Questions - Trying to build for a change

I haven't really built much in over 10 years - it just doesn't appeal to me. But out of curiosity I think I'd like to try a scratch-build again. Due to
the fact that I'm not a native speaker I'm a little lost at my LHS - they just stare at me when I try to explain what I want/need (and no, I don't look good enough to justify the stares!)
So, the project I'm after is building a 200% model of Parkzones Stryker. I like the flying characteristics and am curious if I even can get a bigger model into the air at all. I've built "normal" planes before, so I know a little (and ONLY a little) about the general construction.
The frame and wings I'd like to build with thin plywood, and cover it with iron-on stuff (I'd call it foil, but... dunno?). First question: what is that stuff called in english? Or is there some better way for fuselage/wing covering nowadays?
The leading wing edge will most likely be done with Balsa, possibly with a CF rod at the very edge.
Wing joining and stiffening I'd like to do with a locking CF or iron rod. By locking I mean that I'll put one through the center fuselage, with a foot or so sticking into the wing. In the wing I'll put a bolt which will go through a drilled hole in the CF rod and thus lock it in place. I've never worked with CF rods for that, only steel rods - thus the next question: Will CF rods be stiff and strong enough for this, and is there any way to calculate the needed thickness if I have the wing weight and expected G force? Is there any better way to lock wings to the main fuselage?
The double tail fins of the Stryker make me wonder too... since I'll probably end up putting rudder fins in them I think I better reinforce their mounting. But what's the best way to do that? Using wire to tie them to the fuselage? Bolts through the center of them? No idea yet.
Landing gear and power system... big, big question mark. I'd _like_ to go electric, but I'm thinking IC would provide easier power. The configuration of the engine also makes me wonder. Pusher jet seems logical "per se", but I'm afraid I'd hit ground way too easy during landing. I can always put the engine in the nose if need be. The question here is: How do I figure out how much power I need? In the past I tended to just stick a 2HP IC in my models and see if it was enough... not particularly scientific :)
The whole project is currently only in the "I wonder if I can do this" stage, so if what I am saying sounds silly - it probably is :)
Anyway, all hints and help are much appreciated.
Thanks Jenni
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You are going to get 100 different suggestion from 100 different folks. Many of the suggestions will work and rest of them won't. There is no way to know until you sweat it out.
I would suggest to keep it simple.
1. Go Electric. Some latest outrunners are capable of lifting an elephant into the air (Well, you get it..right?). If one motor doesn't push the jet, then make it more challenging by adding another motor. 2. Measure a existing stryker and multiply by 2. Buy depron at your LHS and start cutting things out at 2X. 3. Use Balsa or carbon rods as a frame / foundation to withstand the g-force because your model's surface area will be twice as large. 4. Buy a hobby sander kit and you can mold your depron in whatever way you want. 5. Visit Motocalc.com to get some idea about motor / battery selection. 6. Visit http://www.rc-electric-aircraft-info.com/model-rc-airplane.html to get an idea about load factors.
Since you wrote a biiiig mail, looks like you have patience so I don't have to add it to the list :)
And finally, Good luck !!!
Jennifer Smith wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jennifer Smith wrote:

Of WHAT are you not a native speaker? You appear to be stuck out in the middle of nowhere on a coral reef administered by New Zealand. Is that right?

If you are indeed on Niue, I'm amazed that you even have one!!!
Check this site in New Zealand - a mere 4,000KM away! http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~atong /
Geoff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Geoff Sanders wrote:

Not a native english speaker of course, my dear Geoff.. sheesh... MEN ;)
Jenni
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hmmm....
Lets see, you wanna scratch build a ParkZone flyer but power it wet? Build out of balsa and cover it with monocote iron on film sounds reasonable, the carbon fibre leading edge is expensive and probably overkill. Power? Depends on how big and how fast you want it to go. If you are going for the flight characteristics, do not move the powerpackage.
Does that make as much sense as your original post?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ACE Hobby offers a number of glow powered park flyer kits, actually:
http://www.thundertiger4u.com/index.php?cPath (_132
http://www.thundertiger4u.com/index.php?cPath (_131
Pair any of these easy building kits with a Thunder Tiger GP-07 motor and you've got a glow powered park flyer.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jennifer Smith Wrote:

That stuff as stated in a previous post is called Monokote, Ultracote Coverite, AeroKote, EconoKote.
It all depend on availability in your neck of the woods and preference but the first 3 are the most comon IMO.
Good luck with your build and keep us posted :
-- habutt ----------------------------------------------------------------------- habutti's Profile: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/member.php?u 24 View this thread: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?tH354
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Since, you're in a rush, I'd suggest doing some kit bashing or using an existing design that's close.
Laddie Mikilasko (apologies to Laddie as I'm spelling your name from memory) published a large number of delta designs in RCM (www.rcmmodeler.com). THe magazine is out of business but the plans service is going strong.
Look at the Force One, Northstar, and Enforcer designs -- swipe the wing design, build your own fusleage to match the Stryker and you're just about home free!
If building for electric, make sure that you use contest grade woods (super light), otherwise the pale blond wood from the LHS is probably good enough if you use the right grain ("C" should OK for the ribs and sheeting on the wings).
If you want to go from a kit, then I suggest the Lanier Shrike kits, probably the .40 size, bash it about by doing a new fuselage section.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I built a Force One about 20 years ago and modified it to have "flying" rudders since the original had no rudder control. (They didn't do jack.. hehe) I powered it with a .40 K&B with a tuned pipe stuffed back up the fuse and a 3 bladed pusher prop. Very fast and the roll rate was insane and it would pretty much turn around in its own length if you laid it on its side and hauled back on the elevator. Very fun and its demise was spectacular. (imagine about a 50' cartwheeling crash with crap flying everywhere!) Always wanted to build another one. Can ya still get 'em from Balsa USA?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, you can get them from Balsa US
-- LADDI ----------------------------------------------------------------------- LADDIE's Profile: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/member.php?u 55 View this thread: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?tH354
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.