Imperial to metric......

Plans calls for 10 gauge piano wire, being imperial impaired, have no idea how thick this is....
Help please, how much is that in mm ?

Indy
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http://www.reade.com/Conversion/wire_gauge.html
2.588 mm (close to 1/8 inch
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Indy wrote:

Why are you bothering with metric? Imperial is so much easier - it's just common 37/363 inch wire.
In metric it'd be 2.6mm, but god knows what that means. Keep in mind that metric wire *will* be less reliable.
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Because I live where metric is standard.....

Care to shed some light on this statement ? Why would be metric piano wire be less reliable than imperial of same dia ?
Tnx for size...
Indy
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Err, it was a damn funny reply and fairly obviously 'tongue in cheek'. CM
wrote:

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Poxy wrote:

NOT if bent with metric pliers! d:->))
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CRaSH wrote:

Right-handed or left?
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Neither definitely calls for underhanded pliers.
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Actually "10 Gauge" wire has several different sizes -- British Imperial std wire shows .160" or 4.064 mm
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There are a bunch of different gauges. He is probably referring to American Wire Gauge (AWG) and 10 gauge is about 1/8". AWG is used almost exclusively on this continent. My Machinery's Handbook lists about six gauge systems, none of them even close to each other. On top of that, sometimes number drill sizes are used, where a drill of about 1/8" is a number 30. All these systems were developed independently before there was easy and universal communication between countries, like languages, and can have vastly different meanings. Metric is taking over. Get used to it. I still think in Imperial, but can see the huge advantages of the metric system. Makes mental arithmetic so much easier.
Dan
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When metric was forced on Canadians the government told us how much easier it would be to price food at the supermarket. Now we have food priced at so much per 100 grams or per 125 grams or whatever the supermarket managers selects for that week. Nothing has changed. It is no easier. And don't forget that anything measured by time still must be multiplied or divided by sixty and then by 12.

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But when you're building something everything is in units of 10 instead of 12 and 36 and 1/8 and 1/16. A liter of water weighs exactly a kilogram, and other metric units all line up the same way. Zero is freezing, 100 is boiling. Believe me, for the engineer it's a dream to work with. If the supermarket manager wants to mess with the shoppers' minds, they need to shop elsewhere.
Dan
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Most engineers I have worked with are proficient in either Metric or Imperial units, but if pushed will say they find Imperial more versatile and prefer those units. Mind you, I am an old fogey as are most of the people I have worked with.
I find it sad that my youngest son has no comprehension of what an eigth of an inch is - he was taught in school when only metric units were used. I had the good fortune to be taught both systems from a very early age.
Malcolm

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people I

I'm an old fogey, too, and still use the Imperial, but it's out of force of habit more than anything. The metric system works well for the young folks in Canada, and us old guys have to make a major mindset adjustment to avoid translating everything we hear or read in metric into Imperial so we have some frame of reference. It's not easy. When I'm driving, I still convert kilometers to miles so I can figure the ETA more easily. 100 km/h is a common speed limit, and is about 62 mph, or close enough to a mile a minute. If there are 87 km to the destination, I take 1/2 of that plus 10 percent (43 + 9) to get 52 miles, or 52 minutes if I'm behaving myself. Somewhat easier than figuring 87 percent of an hour, for me, anyway. Of course, the young guy would say 90 percent would be close, and 90 percent of an hour is 54 minutes (.9 x 60, or the same as 9 x 6). *IF* the young guy could do mental arithmetic, which most can't.
Dan
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and more SNIP
Of course, the young guy would say 90 percent would be close, and 90 percent of an hour is

Agreed. I remember trying to teach mathematics to 11 year olds. I was horrified to find that the Syllabus put more emphasis on using calculators than teaching the basics of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division and when I suggested that basic multiplication tables ought to be learned, there was uproar - from teachers in the Maths department.
I still usually do my sums in my head - after all the batteries never run down.
Malcolm

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You must be speaking as a mechanical engineer. As an electronics engineer I find that time is still measured in minutes and seconds so metric makes no difference at all to calculations.

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I don't know what you are engineering, but by and large the bulk of electronics is concerned with and measured in seconds or metric subsets of a second (milli,micro,nano...). The logic can all be expressed in terms of seconds and only converted to minutes or whatever when it is displayed to a user, otherwise it is being done the hard way.

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(Do you not have Google's metric edition?)
10 ga AWG is roughly the same as 1/8" drill rod. If you rig it carefully, it can support a small car. What are you building?
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wrote:

Hmmmm, Google ME (metric Edition) server was down when I wrote my question :)
What's on buliding board ? RCM&E March 2003 issue; Kestrel Autogyro, plan calls for 10 ga wire (in meantime found out it is SWG, NOT AWG....) for rotor axle.
Indy
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it
10 swg wire is, as near as makes no real difference 1/8 inch diameter, approx 3.2mm. Malcolm

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