acetone. You have to make sure the copy is the same size as the original adjusting magnification settings as needed. Works really good and printwood lines are quite sharp and legible.
Gary Gullikson
Reply to
Gary Gullikson
Best way to solve this lil' problem will be found here
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Anything else is a waste of time and material.... If you haven't tried SeeTemp you're missin' the boat. End of story. Yeah... It's THAT good.....
Cheers,
Bill
Reply to
Bill Fulmer
Probably, but would cost more than laser cutting!
-- Paul McIntosh Desert Sky Model Aviation
> I wonder if those T-Shirt Transfer kits for Inkjets would work? > > -- > Normen Strobel > snipped-for-privacy@zoominternet.nospam.net
> > > > > > JR wrote: > > > Two old time solutions. > > > 1. Make a copy on a copy machine. Place the copy over the balsa and use > a > > > hot iron. The image will transfer to the balsa. I have NOT had good luck > > > trying this with a computer printer. A regular copier works pretty well. > > > > That is because a copy machine is taking dry ink and then heating it as > > the copy is made which locks it in on the paper. A laser printer does > > the same thing. When you iron it, it is releasing the dry ink allowing > > the image to transfer. An inkjet printer would not work as it is > > letting the wet ink absorb into the paper. > > > > Dave > > > > > > > > -- > > David B. Thomas Jr > > Blew-By-You PWC Services > > 93-A Pine Burr Rd Lumberton, MS 39455 > > (601) 796-2033
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or
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> > > > > > > >
Reply to
Paul McIntosh
Johnboy,
The t-shirt transfers will work just fine. After all, they transfer to a t-shirt, right?
-- Paul McIntosh Desert Sky Model Aviation
Reply to
Paul McIntosh
An alternative is to go to a fabric store and ask them about a Pounce Wheel. It is used to make patterns for garments. The wheel has hundreds of needle points on it, which when run over the plan placed on the balsa will put holes in the plan. Then, a dark powder sprinkled on the plan goes through the holes, leaving the outline needed.
Reply to
Charlie Funk
I picked this one up on te Ezone - works if you have a scaner/laser printer of photocipier
laser print from scanner, or photocopy teh bits you want to transfer.
Now take some dope thinners and a pad of tissue or cloth, and placing teh part face down on teh balsa, wipe JUST enough of teh thinner through so teh paper JUST goes translucent. The part will be printed on the balas. Too much thoinners and it smears. Too little and it doesn't work, so play around a bit first.
Other methods include pricking through, or simply measuring the part and cutting to teh size - ideal for square bulkheads etc. Then finish up by sanding gently to perfect shape.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
How do you get the plans onto your computer? Especially a plan sheet that is 24" x 36"?
That aside, I find it an easy method to photocopy a section of the plans then use spray adhesive to attach the paper to the wood.
I usually use Spray 77 but I understand artist's adhesive peels off better.
m-m
Reply to
M-M
On 7/26/2003 9:26 PM Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not so great) words of knowledge:
The easiest way I have found is to make a photocopy (or inkjet copy) of the part(s), cut them out (make sure to leave about 1/8" all the way around) and use a "glue stick" to apply them to the balsa. Then cut them out and finish sand to shape. The "pattern" will peel right off after, and any residue that MAY remain can easily be removed with some rubbing alcohol. If you are making multiples of the same part, I have found that the VINYL carpet tape is great for holding the sheets of balsa/ply together and easily separates after.
TIP: If you are using 1/8" "Light Ply", 2.7 mm luan plywood (available at most lumber yards) works just as well, is only fractionally heavier and costs about $8 - $10 for a 4'x8' sheet. Granted it is dark in color, but most of the ply used in a plane is either buried in the plane or covered/painted.
Reply to
Ted Campanelli
b, I photocopy the patterns, glue them to poster board, then cut them out. Then just trace onto the wood. Cut them out inside the lines. I keep the templates inside mailing envelopes in case I want to do another of the same model later. Gary
Reply to
Eulerckt

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